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  • £24.50

    The Farewell Symphony - Joseph Haydn - Neville Buxton

    Composed in 1772, Haydn's Symphony No.45, better known as the "Farewell Symphony" due to the circumstances of which it was composed. Haydn's employer, Prince Nikolaus became so attracted to his Eszterhaza Castle, he spent longer and longer there each year. The court musicians were not allowed their families with them and became increasingly depressed. This symphony was composed in such a way, that during the last movement, one by one, each player blew out their candle, and crept of stage. The idea being that the prince would get the subtle hint. The next day, the court returned to Vienna! Arranged in the same way, players able to walk off one by one, a perfect ending to a concert, or first half.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £37.50

    A Carol Symphony (2nd Mov.) - Victor Hely-Hutchinson - Andrew Baker

    This movement "Romance" from Hely-Hutchinson's "Carol Symphony" was used as the theme tune to the BBC's televisions adaption of John Edward Masefield story "Box Of Delights". A superb arrangement for band of a very clever orchestration of popular Christmas carols. An ideal piece for any Christmas concert. Recorded by the Cory Band on their CD 'A Festival of Fanfares & Carols'.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £37.50

    Symphony No.1 (2nd Mov.) - Tchaikovsky - Julian M Blakestone

    "Land of Desolation, Land of Mists" is the title given to the second movement of Tchaikovsky's First Symphony with carries the sub-title Winter Dreams, a theme carried onward by its first two movements. However, those seeking the "misty desolation" of a winter on the steppes will not find it here, for of all Tchaikovsky's symphonies, this one bears the aura of optimism.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £24.50

    Symphony No.1 (1st Mov.) - Beethoven - Julian M Blakestone

    When Beethoven's First Symphony was premiered on April 2 1800, the audience was baffled by the audacity of its composer. Although the work seems, to late 20th century ears, to be little different from the late symphonies of Mozart and especially Haydn. The very opening bars gave notice to the musical world that here was a composer to be watched. Now the first movement has been arranged for full brass band, making the perfect alternative to an overture at a concert.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £24.50

    Largo (From the New World Symphony) - Antonin Dvorak - Andi Cook

    Dvorak's music, is filled with memorable themes and this movement is no exception. For years associated with Bread advert, this arrangement for brass band is simply stunning, creating a warm sound throughout the sections of the band and playable by all levels of band. A perfect item for any concert.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £15.95

    Finale from Symphony No.3 (Organ Symphony) (Brass Band) Additional Parts

    Saint-Saens' magnificent Finale from Symphony No.3 (widely known as the 'Organ Symphony') has here been arranged for brass band with optional organ by Kevin Norbury. It was recorded by The International Staff Band on its CD Manuscripts, although this version has been revised in places. Saint-Saens decided to add the organ and piano to his 3rd symphony as a pragmatic orchestration innovation. The composition of this symphony was probably started in 1885 and a first draft was completed in Prague in 1886. Saint-Saens later recalled its eventful genesis: 'The Symphony in C was three-quarters sketched out when I found it impossible to write the finale. I did not know how to resolve this situation, until one night I suddenly woke up and, in a sort of hallucination, I heard the whole finale, which I hastily wrote down in outline, knowing that if I went back to sleep without having put anything on paper, I would have forgotten it all the next day.' The symphony was first performed under the composer's direction at Saint James's Hall in London on May 19, 1886. This arrangement by Kevin Norbury can both function as a stand-alone brass band piece, and be performed with an organ by omitting the notes found in square brackets in the parts and score. To view a rolling score video please visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlUd_FppBY8 PDF download includes additional parts as listed below. Full set including score available here. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.cimarronmusic.com Difficulty Level: 1st Section + Length: 8.30 mins. Alternative Parts included in this download: Solo Horn F 1st Horn F 2nd Horn F 1st Baritone B.C. 2nd Baritone B.C. 1st Trombone B.C. 2nd Trombone B.C. Euphonium B.C. Tuba 1 B.C. (Bass Eb equivalent) Tuba 2 B.C. (Bass Bb equivalent)

