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  • £63.00

    Variations on Shalom Chaverim - Andreas Schulte

    Shalom Chaverim is an ancient Hebrew (farewell)song, which was originally sung at the end of a celebration or meeting. It was and is mostly sung as a round. Freely translated the words mean "Goodbye, friends, goodbye and see you again!". The varying moods at a parting have been captured very well by Andreas Schulte in his arrangement 'Variations on Shalom Chaverim'. The composer himself says about the song, 'Although the melody is in a minor key, the overall atmosphere in the song is positive. one wishes each other all the best. Saying goodbye, however, also hurts. When you slow down the pace of the melody and add 'blue notes' in the harmonies, this can be sensed immediately.' Schulte refers here to the first variation. The second variation is very intense with possibly even deeper-felt emotions. 'Variations on Shalom Chaverim' ends on a cheerful and positive note, in fast tempo, and with oriental elements in the melody: 'L'hitra'ot, Shalom' (See you again, and farewell!).

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Trumpets of Jericho - Enrique Crespo - Klaas van der Woude

    This programmatic piece tells the biblical story of the fall of Jericho. The music paints a vivid picture of the procession of armed men and seven priests marching around the city for seven days, before blowing their trumpets and to the cheers of the crowds watching as the walls came tumbling down. A dazzling opening work for any concert.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £53.00

    Introduction - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    The composer: A short concert-opener where I use Norwegian folk-tunes. I wanted to create a short musical picture of the Vikings running from the seashore towards some people they wanted to fight down. They used to drink something made of mushrooms and became very wild. They didn?t feel any pain, they didn?t feel any fear. They where called the Berserkings! Ze voelden geen pijn en kenden geen angst... de Vikingen! Na het drinken van een speciale drank van paddenstoelen konden ze de hele wereld aan. Fraaie Noorse volksmelodieen gebruikend, schetst Aagaard-Nilsen het hero?sche beeld van aanvallende Vikingen. Klaar om de kust te bestormen...

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £83.00

    Golden Eagle - Prof. Hermann Pallhuber

    The eagle has always held a high symbolic value. It stands for freedom, dignity and pride in one's own country. In Hermann Pallhuber's Golden Eagle, the music describes the flight of the eagle along the Tyrolean Mountains, gazing down from on high at the breathtaking landscape below. Let your imagination run free and come fly with us!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £133.60

    Myte - Myth - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    Commissioned by Radoy Brass for their 20 years anniversary. This version was first performed by Manger Skulemusikklag in 2005. The Work is devided into Five Scenes: 1. Sverdet (The Sword) 3:45 2. Advarsel - fra en vis mann (Warning - from a Wise Man) 2:30 3. Dragen (The Dragon) 3:00 4. Advarsel II - fra syngende fugler (Warning II - from singing birds) 1:35 5. Gull - forbannelsen (Gold - The Curse) 2:50 Total durata 13:30 This work is based on five scenes from the tale about "Sigurd Favnesbane" (Sigurd the dragonslayer). Moods and atmospheres in the piece represent my way of retelling the old myth. 1. The Sword The dwarf blacksmith Regin is hammering and sharpening the edges of the magical sword Gram. After three attempts the sword is finally sharp enough to kill a dragon. 2. Warning - from a Wise man Richard Wagners opera Sigfried is based on the same story. In the opera the hero get warned by a wise man. He tells the secret of how to survive an attack of the dragon by hiding in a hole in the pathway and then kill the dragon with the sword as the dragon passes on its way to the river to drink water. 3. Dragon The Dragon (Favne) guards a fantastic treasure, but he is also the brother of the blacksmith Regin. Favne get killed and his blood flows slowly while he laments (trombone/bass trombone). 4. Warning II - from singing birds While frying the heart, Sigurd burns his thumb and put it into his mouth to cool it down. Then he swallow a drop of fresh magic dragon blood which transfers the ability to understand the birdlanguage. The birds sing warnings to Sigurd telling him that Regin will betray him and later kill him. Sigurd then kills Regin instead. 5. Gold - the Curse Sigurd takes the gold treasure and escapes on the horseback of Grane. But his robbery of the gold lead him into trouble: The gold is banned and a curse will hit everyone who takes it... Myth is a programmatic work where the story is quite clearly illustrated throughout the piece: In the first movement you can hear the blacksmith working with hammer on ambolt while the heat is intense from the glows. The dwarf has got his own theme i lower brass (bar 4-5). The hero Sigurd has his own identifying chord (2 bars before F). The chord is also a symbol of the sword. In the second movement the warning from the wise man is expressed in the lyric bass line. The airblow in instruments illustrate the dragon Favne on his way out of his cave, and later the blood flows slowly. The dragon takes his last deep breath after a painful duet in trombones. The birds sing their motifs (lightly, but not cheerful though), until Sigurd cuts the head off Regin and it hits the ground.The last movement describes the atmosphere and state of mind as the curse infects the obsessed thief.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £78.00

