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  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Anyone Who Had A Heart - Burt Bacharach and Hal David - Len Jenkins

    "Anyone Who Had A Heart" is a song written by Burt Bacharach (music) and Hal David (lyrics) originally for Dionne Warwick in 1963. However, in the UK, Ireland and New Zealand, the cover version by Cilla Black was, and is still, the best loved. Championed by her friends The Beatles, she began her career as a singer in 1963, and her singles "Anyone Who Had A Heart" and "You're My World" both reached number one in the UK in 1964. From the first line, the song has a certain frisson: "Anyone who ever loved, could look at me, and know that I love you." Sadly, Cilla passed away on 1 August 2015 so this is our tribute to a well-loved lady and singer. Our objective has been to interpret the style of the original performance by Cilla, and whilst the time signatures may not be familiar, experience has shown that these are easier to read and play than the alternative using triplets.

  • £35.00

    FINALE from Francesca da Rimini - Tchaikovsky, P - Mcknight, I

    Tchaikovsky's symphonic poem Francesca da Rimini: Symphonic Fantasy afterDante, Op. 32, was composed in less than three weeks during his visit to Bayreuthin the autumn of 1876.  This fantasia presents a symphonic interpretation of the tragic tale of Francescada Rimini, a beauty who was immortalised in Dante's Divine Comedy. Francescada Rimini, a noblewoman, fell in love with her husband's brother. After the loverswere discovered and killed in revenge by the husband, they were condemned toHell for their adulterous passions.   Iain McKnight's arrangement of the exciting Finale was first performed by theLeyland Band at the 2011 Brass in Concert and was used to conclude the band'swinning performance.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £29.95

    Island Whirl - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Island Whirl was commissioned by Margaret Milligan who wanted a brand new piece of music composed as a present for Ian, her husband for his 70th birthday. Ian Milligan is a keen and dedicated musician and he is the musical director of Callendar Brass, based in Callendar near Stirling in Scotland.Margaret contacted me about the possibility of composing a short lively piece which had a Scottish theme that would be ideal for Callendar Brass Band and any other ensemble to get their teeth into. This piece takes its inspiration from the traditional Scottish folk song ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’ which is a particular favourite of both Margaret and Ian.With thunderous Celtic drums the piece opens in a whirlwind of sound with fanfare brass and an off-stage soloist that can perform using either the cornet or trumpet. After the exciting opening, the brass and drums die away to allow the off-stage soloist to air the traditional tune ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’.The beautiful haunting melody, keeping its originality throughout undergoes a series of changes in the accompanying harmonic material before dying away to allow the Celtic drums to return. The percussion whip the band into a frenzy as the piece gets faster and faster. Just prior to the final notes the band diminuendo to allow one last closing statement from the Eriskay Love Lilt lead by the off-stage soloist before the ensemble charge to a dramatic close.When performing this piece I would recommend the off-stage soloist taking a position somewhere in the audience, so they can almost feel part of the performance. In addition, with the two tom-tom parts that represent the Celtic drums, bands should make the most of showcasing them by getting the two drummers out to the front of the band to perform. The ideal stage position would be with the players set up in stereo with one player in front of the soprano cornet and the other in front of the solo trombone.With the various choreographed movements from both the off-stage soloist and the percussionists. This piece is a great addition to any concert repertoire and is an ideal showcase for bands who want to try something a little different.I wish Ian at 70 years young, all the very best with his music making in the many years to come and I hope this piece, composed especially for him and Callender Brass brings them many years of musical enjoyment.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £90.00

    Scottish Dances - Peter Martin - Menno Haantjes

    Scottish Dances is based on three Scottish traditionals: Cock of the North, The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond and Marie's Wedding. I. Cock of the North's name is used for multiple things or events. For example for a locomotive to a famous, it seems, delicious liqueur, and rallies to snowboard competitions. Furthermore is "Cock O' the North " a nickname of a famous Duke. (The 4th Duke of Gordon). In this composition Cock of the North (a Jig) is a traditional Scottish bagpipe tune, regularly played on tattoos by Pipe Bands. Not infrequently the drummers sing the text. Auntie Mary, had a canary, Up the leg of her trousers While she was sleeping I was peeping Up the leg of her trousers. II. " The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond " is about a sad story that took place during an revolt against the British. In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie had to retreat. Two of his men were captured. One was convicted and executed, while the other was released. The spirit of the executed soldier would arrive in Scotland via the 'low road' (underworld) before his companion, who had still a long way to go. You'll take the high road And I'll take the low road And I'll be in Scotland afore ye But me and my true love will never meet again On the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond III. In a Scottish wedding, after the official ceremonies, there is often danced. This is called a ceilidh. For this we use traditional Scottish music such as "Marie's Wedding '. Mid dance we go back to the church, where a lovely song in honor of the couple sounds. Marie's Wedding has been recorded by Van Morrison (among many others). Step we gaely, on we go, heel for heel and toe for toe Arm and arm and on we go, all for Marie's wedding

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £29.99 £29.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    The Gartan Mother's Lullaby | trad. arr. William Hill

    "The Gartan Mothers Lullaby"Dusk is drawn and the Green Man's thorn is wreathed in rings of fog,Siabra sails his boat till morn, upon the starry bog.A leanbhan O, the pale moon hath brimmed her cusp in dew,And weeps to hear the sad sleep-tune, I sing O love of you.A lovely Irish melody from Co. Donegal; the lullaby of a mother to her child. The song refers to a number of figures in Irish mythology, places in Ireland and words in the Irish language.The best known recording of the song was made by Meryl Streep in 2000.

  • £44.00

    All Cried Out - Peter Kleine Schaars

    At the beginning of the 1980s Alison Moyet was discovered by Vince Clarke, who - in search of greater independence - had left the successful band Depeche Mode. The soulful singing style of Moyet and the electronic, innovative pop that Clarke made melded well together in the group Yazoo with hits such as Only You and Don't Go. However, after a number of years Moyet went her own way and forged a solo career, during which she demonstrated a somewhat more traditional sound. She recorded several covers (such as The First Time I Ever Saw Your Face and That Ole Devil Called Love) but she also wrote fine songs herself, such as Love Resurrection and, of course, the expressive song All Cried Out. This arrangement by Peter Kleine Schaars does justice to the atmosphere of the original song.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days