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  • £63.00

    Make my day - Ron Gilmore

    Make my day means something like: it makes me happy. This term refers especially to this up-tempo composition of Ron Gilmore. Ideal as a bouncer at your concert!

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £139.95

    'The New Christmas Collection' - Full Set March Card Size

    The new Christmas Collection carol books contain all the traditional Christmas Carols, with some new 'pop' music arrangements included to add more variety to your carolling this year.

     

    * Note, these are not compatible with the New Christmas Praise books.

    Full list of works in The Christmas Collection:-

    • A child this day is born
    • A Christmas lullaby
    • A great and mighty wonder
    • All I want for Christmas is you
    • All my heart this night rejoices
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Come and worship)
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Iris)
    • Angels we have heard on high
    • A starry night
    • As with gladness men of old
    • Auld lang syne
    • A virgin most pure
    • Away in a manger (The manger scene)
    • Away in a manger (Traditional)
    • A winter’s tale
    • Bethlehem
    • Brightest and best (Spean)
    • Brightest and best (Traditional)
    • Calypso Carol
    • Carol for the Nativity
    • Carol of the bells
    • Carol of the drum
    • Child of Mary
    • Christians Awake!
    • Christ is born (Il est né)
    • Christ was born on Christmas Day
    • Come and join the celebration
    • Come, children, come quickly
    • Coventry Carol
    • Deck the hall
    • Ding dong! merrily on high
    • Do you hear what I hear?
    • Frosty the snowman
    • Gabriel’s Message
    • Gaudete
    • Glory in the highest
    • Glory in the highest Heaven
    • God of God, the uncreated
    • God rest you merry, gentlemen
    • Good Christian men, rejoice
    • Good King Wenceslas
    • Go, tell it on the mountain!
    • Happy Christmas (War is over)
    • Hark the glad sound!
    • Hark! the herald angels sing
    • Have yourself a merry little Christmas
    • Here we come a-wassailing
    • How far is it to Bethlehem?
    • Huron Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • In the bleak midwinter (Cranham)
    • In the bleak midwinter (Darke)
    • I saw mommy kissing Santa Claus
    • I saw three ships come sailing in
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Traditional)
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Willis)
    • It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas
    • It’s the most wonderful time of the year
    • I wish it could be Christmas everyday
    • I wonder as I wander
    • Jesus, good above all other
    • Jingle Bells
    • Jingle bell rock
    • Joy to the world!
    • Last Christmas
    • Let it snow!
    • Little baby Jesus
    • Little children, wake and listen
    • Little Donkey
    • Little Jesus, sweetly sleep
    • Lo! he comes with clouds descending
    • Long, long ago
    • Love came down at Christmas
    • Mary’s boy child
    • Mary’s Child
    • Masters in this hall
    • Merry Christmas everyone
    • Mistletoe and wine
    • Noel
    • O Christmas tree
    • O come, all ye faithful
    • O come, Immanuel
    • O Heaven-sent King
    • O holy night!
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Christmas Carol)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Forest Green)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (St Louis)
    • Once in royal David’s city
    • Past three o’clock
    • Patapan
    • Personent Hodie
    • Praise ye the Lord
    • Ring the bells
    • Rise up, shepherd!
    • Rockin’ around the Christmas tree
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • Sans day carol
    • Santa Claus is comin’ to town
    • Saviour’s Day
    • See, amid the winter’s snow
    • Silent Night!
    • Sleigh Ride
    • Softly the night is sleeping
    • So here it is, merry Christmas
    • Stars are shining
    • Still, still, still
    • Stop the cavalry
    • Sussex Carol
    • Sweet chiming bells
    • Sweet chiming Christmas bells
    • The candle song
    • The cherry tree carol
    • The Christmas song
    • The first Nowell
    • The holly and the ivy
    • The infant King
    • The light has come
    • The shepherds’ farewell
    • The stable door
    • The star in the east
    • The twelve days of Christmas
    • The virgin Mary had a baby boy
    • They all were looking for a king
    • Thou didst leave thy throne
    • Three kings’ march
    • Unto us a boy is born
    • Walking in the air
    • We gather round the manger-bed
    • We three kings of Orient are
    • We wish you a merry Christmas
    • What child is this?
    • When a child is born
    • When Santa got stuck up the chimney
    • Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?
    • When wise men came seeking
    • While shepherds watched (Cranbrook)
    • While shepherds watched (Handel)
    • While shepherds watched (Winchester Old)
    • White Christmas
    • Who is he?
    • Winter Wonderland
    • Worldwide Christmas message
    • Zither Carol
    • A starry night
    • Christmas Joy
    • Christmas Praise
    • Coventry Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • Mid-winter
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • The everlasting light
    • To celebrate his birth
    • Yuletide Rag

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TRANSFORMATION (Brass Band Set) - Kenneth Downie

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score only) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £94.00

    Nordic Moods - Tom Brevik

    The composer:1st movement: Reflections by the Fjord.Overlooking one of the mighty fjords of Norway, my mind and thoughts are with an old religious Norwegian folk-tune, with words by the famous parson Peter Dass.The majestic fanfare-like opening reflects the power of God our Father, the choral itself heard for the first time on flugelhorn. The choral is repeated a few times, separated only by some short variations. The movement ends in thriumph, with fanfares and the choral brought together.2nd movement: Reflections in the Old Church.In this movement my associations of a summer day, finding myself alone in an old deserted stone church. From the old walls I hear folk songs, perhaps like the ones sung in the church by poor fishermen and farmers in days gone by. Suddenly the light from the sun breakes through the small circular window above the altar, and a lovely melody is heard, before the original figures take us to the end of the movement.3rd movement: Festive Reflections.Any festive occasion can be reflected in this movement. from the bonfire at midsummer-night to the children celebrating the return of the sun in the northern part of Norway. from the traditional sleigh-riding at Christmas to the Celebrations of the National Day on the 17th of May each year.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £63.00

