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  • £132.00

    Abstractions - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    Verket ble bestilt av Norges Musikkorpsforbund som pliktnummer til NM for Brass Band 2. divisjon (na 1. divisjon) 1990.Satstitlene er abstraksjoner der synsopplevelser er tenkt gjenskapt som musikk, altsa en abstrakt fremstilling av et motiv, likt et abstrakt bilde der man ikke umiddelbart kan se likheten.1. Aurora Borealis (Lento espressivo) Inspirert av Nordlyset som kan vaere svaert intenst vinterstid.Det er aldri i ro og antar nye fasonger og farger hele tiden mens det farer over nattehimmelen.The first movement is inspired by the northern lights. It constantly changes in colour and shape.2. Rocks (Moderato ben ritmico)I denne satsen er tittelen et ordspill. Ordet "rock" er velkjent i musikken, men er ogsa en enorm stein eller del av et fjell.The title of the second movement is a play with the word "rock" is a well-known word describing a musical genre. But it is also a giant stone or a part of a mountain.3. Seascape (Allegro)I denne satsen forsoker jeg a fange ulike aspekter ved havet, samtidig som satsen samler opp musikalske ideer fra de to foregaende satsene. Denne satsen videreforer, oppsummerer og avslutter verket.The third movement is inspired by different aspects of the sea. It also sums up different ideas that occurs in the two previous movements to round off the whole piece.Tredje utgave - 2015Third Edition - 2015

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £47.00

    Suite SymA(c)trique (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    This playful three-part suite is largely based on symmetry. This of course is largely due to the relations of the arrangement of the themes; however, on the other hand, to the larger structures in form. The first part, (Prelude et Scherzo) has a solemn opening. Followed by it a related scherzo with many changes in time, this too is composed in a symmetrical form. In the second movement, Choral Dorian, the theme of the prelude is reversed and used in chorale in Dorian tonality. The suite comes to a close with Rondo d'Avignon. An annual theatre festival in a French city on the Rhone inspired this suite. It is a lively movement, symmetrically bought to a finish with a repeat of the prelude from the first movement. 05:18

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £53.00

    Suite Symetrique - Jacob de Haan - Menno Haantjes

    This playful three-part suite is largely based on symmetry. This of course is largely due to the relations of the arrangement of the themes; however, on the other hand, to the larger structures in form. The first part, (Prelude et Scherzo) has a solemn opening. Followed by it a related scherzo with many changes in time, this too is composed in a symmetrical form. In the second movement, Choral Dorian, the theme of the prelude is reversed and used in chorale in Dorian tonality. The suite comes to a close with Rondo d'Avignon. An annual theatre festival in a French city on the Rhone inspired this suite. It is a lively movement, symmetrically bought to a finish with a repeat of the prelude from the first movement.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £63.00

    Bread and Games - William Vean

    'Panem et Circenses', Bread and Games were essential for keeping the citizens of ancient Rome in check. While the bread was meant for the poorest among the Romans, the Games were Popular Pastime Number One for everybody.There were different kinds of games, such as chariot races (especially popular with female spectators), or wild-beast fights, where lions, tigers, bulls or bears were set on one another or even on human beings. Most popular, however, were the Gladiator fights. In 'Bread and Games' William Vean depicts one of the many fights in the antique Colosseum. 1. Entrance of the Gladiators: By powerful bugle-calls the attention of the people was asked for, after which the Gladiators entered the Arena at the sound of heroic marching-music.2.Swordfight: We can hear that the fights were not mere child's play in this part.On the contrary, they were a matter of life and death and were fought accordingly.3.Mercy of the Emperor: Sometimes a wounded gladiator could be fortunate, depending on the mercy of the audience. Waving one's handkerchief meant mercy, a turned-down thumb meant no pardon. The Emperor had the right to take the final decision, but he usually complied with the wish of the majority of the public. 4.Lap of Honour: Gladiators were mainly selected among slaves, convicted criminals, or prisoners of war. Consequently, winning was very important, as it would mean fame, honour and sometimes even wealth. A lap of honour, therefore, was the winner's due reward.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £72.90

    What Now My Love - Gilbert Becaud - Ray Farr

    What Now, My Love was written in 1961 by composer Gilbert Becaud and lyricist Pierre Delanoe with the original title Et Maintenant.Very many top, internationally renowned artists have recorded this song including Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra and Shirley Bassey.Ray Farr has set the emotional song to the ostinato of Ravel's Bolero, and features several soloists from within the band.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £27.50

    Let Him Go / Lullaby - Brahms, J - Ruffles, ET

    Includes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £11.00
  • £74.00

    Aimer - PRESGURVIC, Gerard (Arr.: John Glenesk Mortimer / Bertrand Moren)

    from the Musical: Romeo et Juliette

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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