    The Devil's Bridge - Bertrand Moren

    The "Teufelsbrucke" (devil's bridge) is a very old bridge connecting the Goschenen and Andermatt valleys in the canton of Uri, central Switzerland. Legend has it that in the 13th century the people of Uri made a pact with the devil to build a bridge across the canyon. When the people only delivered a goat in payment of the soul demanded by the devil he was angry and decided to knock down the bridge. An old woman painted the sign of a cross on the rock the devil was intending to destroy the bridge with and the devil, unable to lift it, disappeared forever. The rock remains to this day at the northern entry of the Gotthard tunnel.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £53.00

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £8.25

    Christmas Colours - Bruce Fraser

    'Christmas Colours' is a palette consisting of several Christmas songs. Bruce Fraser has mainly used the colours green (the colour of holly) and white (the colour of snow). This composition begins with the chiming of festive bells - if you listen well, however, you can already hear short fragments from 'The Holly and the Ivy', whose entire melody is finally played, alternated with 'The Sussex Carol'. After this, the pace slows down and the stately 'See amid the Winter Snow' sounds, but parts from 'Jingle Bells' and 'Silent Night' can also be heard. Then, after walking under 'The Holly and the Ivy' once again, the celebration of Christmas may begin!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £10.50

    Let's Celebrate - Dagmar Kildevann

    Is there something to be celebrated? Then let's play 'Let's Celebrate'! This four-part suite has been based on two birthday songs: the world-famous 'Happy Birthday to you' (which is also sung in many other languages), and the Dutch song 'Lang zal hij/zij leven'. The Fanfare opens in grand style with the motif of 'Lang zal hij leven' and is followed by a cheerful March in which the motifs of both songs can be heard. The third part, Song, forms a moment of contemplation, and the birthday presents are unwrapped by the percussion section in the fourth part, Surprise Party. The yell may be adapted to the occasion. (the sleigh bells caused the composer to note down this somewhat peculiar yell). Of course everybody is expected to join in.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Cowboy Suite - Alan Laken

    In the tripartite 'Cowboy Suite' Alan Laken takes us to the Wild West, the domain of cowboys, indians, trappers and other fortune hunters. Around 1890 the west coast of America was reached, which in effect meant the end of the Wild West. Its stories, however, survived and have been a source of inspiration for many books, films, and, of course, music. Some characters, such as Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and Buffalo Bill are forever linked to these tales. In the 'Cowboy Suite' we first hear the 'Hoedown'. At the end of an exhausting workday the labourers used to lay down their tools, among others the 'hoes' and spontaneously began to play music on the instruments which they then possessed (guitars, fiddles, and banjos) and to dance. After being jolted on the 'Wagon Trail' we reach the third part, the 'Cowboy Roundup'. In this last part it becomes clear that as a cattle driver it is imperative to stay firmly seated in the saddle. As the cattle are rounded up, i.e. driven together, spectacular things happen.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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