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  • £63.40

    The Basic Elements - Dick van Heuvel

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £21.50

    Sibelius Fantasy - Gavin Somerset

    Composed in 2003 for a composition competition, this work uses elements of three major work by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius (1865-1957). The three being... Symphony No.5, Finlandia, Karelia Suite (March) The piece starts with an atmospheric opening before setting of in bar 10 with a tempo that will remain for most of the piece. The main original theme is brought in at A before the famous sequence from Sibelius' Symphony No.5 enters at B and then very distinctly at C. The music then rollercoasts through keeping all sections of the band busy, until we reach J when the solo Euphonium can shine, helped along by Flugel and Repiano. The Molto Vivo before K sets off with dazzling trills from the cornet section, and bringing with it the theme from Finlandia in bar 165, followed shortly by the March from the Karelia Suite. From N to the end, all three pieces are brought to a final climax together. A rousing piece and makes an interesting change to a direct transcription.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £90.00

    Evolution - Philip Sparke

    Evolution was commissioned by Kunstfactor for the 4th section of the Dutch National Brass Band Championships (NBK) 2011. It is dedicated to Jappie Dijkstra and the Music Information Centre (MUI), Arnhem, Holland, in acknowledgement of their outstanding work in developing brass band repertoire. The composer writes:-The idea for the piece came when I was reading an article about a branch of Chinese philosophy which is abbreviated as Wu Xing, which has no exact translation but can mean, for example, five elements, five phases or five states of change. It is central to all elements of Chinese thought, including science, philosophy, medicine and astrology, and in simple terms tries to create various cyclic relationships between five elements in all walks of life. An example is: Earth - Metal - Water - Wood - Fire - (Earth) etc. where (in one cycle) earth bears metal, metal changes to liquid (water) when heated, water helps trees grow, wood burns to create fire, fire produces ash (earth) and the cycle continues.I was particularly interested in the cycle of emotions: Meditation - Sorrow - Fear - Anger - Joy - (Meditation) etc. and thought this cyclic principle would provide an effective emotional journey for a piece of music. So Evolution has five equal sections which loosely characterise this emotional cycle. I have tried to make the music grow organically, with minimal repetition, and each movement evolves from the musical elements at the end of the previous one, with the opening material appearing, transformed, at the end of the piece to complete the cycle.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £81.00

    Evolution (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Evolution was commissioned by Kunstfactor for the 4th section of the Dutch National Brass Band Championships (NBK) 2011. It is dedicated to Jappie Dijkstra and the Music Information Centre (MUI), Arnhem, Holland, in acknowledgement of their outstanding work in developing brass band repertoire. The composer writes:-The idea for the piece came when I was reading an article about a branch of Chinese philosophy which is abbreviated as Wu Xing, which has no exact translation but can mean, for example, five elements, five phases or five states of change. It is central to all elements of Chinese thought, including science, philosophy, medicine and astrology, and in simple terms tries to create various cyclic relationships between five elements in all walks of life. An example is: Earth - Metal - Water - Wood - Fire - (Earth) etc. where (in one cycle) earth bears metal, metal changes to liquid (water) when heated, water helps trees grow, wood burns to create fire, fire produces ash (earth) and the cycle continues.I was particularly interested in the cycle of emotions: Meditation - Sorrow - Fear - Anger - Joy - (Meditation) etc. and thought this cyclic principle would provide an effective emotional journey for a piece of music. So Evolution has five equal sections which loosely characterise this emotional cycle. I have tried to make the music grow organically, with minimal repetition, and each movement evolves from the musical elements at the end of the previous one, with the opening material appearing, transformed, at the end of the piece to complete the cycle. 11:10

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £26.50

    Evolution (Brass Band - Score only)

    Evolution was commissioned by Kunstfactor for the 4th section of the Dutch National Brass Band Championships (NBK) 2011. It is dedicated to Jappie Dijkstra and the Music Information Centre (MUI), Arnhem, Holland, in acknowledgement of their outstanding work in developing brass band repertoire. The composer writes:-The idea for the piece came when I was reading an article about a branch of Chinese philosophy which is abbreviated as Wu Xing, which has no exact translation but can mean, for example, five elements, five phases or five states of change. It is central to all elements of Chinese thought, including science, philosophy, medicine and astrology, and in simple terms tries to create various cyclic relationships between five elements in all walks of life. An example is: Earth - Metal - Water - Wood - Fire - (Earth) etc. where (in one cycle) earth bears metal, metal changes to liquid (water) when heated, water helps trees grow, wood burns to create fire, fire produces ash (earth) and the cycle continues.I was particularly interested in the cycle of emotions: Meditation - Sorrow - Fear - Anger - Joy - (Meditation) etc. and thought this cyclic principle would provide an effective emotional journey for a piece of music. So Evolution has five equal sections which loosely characterise this emotional cycle. I have tried to make the music grow organically, with minimal repetition, and each movement evolves from the musical elements at the end of the previous one, with the opening material appearing, transformed, at the end of the piece to complete the cycle. 11:10

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £34.95

    Aristotle's Air - Christopher Bond

    The Ancient Greeks believed that there were four elements that everything was made up of: earth, water, air and fire. This theory was suggested around 450 BC, and was later supported and added to by Aristotle. The idea that these four elements – earth, water, air and fire – made up all matter was the cornerstone of philosophy, science, and medicine for two thousand years.Air was considered a pure element, but in fact the air that’s all around us is made up of a variety of gasses. Of course, in music, air has a different meaning; a beautiful song-like melody or tune and Aristotle’s Air is just that.The work was commissioned by and written for The Cory Band as part of their winning 2015 Brass in Concert programme The Four Elements of the Universe, being premiered at the contest at The Sage, Gateshead, on 15th November 2015. The work was awarded the Cyril Beere Memorial Trophy for the Best New Composition or Arrangement.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Aristotle's Air - Christopher Bond

    Written for & Commissioned by Cory Band for Brass in Concert 2015, Winner of Best New Composition/Arrangement at Brass in Concert 2015The Ancient Greeks believed that there were four elements that everything was made up of: earth, water, air and fire. This theory was suggested around 450 BC, and was later supported and added to by Aristotle. The idea that these four elements - earth, water, air and fire - made up all matter was the cornerstone of philosophy, science, and medicine for two thousand years. Air was considered a 'pure' element, but in fact the air that's all around us is made up of a variety of gasses. Of course, in music, air has a different meaning; a beautiful song-like melody or tune and Aristotle's Air is just that. The work was commissioned by and written for The Cory Band as part of their winning 2015 Brass in Concert programme 'TheFour Elements of the Universe', being premiered at the contest at The Sage, Gateshead, on 15th November 2015. The work was awarded the Cyril Beere Memorial Trophy for the Best New Composition or Arrangement.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £55.00

    Balkan Dance - Score & Parts - Etienne Crusaz

    The Balkans region has always been a source of musical inspiration for composers throughout the centuries. Strong rhythms and often-abundant musical climaxes are two important characteristics of this rich and varied musical style. Etienne Crausaz took some of these elements and mixed it with elements of rock, turning this Balkan Dance into an exuberant and spectacular piece of music, during which no one can remain seated!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £8.95

    Balkan Dance - Score Only - Etienne Crusaz

    The Balkans region has always been a source of musical inspiration for composers throughout the centuries. Strong rhythms and often-abundant musical climaxes are two important characteristics of this rich and varied musical style. Etienne Crausaz took some of these elements and mixed it with elements of rock, turning this Balkan Dance into an exuberant and spectacular piece of music, during which no one can remain seated!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days