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  • £27.50

    Viennese Nights - Strauss, J - Greenwood, JA

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £19.50

    Sobre Las Olas - Juventino Rosas - Chris Gorman

    This is possibly one of the best-known tunes around the world and is speculated to heard in more motion pictures than any other song. However, if you asked someone to "name that tune", then most would probably struggle. This classic Waltz has mistakenly in the past thought to be Viennese and has frequently thought to be the work of Johann Strauss II. The music is the most famous work of the composer and has long been associated in the US with fair ground rides and trapeze artists. This arrangement of the original work by Chris Gorman makes a perfect classical "Overture" work for your concert program.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £74.95

    Vienna Nights - Score & Parts - Philip Wilby

    The City of Vienna stands at one of the historic crossroads of the world, linking east and west and embracing artistic influences from all sides. In the 250th anniversary year of Mozart’s birth, this fantasy on Mozart’s celebrated Piano Sonata in A (K331), has been composed true to the form and content of the original, but also to the underlying substance of the conception.One of Mozart’s distinguishing features, and one that links him to later music by Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler and Schoenberg, is the breadth of his musical vision. His music links intellectual rigour with ecstatic utterance and darker preoccupations. It is, perhaps, this shadow-laden side of his musical nature which gives his work a profundity often absent in the work of his contemporaries. Admirers of his Requiem Mass or the Statue music in Don Giovanni will recognise that it is this extra sense of reality which makes Mozart so relevant to the modern age, and where he may link hands with the other great Viennese thinkers such as Berg, Webern and Adorno.The composer follows the three movement plan of the Sonata closely. The original begins with a Theme and Variations which is freely quoted. His Minuet is mirrored in the Recitative and Notturno, where each section of the band lays down a metaphoric rose to his memory. Famously, the sonata ends in populistic style with a Turkish Rondo. Ever since the Hapsburg-Ottoman Wars, which came to an end in the seventeenth century, Viennese composers have included Turkish elements in their music, not least in the use of certain percussion instruments. Vienna Nights is thusly a homage.It celebrates the world’s greatest composer, but also the city which fostered his work. Here, in your imagination, you might easily conjure up a caf? table near the Opera House, where Mozart, Mahler and Sigmund Freud, observed by us all from a discreet distance, may meet as old friends.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £32.50

    Vienna Nights - Score Only - Philip Wilby

    The City of Vienna stands at one of the historic crossroads of the world, linking east and west and embracing artistic influences from all sides. In the 250th anniversary year of Mozart’s birth, this fantasy on Mozart’s celebrated Piano Sonata in A (K331), has been composed true to the form and content of the original, but also to the underlying substance of the conception.One of Mozart’s distinguishing features, and one that links him to later music by Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler and Schoenberg, is the breadth of his musical vision. His music links intellectual rigour with ecstatic utterance and darker preoccupations. It is, perhaps, this shadow-laden side of his musical nature which gives his work a profundity often absent in the work of his contemporaries. Admirers of his Requiem Mass or the Statue music in Don Giovanni will recognise that it is this extra sense of reality which makes Mozart so relevant to the modern age, and where he may link hands with the other great Viennese thinkers such as Berg, Webern and Adorno.The composer follows the three movement plan of the Sonata closely. The original begins with a Theme and Variations which is freely quoted. His Minuet is mirrored in the Recitative and Notturno, where each section of the band lays down a metaphoric rose to his memory. Famously, the sonata ends in populistic style with a Turkish Rondo. Ever since the Hapsburg-Ottoman Wars, which came to an end in the seventeenth century, Viennese composers have included Turkish elements in their music, not least in the use of certain percussion instruments. Vienna Nights is thusly a homage.It celebrates the world’s greatest composer, but also the city which fostered his work. Here, in your imagination, you might easily conjure up a caf? table near the Opera House, where Mozart, Mahler and Sigmund Freud, observed by us all from a discreet distance, may meet as old friends.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.00

