Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 12 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £94.99

    Scottish Dances - Peter Martin

    Scottish Dances is based on three Scottish traditionals: Cock of the North, The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond and Marie's Wedding. I. Cock of the North's name is used for multiple things or events. For example for a locomotive to a famous, it seems, delicious liqueur, and rallies to snowboard competitions. Furthermore is "Cock O' the North " a nickname of a famous Duke. (The 4th Duke of Gordon). In this composition Cock of the North (a Jig) is a traditional Scottish bagpipe tune, regularly played on tattoos by Pipe Bands. Not infrequently the drummers sing the text. Auntie Mary, had a canary, Up the leg of her trousers While she was sleeping Iwas peeping Up the leg of her trousers. II. " The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond " is about a sad story that took place during an revolt against the British. In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie had to retreat. Two of his men were captured. One was convicted and executed, while the other was released. The spirit of the executed soldier would arrive in Scotland via the 'low road' (underworld) before his companion, who had still a long way to go. You'll take the high road And I'll take the low road And I'll be in Scotland afore ye But me and my true love will never meet again On the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond III. In a Scottish wedding, after the official ceremonies, there is often danced. This is called a ceilidh. For this we use traditional Scottish music such as "Marie's Wedding '. Mid dance we go back to the church, where a lovely song in honor of the couple sounds. Marie's Wedding has been recorded by Van Morrison (among many others). Step we gaely, on we go, heel for heel and toe for toe Arm and arm and on we go, all for Marie's wedding

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £58.10

    Three Scottish Dances - Alan Fernie

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £21.50

    Hogwart's March - Patrick Doyle - George Marshall

    From the fourth installation of the Harry Potter series comes 'Harry Potter & The Goblet of Fire'. This was the first of the Harry Potter films not to be scored by John Williams. Instead, Scottish Composer, Patrick Doyle was handed the gauntlet and he produced a gem of a score that lived up to the magic on screen. Although darker than the previous three films, the light-hearted 'Hogwart's March' featured predominantly at the Triwizard tournament. Now available for band, this work is perfect for band's looking to add a little magic to their programme. Instantly recognisable by the younger players and audience, and a different take on the traditional Brass Band march. To download the Solo Cornet part, please CLICK HERE . To download the Solo Horn part, please CLICK HERE . To download the Solo Euphonium part, please CLICK HERE . To download the playback audio to play along to, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

     PDF View Music

  • £70.00

    Macbeth - Peter Meechan

    Commissioned by the Scottish Brass Band Association for the 2007 Scottish Open Championship, Macbeth takes itsa?? inspiration from the Shakespeare play of the same name. Character portraits (Of the three witches as well as Macbeth himself), abstractions (The lament), and scenes (Macbetha??s final battle with Macduff) make up the nine sections of the piece.i: WitchesThe prophecies of the three witches are an integral part of the play, and in this opening section, these mysterious characters are represented by three different sections of music that introduces the listener to the musical material of the piece.ii: DaggerMacbetha??s a??Is this a dagger I see before theea? speech, where an imaginary dagger leads him to contemplate the pending murder, builds in intensity before the bell tolls at itsa?? conclusion - a sign from Lady Macbeth that Duncan is now alone.iii: General MacbethA character portrait of Macbeth - a fearless General who has led his armies to defeat foes from all over Europe. His ambition and flair that make him such a great General are also the characteristics that lead to his eventual downfall.iv: Contemplations of Lady MacbethAlone and mad, Lady Macbeth ponders all that has gone, before taking her own life.v: LamentAlthough the play tells of Macbeth not feeling the pain of his wifea??s death, this lament ponders not only her death, but the tale as a whole.vi: Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrowIt is in this final soliloquy that we see the ultimate tragedy of Macbeth - the realisation that his life is ultimately worthless.vii: A spell still castThis acts as an prologue to section eight, restating the original a??witchesa? music, before heading into Macbetha??s final battle.viii: Final BattleMacbetha??s final battle, where he locks swords with Macduff.ix: Not of woman bornMacbetha??s realisation that the witches have misled him comes all too late, as Macduff beheads Macbeth, fulfilling the last prophecy.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £45.00

