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  • £12.00

    Edward Gregson: The World Rejoicing

    Description**NOTE: PUBLICATION DATES – Band parts (and therefore also “full sets” for The World Rejoicing will now be published as follows:Swiss National Brass Band Championships 2020: TBC, please contact your contest organisersNorwegian National Brass Band Championships 2021: TBC, please contact your contest organisersBritish Open Brass Band Championship 2021: Publication May 2021 following the British Open Spring FestivalNational Brass Band Championships of Belgium 2021: Publication Summer 2021, exact date to be confirmed nearer the timeNational Brass Band Championships of The Netherlands 2021: Publication Summer 2021, exact date to be confirmed nearer the timeGeneral Sale: Publication December 2021 following the conclusion of ALL FIVE rescheduled commissioning contests.Composer’s NoteIn searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cruger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 - that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss's Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated 'in loving memory of my brother', Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    The Rising - Andrew Ford

    To human beings, bush-fires are terrifying and often deadly events. But to the Australian bush, they bring the prospect of regeneration. After the conflagration, comes peace. It is often only a few days after the fire that the first shoots start to appear. Pale green leaves bud on charred branches. Slowly, the Bush renews itself. Over years, even decades, the native vegetation re-establishes itself, the undergrowth becomes thick once more. In effect, of course, the forest is now stockpiling fuel, and if not checked and occasionally cleared, the cycle must continue. The Bush needs fire to survive. These were the images I had in mind when I was composing The Rising. This is what gave me my structure.But, really, the piece might represent any sort of rising - revolutionary or religious, cosmic or simply musical - where a violent event brings peace and then, after a time, too much peace leads to violence. This short work begins with one big bang, then builds inexorably towards another. At the end, it feels as though the piece might begin again (and again (and again)) . . .The Rising was commissioned by the Black Dyke Band and is dedicated to them with respect and great admiration. ? Andrew Ford

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £69.95

    HORN CONCERTO (Gregson) (Horn Solo with Brass Band) - Gregson, Edward

    Horn in F/E flat with Brass BandComposed in 1971 for Ifor James, the Concerto for French Horn and Band revealed some of those elements that have made Gregson’s music so popular with audiences (and not just brass band audiences) worldwide: the boldness of his melodies, with the interval of the fourth revealing his admiration for the music of Paul Hindemith; his incisive rhythms, betraying the influence of another favourite composer, B?la Bart?k; an admirable economy of means; and the clarity of his scoring.Each of the Concerto’s three movements displays a different facet of the French Horn’s character. The first is serious, symphonic in impulse, the rising fourths of the opening gesture giving the music an almost Germanic weight. In the slow movement, the soloist becomes the first among equals, sharing with the cornet soloist some typically haunting melodies. The lyrical flow is interrupted at the mid-point by mysterious, fleet-of-foot cadenzas. A rondo finale brings the concerto to a lighthearted conclusion. The rising fourths here are the impulse for a jaunty theme which reveals another of Gregson’s early influences – William Walton, and in particular that composer’s Partita for orchestra.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.00

    Pre-Order: The World Rejoicing - Study Score - Edward Gregson

    In searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cr?ger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 – that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated ‘in loving memory of my brother’, Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days