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £107.95

    Symphony in Two Movements (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was jointly commissioned by the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain (NYBBGB) and the National Youth Brass Band of Wales (NYBBW), the latter with funding from T Cerdd (Music Centre Wales), to celebrate their 60th and 30th anniversaries respectively. The first performances were given at Cadogan Hall, London, in April 2012, by the NYBBGB, conducted by Bramwell Tovey; and at the Great Hall, Aberystwyth University, in July 2012, by the NYBBW, conducted by Nicholas Childs.When I was approached about a joint commission to write a new work to celebrate the anniversaries of these two outstanding youth bands I was delighted to accept, and decided to respond by writing a work apposite for the magnitude of these special occasions, namely a 'symphony for brass'.Through a long journey of writing music for brass band, which commenced with Connotations (1977), and continued with Dances and Arias (1984), Of Men and Mountains (1991), The Trumpets of the Angels (2000) and Rococo Variations (2008), I arrived at what I regard as the most important work of the cycle to date, combining as it does serious musical intent with considerable technical demands. It is perhaps my most abstract work for brass band, avoiding any programmatic content.The symphony lasts for some 19 minutes and is structured in two linked movements. The form is based on that used by Beethoven in his final piano sonata (Op.111), which is in two movements only: a compact sonata-form allegro, followed by a more expansive theme and four variations. Prokofiev also adopted this model in his 2nd Symphony of 1925.The opening Toccata of this Symphony is highly dramatic but compact, whilst still retaining the 'traditional' structural elements of exposition, development and recapitulation; indeed, it also has the 'traditional' element of a contrasting second subject - a gentle, lyrical modal melody first heard on solo cornets.In contrast, the longer and more substantial second movement Variations is built around a theme and four variations. The slowly unfolding chorale-like theme accumulates both added note harmony and increasing instrumentation, whilst the four variations which follow are by turn mercurial (fast, starting with all the instruments muted), march-like (menacing, with short rhythmic articulations underpinning an extended atonal melody), serene (a series of 'romances' for solo instruments alongside echoes of the chorale) with an emerging theme eventually bursting into a climax of passionate intent; whilst the final variation is a dynamic scherzo (concertante-like in its series of rapid-fire solos, duets, trios and quartets) with the music gradually incorporating elements of the main ideas from the first movement, thus acting as a recapitulation for the whole work. It reaches its peroration with a return to the very opening of the symphony, now in the 'home' tonality of F, and thus creating a truly symphonic dimension to the music.Most of the melodic material of the symphony is derived from the opening eleven-note 'row', which contains various intervallic sets, and although the work is not serially conceived it does use some typical quasi-serial procedures, such as canons, inversions, and retrogrades. The symphony uses somewhat limited percussion, in line with a 'classical' approach to the sound world of the brass band, alongside a use of multi-divisi instrumentation, whereby each player has an individual part rather than the traditional doubling within certain sections of the band.- Edward GregsonDuration: 19.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £57.95

