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  • £89.99

    Journey of the Lone Wolf (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Dobson, Simon

    Championship Section Test Piece for the 2016 National Finals of the British Brass Band Championship.The Lone Wolf of the title is the great Hungarian composer and folklorist B?la Bartok. Bartok's journey took him from the hills of the Balkans to the heart of the new world. His singular vision may have meant a life out in the cold, a life without warmth and love, a life without true happiness, a death mourned by a few in a strange land.The first of the three linked movements is capturing the Peasants' Song and follows the young Bartok and fellow composer Zoltan Kolday as they embark on Summertime adventures through the Hungarian countryside to collect and catalogue the astonishing variety of Gypsy and folk music heard in the Balkan hills. The arrival of WW1 plunges Bartok's beloved Hungary into chaos.Bartok was at times a cold man, aloof and lonely. The occasional moments of tenderness he showed are portrayed in Night Music. His brief but intense affairs speak of a love he could only long for. Jazz is my night music and here there are hints of what Bartok may have heard in the USA later in his life.Having been forced by the world's evils to leave his homeland of Hungary for America Bartok, the anti-fascist, felt isolated and angry. In the finale, Flight and Fight, we hear his longing for a simpler time of Gypsy folk dances as well as his maturity and depth as a composer finally exploring deeper colours and darker themes.Duration: 15.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.00

    O Mio Babbino Caro (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Puccini, Giacomo - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    This famous aria is from the opera Gianni Schicchi. Lauretta, daughter of Gianni Schicchi, has fallen in love with Rinuccio but there are huge tensions between their two families which threaten to keep the young couple apart. The rather discordant music which opens portrays these tensions before giving way to Lauretta's tender appeal to her father to allow her to marry the man she loves. This arrangement was prepared at the request of Brett Baker to be performed with Brass Band Of The Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson, during his visit in May, 2011.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £24.50

    Prevision (Brass Band - Score only)

    The work Prevision has been composed in a free fantasy form. The composer has musically depicted the growing up of his first grandson. Sunk in thought, he sketches his prevision: the development of a small boy growing up to be an adult man. After a brilliant introduction, a slow march follows, which symbolises the first steps toward adulthood. Aspects such as love and a sense of security, that are indispensable for a positive development, are presented in a calm middle section, after which an energetic closing part refers to the rebelliousness of an adolescent. The grand finale of Prevision expresses the grandfather's and composer's positive picture of the future. 10:30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £47.00

    Sunset Serenade (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Sunset Serenade is a tribute by the composer to a music colleague, whose life was unexpectedly cut short. In spite of the sad circumstances of its creation, the music reflects overwhelmingly happy memories and thoughts of gratitude for time spent together and shared experiences. The overall peaceful nature of this composition symbolises a reconciliation with, and acceptance of, the transient nature of man. 05:48

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.99 £29.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    The Gartan Mother's Lullaby | trad. arr. William Hill

    "The Gartan Mothers Lullaby"Dusk is drawn and the Green Man's thorn is wreathed in rings of fog,Siabra sails his boat till morn, upon the starry bog.A leanbhan O, the pale moon hath brimmed her cusp in dew,And weeps to hear the sad sleep-tune, I sing O love of you.A lovely Irish melody from Co. Donegal; the lullaby of a mother to her child. The song refers to a number of figures in Irish mythology, places in Ireland and words in the Irish language.The best known recording of the song was made by Meryl Streep in 2000.

  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear". To view a sample PDF score click here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £132.00

    Abstractions - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    Verket ble bestilt av Norges Musikkorpsforbund som pliktnummer til NM for Brass Band 2. divisjon (na 1. divisjon) 1990.Satstitlene er abstraksjoner der synsopplevelser er tenkt gjenskapt som musikk, altsa en abstrakt fremstilling av et motiv, likt et abstrakt bilde der man ikke umiddelbart kan se likheten.1. Aurora Borealis (Lento espressivo) Inspirert av Nordlyset som kan vaere svaert intenst vinterstid.Det er aldri i ro og antar nye fasonger og farger hele tiden mens det farer over nattehimmelen.The first movement is inspired by the northern lights. It constantly changes in colour and shape.2. Rocks (Moderato ben ritmico)I denne satsen er tittelen et ordspill. Ordet "rock" er velkjent i musikken, men er ogsa en enorm stein eller del av et fjell.The title of the second movement is a play with the word "rock" is a well-known word describing a musical genre. But it is also a giant stone or a part of a mountain.3. Seascape (Allegro)I denne satsen forsoker jeg a fange ulike aspekter ved havet, samtidig som satsen samler opp musikalske ideer fra de to foregaende satsene. Denne satsen videreforer, oppsummerer og avslutter verket.The third movement is inspired by different aspects of the sea. It also sums up different ideas that occurs in the two previous movements to round off the whole piece.Tredje utgave - 2015Third Edition - 2015

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days