    Animal Kingdom - William Vean

    In this composition William Vean takes you on a journey through the fascinating and exciting world of animals. Apart from it being a composition filled with "special effects", Animal Kingdom contains many educational elements, such as playing in swing (triplets feeling), chromatics, flutter tonguing, gypsy tuning, varying keys, and, of course, dynamics and articulation. The melodic lines occur in all four voices, as well as in all percussion parts, providing each musician with the opportunity to play a solo or to accompany. Highly recommended for your youth band! William Vean is an educational composer. He knows how to musically shape the special elements from our daily lives. His music is therefore very expressive, containing creative solutions to possible problems. Special ways of playing make his music particularly interesting for the winds, but the percussion section is also featured in his special effects. The world of the animals always plays on ones imagination. In Animal Kingdom, William Vean has portrayed a number of animals in a special manner: Kevin Kangaroo - The jumping character of this animal can be heard in different voices. The swing style also emphasizes the characteristic movements of the kangaroo. Playing in swing style can be practised by using scales. Eddy Elephant - For some of his smaller fellow fauna friends this can be quite an ordeal, but for Eduard (Eddy for friends and intimates) it is his daily walk. Baldrick Bat - Baldrick the Bat is a mysterious character. This can be heard in the fast moving valves and keys, accompanied by special effects in the percussion section. Curtis Camel - Curtis the Camel trudges across the desert, feeling bored. The idea that the horizon will never change does not affect him anymore. He has accepted his fate. The distinctive tones from the gypsy scale provide the suitable oriental sounds. Betty Butterfly - Butterfly Betty elegantly, and without worries, flutters from flower to flower in the garden. Her motto: Carpe Diem (Seize the Day). Betty is a one-day butterfly. Marvin Monkey - A "swing" monkey stirs up the feelings. Even members of the orchestra will look like real monkeys. How about your audience? Each part has its own difficulties and challenges. Important in the first part is playing "in swing" (triplets feeling). This can be practised using scales. In the second part ensemble playing and balance are important. In Baldrick additional information on the effects that have to be played might be useful. "New" sounds are, of course, welcome. Curtis the Camel introduces the gypsy scale. Additional explanation of the use of the scale might be useful. Key changes are interesting in this part. A slight accent on the first beat of the bar will add to the charm of this part. Marvin the Monkey brings back the swing rhythm that was introduced in the first part, alternated by a "straight" part with attention to chromatics and articulation. A story teller will definitely be an asset when performing this composition.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008

  • £64.95

    Platform to the Heavens - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The piece takes its inspiration from the mountain ranges from one of my favourite countries, Switzerland.I have visited the Swiss Alps on many occasions and I am still taken back by its sheer awesome beauty with every visit. This commission gave me the opportunity to pay homage to this wonderful landscape and paint my own musical picture of it.The piece opens with what I imagine daybreak would be like at one of its many peaks. With the sun growing behind the mountain range, the piece builds from a single note to a huge climatic chord revealing Mother Nature’s creation.Then at rehearsal figure ‘C’ the tempo changes dramatically as we fly through the many slopes of the mountains as if on a manic skiing expedition, revealing the many dangers within the Swiss Alps.The twists, turns and climaxes begin to die away as we enter rehearsal figure ‘M’ - nightfall over the mountains. As the sun disappears, the sky darkens to reveal the beautiful starlit sky above the mountain range. This middle section starts with the various cadenzas that serve as echoes around the Alps. It then leads to a lyrical solo at rehearsal figure ‘O’ as the moonlight illuminates the icy mountain peaks. A final cadenza to conclude this section highlights the end of nightfall as the sun starts to rise again.This recapitulation from the opening, signals a new dawn as the sun rises above the snowy peaks once again. The music at this point in its slightly altered state highlights the dawn of a new day in the Alps. The fast manic ski ride follows which takes the piece to its grand finale conclusion.The idea behind the title of this piece is that the Swiss Alps are so beautiful and vast; I can only imagine that they could be a platform connecting the earth to the heavens above.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £94.00

    The Power of the Megatsunami - Carl Wittrock

    The word 'tsunami' is of Japanese origin. When you look it up in a dictionary, you will find that it means 'a great sea wave produced by submarine earth movement or volcanic eruption'. A megatsunami is the superlative of this awesome expression of power that nature can create, and has catastrophic consequences. When Carl Wittrock completed this composition not many such big earth movements had occurred, but since then we have become all too familiar with the disastrous consequences which a tsunami may have. On the 26th of December 2004 a heavy seaquake took place near the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Tidal waves 10 meters in height ravaged the coastal regions of many countries for miles around. The tsunami took the lives of thousands of people and destroyed many villages and towns. There are more areas which run the risk of being struck by a tsunami, such as the island of La Palma, one of the Canary Islands. This island is based on oceanic crust at a fracture zone and as such is one of nature's time bombs. The consequences of a natural calamity like a megatsunami are immense. In the case of La Palma, the tidal wave will move in the direction of South America, where it may reach 50 km inland, destroying everything on its way. In his composition Wittrock describes an ordinary day which will have an unexpected ending. Right from the beginning there seems to be something in the air, the music creating an oppressive atmosphere of impending disaster. Themes are interrupted, broken off suddenly, followed by silence, suggesting the calm before the storm. Suddenly a short climax (glissandi in the trombone part) indicates the seaquake, and the megatsunami is a fact. Hereafter follows a turbulent passage symbolising the huge rolling waves. After nature's force has spent itself, resignation sets in and the composition ends with a majestic ode to nature.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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