    Symphony in Two Movements (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was jointly commissioned by the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain (NYBBGB) and the National Youth Brass Band of Wales (NYBBW), the latter with funding from T Cerdd (Music Centre Wales), to celebrate their 60th and 30th anniversaries respectively. The first performances were given at Cadogan Hall, London, in April 2012, by the NYBBGB, conducted by Bramwell Tovey; and at the Great Hall, Aberystwyth University, in July 2012, by the NYBBW, conducted by Nicholas Childs.When I was approached about a joint commission to write a new work to celebrate the anniversaries of these two outstanding youth bands I was delighted to accept, and decided to respond by writing a work apposite for the magnitude of these special occasions, namely a 'symphony for brass'.Through a long journey of writing music for brass band, which commenced with Connotations (1977), and continued with Dances and Arias (1984), Of Men and Mountains (1991), The Trumpets of the Angels (2000) and Rococo Variations (2008), I arrived at what I regard as the most important work of the cycle to date, combining as it does serious musical intent with considerable technical demands. It is perhaps my most abstract work for brass band, avoiding any programmatic content.The symphony lasts for some 19 minutes and is structured in two linked movements. The form is based on that used by Beethoven in his final piano sonata (Op.111), which is in two movements only: a compact sonata-form allegro, followed by a more expansive theme and four variations. Prokofiev also adopted this model in his 2nd Symphony of 1925.The opening Toccata of this Symphony is highly dramatic but compact, whilst still retaining the 'traditional' structural elements of exposition, development and recapitulation; indeed, it also has the 'traditional' element of a contrasting second subject - a gentle, lyrical modal melody first heard on solo cornets.In contrast, the longer and more substantial second movement Variations is built around a theme and four variations. The slowly unfolding chorale-like theme accumulates both added note harmony and increasing instrumentation, whilst the four variations which follow are by turn mercurial (fast, starting with all the instruments muted), march-like (menacing, with short rhythmic articulations underpinning an extended atonal melody), serene (a series of 'romances' for solo instruments alongside echoes of the chorale) with an emerging theme eventually bursting into a climax of passionate intent; whilst the final variation is a dynamic scherzo (concertante-like in its series of rapid-fire solos, duets, trios and quartets) with the music gradually incorporating elements of the main ideas from the first movement, thus acting as a recapitulation for the whole work. It reaches its peroration with a return to the very opening of the symphony, now in the 'home' tonality of F, and thus creating a truly symphonic dimension to the music.Most of the melodic material of the symphony is derived from the opening eleven-note 'row', which contains various intervallic sets, and although the work is not serially conceived it does use some typical quasi-serial procedures, such as canons, inversions, and retrogrades. The symphony uses somewhat limited percussion, in line with a 'classical' approach to the sound world of the brass band, alongside a use of multi-divisi instrumentation, whereby each player has an individual part rather than the traditional doubling within certain sections of the band.- Edward GregsonDuration: 19.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £90.00

    Hobbits (from Symphony No.1: The Lord of the Rings) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - De Meij, Johan

    Johan de Meij's first symphony The Lord of the Rings is based on the trilogy of that name by J.R.R. Tolkien. This book has fascinated many millions of readers since its publication in 1955. The symphony consists of five separate movements, each illustrating a personage or an important episode from the book. This transcription for brass band has been arranged by the composer. The symphony was written in the period between March 1984 and December 1987, and had its premiere in Brussels on 15th March 1988, performed by the The Royal Band ofthe Belgian Guides under the baton of Norbert Nozy. In 1989, the symphony The Lord of the Rings was awarded a first prize in the Sudler International Wind Band Composition Competition in Chicago, and a year later, the symphony was awarded a grant by the Dutch Composers Fund. In 2001, the orchestral version was premiered by the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra. Duration: 9.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £90.00

    Journey in the Dark (from Symphony No.1: The Lord of the Rings) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - De Meij, Johan

    Johan de Meij's first symphony The Lord of the Rings is based on the trilogy of that name by J.R.R. Tolkien. This book has fascinated many millions of readers since its publication in 1955. The symphony consists of five separate movements, each illustrating a personage or an important episode from the book. This transcription for brass band has been arranged by the composer. The symphony was written in the period between March 1984 and December 1987, and had its premiere in Brussels on 15th March 1988, performed by the The Royal Band ofthe Belgian Guides under the baton of Norbert Nozy. In 1989, the symphony The Lord of the Rings was awarded a first prize in the Sudler International Wind Band Composition Competition in Chicago, and a year later, the symphony was awarded a grant by the Dutch Composers Fund. In 2001, the orchestral version was premiered by the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and recorded by the London Symphony Orchestra. Duration: 9.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

     PDF View Music