    Bathgate Hills Trilogy - Andrew Duncan

    Composed by Andrew Duncan and written for the West Lothian Schools Band, A Bathgate Hills Trilogy is in three movements, each one dedicated to and representing a different hill.Comments from the composer:Movement 1 – Dechmont LawThe first movement describes the peculiar events which took place in November 1979 when a forestry worker, Bob Taylor, had a close encounter with an alien spacecraft in Dechmont Woods at the bottom of Dechmont Hill. Bob Taylor’s account from the time describes a large sphere like object about twenty feet across which pulled him by the legs towards it, caustic smoke then caused him to pass out. He awoke a short time later in the same spot but the spaceship had gone leaving behind marks in the soil. His story caused a great deal of media interest and a great deal of excitement in the local community.Movement 2 – The Knock HillThe Term ‘Knock’ is Scottish Gaelic for ‘hill’ and the Knock Hill is the highest peak in the Bathgate Hills being 305 metres above Sea Level. On a clear day the Knock hill has excellent views of the Bass Rock to the East and the distant hills of Arran to the West as well as of the whole of West Lothian and across the Firth of Forth to Fife and beyond to the North.The second movement is a description of a leisurely walk to the summit of this hill and the enjoyment of a pleasant summer’s day spent walking and taking in the beautiful panoramic views. However, as is the case with the Scottish Summer, a change in the weather finds a clear blue sky being replaced with dark rain clouds. The changed weather brings a sudden brief but unwelcome cold downpour of rain, drenching anyone out walking! Finally, the clouds pass and the more pleasant summer weather returns.Movement 3 – Cairnpapple HillCairnpapple Hill is a near neighbour of the Knock Hill. It is almost as high but interest in Cairnpapple Hill lies in the outstanding archaeological monument near the summit, an Iron Age burial chamber. The chamber dates back to 25 years BC and was built by a mysterious people known as the Beaker People (so called because they left behind a number of large earthenware beakers). The mysteries of Cairnpapple Hill have always been a source of fascination for me ever since first visiting the hill as a school child.The third movement describes the lives of the Beaker People. The landscape they would have looked out on would have been mostly dense forest which would have contained many perils including dangerous wolves and bears. Life was harsh and short for the Beaker People and they would always have been close to danger and to death. The average life expectancy for the Beaker People was only 31 years of age. The summit of the hill would have been clear of forest and would have afforded the Beaker People some protection as they could see all around the near countryside enabling them to keep a watchful lookout for their enemies – both animal and human!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £49.95

    Argyll Variations - Alan Fernie

    Argyll Variations was commissioned in 2015 by the Scottish Brass Band Association for the National Children's Band of Scotland and premiered by them in Dunblane Cathedral in July that year.There are three elements to the variations, the most important being the fact that they are all constructed from the melody Bonnie Mary of Argyll. Each variation is also named after a location on the A82, the area's main highway.So, we have an angular march for the busy port of Tarbert, a sad and lonely Westport Beach, a neat and ordered minuet for Inveraray, and the twinkling lights over the water as you approach Lochgilphead. The road ends in Campbeltown, where there is always a ceilidh on the go!Each variation also contains a strong element of music that has influenced the composer through the years. Indeed, he is keen for you to work out what these are!

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £124.99

    Suite From Hymn of the Highlands - Philip Sparke

    Suite from Hymn of the Highlands draws three expressivemusical pictures of the Scottish highlands. The first movement,Ardross Castle, contains solo passages for horn andbaritone and features a fascinating bagpipe melody. Thesecond movement, Alladale, is a trio for tenor horn, flugelhorn and baritone with an accompaniment featuring thepercussion section. The final movement, Dundonnell,features two highly contrasting melodies, a wild prestoand the bagpipe melody first heard in the first movement.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £75.00

    Cantata - Andrew Duncan

    A major work composed for brass band by Andrew Duncan. The piece was commissioned by (and dedicated to) The Foden’s Band, and selected as the set work at the 2014 Scottish Open Brass Band Championships, offering an exciting addition to the contesting repertoire.A challenging piece for the players, but one which reaps huge rewards through its rich scoring and imaginative development. A work of three movements, Cantata presents a new dynamic level of its composer’s musical mastery.Listen In – Movement 1 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-1st-Movement.mp3Listen In – Movement 2 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-2nd-Movement.mp3Listen In – Movement 3 (digital sound sample):https://www.themusiccompanyshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Cantata-3rd-Movement.mp3

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days