    Vienna Nights - Study Score - Philip Wilby

    The City of Vienna stands at one of the historic crossroads of the world, linking east and west and embracing artistic influences from all sides. In the 250th anniversary year of Mozart’s birth, this fantasy on Mozart’s celebrated Piano Sonata in A (K331), has been composed true to the form and content of the original, but also to the underlying substance of the conception.One of Mozart’s distinguishing features, and one that links him to later music by Beethoven, Schubert, Mahler and Schoenberg, is the breadth of his musical vision. His music links intellectual rigour with ecstatic utterance and darker preoccupations. It is, perhaps, this shadow-laden side of his musical nature which gives his work a profundity often absent in the work of his contemporaries. Admirers of his Requiem Mass or the Statue music in Don Giovanni will recognise that it is this extra sense of reality which makes Mozart so relevant to the modern age, and where he may link hands with the other great Viennese thinkers such as Berg, Webern and Adorno.The composer follows the three movement plan of the Sonata closely. The original begins with a Theme and Variations which is freely quoted. His Minuet is mirrored in the Recitative and Notturno, where each section of the band lays down a metaphoric rose to his memory. Famously, the sonata ends in populistic style with a Turkish Rondo. Ever since the Hapsburg-Ottoman Wars, which came to an end in the seventeenth century, Viennese composers have included Turkish elements in their music, not least in the use of certain percussion instruments. Vienna Nights is thusly a homage.It celebrates the world’s greatest composer, but also the city which fostered his work. Here, in your imagination, you might easily conjure up a caf? table near the Opera House, where Mozart, Mahler and Sigmund Freud, observed by us all from a discreet distance, may meet as old friends.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £32.00

    Harlequin Dances

    Harlequin dances is a stunning original composition showcasing a variety of dance styles. The piece starts with a mambo-like section, then moves into a more romantic ballad-type movement. This then winds up into a Viennese waltz which uses cheeky glissandi, then onto a very clever tempo shift and back to a recap of the mambo music which races along to a thrilling climax.

  • £39.99 £39.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Die Politik | Euphonium & Baritone Duet | Richard Genee arr. Dario Salvi

    Richard Genee, a highly skilled librettist, playwright and composer is one of the lesser known names in the Viennese repertoire, yet his work is justifiably famous. He is best known for his libretto of Die Fledermaus, Johann Strauss II’s most famous operetta, but also wrote many pieces of music in his own right, including the 1876 operetta ‘Der Seerkadet’. Die Politik, subtitled: ‘Politics requires Wisdom and Skill’ was originally a comic duet for two male voices, discovered by Dario Salvi in the US Library of Congress, and arranged here for Euphonium and Baritone Duet with Brass Band.

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  • £34.99 £34.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    I See the Fatherland | Dario Salvi

    Dario Salvi has reconstructed Franz von Suppes operetta ‘Die Afrikareise’ (A Trip to Africa) in a ground breaking project with Winsconsin University and the Strauss Society, which will see the operetta being performed in English for the first time in 100 years. This march for Brass Band brings together themes from the operetta under the title ‘I See the Fatherland’[su_quote cite=”Dario Salvi 2015″]After almost two years of work on the score of the Operetta, during which I extensively worked on preparing a full orchestral score with all the singing parts in English, it is almost time to stage the work. The music from ‘A Trip To Africa’ is full of amazing melodies and interesting ideas. This march for Brass Band is a collection of some of the themes from the Operetta: The "Entrance of Titania" Fanfare leads to one of the most recurring themes, where the singer declares their desire to go back to their Fatherland (in this case Naples) after their visit to the very exotic Cairo; the starting point of their adventure into the heart of the Desert. Exotic sounding yet very Viennese rhythms are the main characteristic of this march. [/su_quote] Instrumentation: Soprano, Solo, 2nd and 3rd Cornets Flugelhorn Solo, 1st and 2nd Tenor Horns 1st and 2nd Baritone 1st, 2nd and Bass Trombones Euphonium Eb and Bb Basses Percussion: 1. Snare Drum 2. Bass Drum, Cymbal, Triangle

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