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  • £37.00

    They are Coming - John Emerson Blackstone

    There are people who are capable of planning well. They live their lives in a well-structured manner and know exactly what they have to do. On the other hand, there are also people who are the exact opposite: they want to do too many things at once and are often somewhat absent-minded, which occasionally results in frantic situations. The outcome of one such situation is 'They are coming'. John Emerson Blackstone had been working on a new composition for some time when he received a telephone call from his editor, who told him that the deadline was approaching rapidly, even worse, that it would expire at the end of that same day and that he would drop by in person to fetch the composition! Blackstone set to work in a frenzy and completed the last details. When his editor arrived, the piece was finished ..... and got its definitive title: 'They are coming'.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £25.50

    Polish Adventures - Gavin Somerset

    Composed for the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield after their trip to Poland in the summer of 2003. This work reflects the different parts of the tour in four continuous movements... PROGRAM NOTES AS THEY APPREAR ON SCORE COVER I don't wish to ramble on with the program notes, do I do believe that if you know the story behind a piece of music, it just puts that extra something into the players performance. In 2002, the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield, embarked on a 10 day tour of Poland. The group spent 28hrs on a couch packed with instruments, only to arrive finding Poland experiencing its worst summer in 70 years. In 2003, they decided to go back for another go! This time, luxury all the way, no 28hr coach journey, just a 1 1/2hr flight. This piece tells the story of the 2nd tour of Poland in four continuous movements... First the introduction. Early one morning, prepared for the drive to the airport, everyone tired, but excited. A day prior to this, some parents of the children set off in a van driving the instruments to the hotel, some 300 miles away. Bar 13 introduces the "Van" theme. Once arriving at the airport, the movements begin... 1. MORNING FLIGHT A very self explanatory part of the piece, and impressionist in its writing. Flying high over England and the channel, giving a sense of speed we were travelling at (compared to the poor lads in the van somewhere below us!) The Largo before F tells of the short coach journey to the hotel, and settling into what was our new home for 10 days. 2. IN THE STORM The weather was definitely an improvement on last year. So much so, that it became a regular event of the day to go and play rounders in a nearby field. This particular day however, with everyone concentrating hard on the game, it escaped everyone's attention that there was a very large storm creeping over the high mountain range near us. As the title of the movement suggests, the scene involved 25 of us running as fast as we could back to the hotel. Unfortunately, the heavy rain ran faster than us. 3. LAST MEMORIES As most of the people in the band were 18 this year, it was apparent that this would be their last event with the band. Many of the group had grown up together for the last 7 years and so, as the tour came to a close, there was a sense of sadness in the air, but everyone would always have the memories. 4. FINALE & HOME The van and the brave volunteers that went with it, set off the day before the rest of us flew home. This last movement reflect the whole tour, bringing back all the main themes from the different movements before arriving back at the school, just in time to see the van pull up. The "Van" theme makes its presence heard again towards the end. This piece was performed by the Wind Band at the leaving concert of many of the players in the band. I dedicate this piece to the band which is still functioning with new players, and to all those who took part on this tour.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £79.95

    Waiting for a Pain Hit!??!!? - Paul McGhee

    Waiting For a Pain Hit!??!!? was written during November and December 2006 as an entry in the 2006/07 Swiss Brass Band Association Composers Competition. It was later chosen as the Championship Section set test piece for the 2010 Swiss National Brass Band Championships.The piece originates from sketches for a Brass Quintet which was written whilst I was in my second year of studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. The piece, now being much more elaborate both musically and structurally than the original, aims to explore the many various textures available to a large brass ensemble. The aims of the piece, from its earliest stages, were mainly exploration of textures as well as dealing with issues of continuity and whilst the piece certainly contains challenging technical elements, they were not a driving force behind its inception and more organically grew from the primary aims of the piece. I was purposefully looking throughout the writing and editing process to create a piece of music with a seamless, ethereal quality to both the structure and the musical content.There are no 'performance directions' throughout the piece, the reasoning for this is explained below. However, I have spent much time and thought over the tempo markings throughout the piece and the tempos throughout the piece are the desired tempi and care should be taken with these. The tempo markings contained throughout the piece form a vital part of the structure and affect the continuity of the piece. Metronome marks contained within a box show the tempo of the new section in relation to the tempo that precedes it by use of metronome modulations. Any alterations tothe tempo of the section that precedes it will alter the boxed metronome marks.The title of a piece of music, please forgive my generalisation, is to give an insight into 'what a piece is about'. I suppose that this piece is no different, but with the title being slightly abstract I shall resist the temptation to reveal what it means to me. The title, I feel, needs to be open to interpretation along with the music within. That's the way, with this piece especially, I like my music to be. Freedom to find our own meaning and a way to express it from within the score is vital. It is only then that the piece can take on its own identity and grow in ways that even I might not have imagined, revealing different sides to its personality with each performance.Before the music begins I have included some text. Do these words hold the key to the music?! Can they help??!I DON'T KNOW!!!I just like the rhythms, the pulse and the imagery. Hopefully all of this can help to create a picture. But let it be your picture...Paul McGhee, June 2010.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days