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  • £25.00 £25.00
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    Charge of the Light Brigade - Andrew Stevenson

    Charge of the Light Brigade tells the story of a battle in the Crimean War, where six hundred members of the light cavalry were sent to attack an Artillery Battery. However, due to miscommunications they were sent to the wrong Artillery Battery, past the original target. The 600 hundred soldiers then found themselves being attacked on two sides because of the error. 156 men lost their lives and another 122 were wounded.The piece follows the structure of the poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson. The fanfare that starts the piece is the exact same used at the battle. The presto is the advance of the Light Brigade towards the Russian guns. The slow passage is a hymn for the men that lost their lives and the finale symbolises the triumphant return of the men that survived, and how the memories of the horrific battle that took place linger on in their minds. Throughout the piece, I have used antiphonal sounds to reinforce the ideas that I have taken from the poem.A recording of the Charge of the Light Brigade is available on the Foden's CD, Patrons' Choice VII (DOY CD329)

  • £21.50

    Battle of Britain - Ron Goodwin - Gavin Somerset

    From the 1969 motion picture comes the overture from the epic war film, The Battle of Britain. The film tells the story of the summer 1940 where the British RAF, outnumbered, yet with radar on their side, strategically defeated the Luftwaffe. Unusually for a film, this picture had two scores composed, one by Sir William Walton and the other by Ron Goodwin. Following a decision made by those in charge at United Artists, only one segment of Walton's score was used to feature during the epic air battle scene. The remainder of the film's music fell to Ron Goodwin's who gave us the now famous title "Aces High" and the main theme. This is a perfect addition to any band programme and one that audiences are sure to enjoy.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £25.00

    The Sword and the Star

    The Sword and the Star was written in 2006 for the Middleton Band at the request of their Musical Director, Carl Whiteoak. The inspiration for the work was the band's badge, which features a medieval archer. The town of Middeton's historical link with the symbol of the Archer came from the English victory at the Battle of Flodden in September 1513, where bowmen from Middleton and Heywood under the command of Sir Richard Assheton played a vital part in crushing the invading Scottish army. Sir Richard captured one of the Scottish commanders and presented the prisoner's sword to the St Leonard's church in Middleton in recognition of the town's contribution. As long time Lords of the Manor, the Assheton family crest was for centuries featured in the coat of arms of Middleton council, and when Middleton became part of the Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale the black star from the Assheton crest was used to represent Middleton in the new borough's coat of arms. Hence the title The Sword and the Star, for a piece which attempts to give an impression of the town as it was then and as it is now.The music is in three short sections – a fanfare, a lament and a bright scherzo – and simply aims to contrast the medieval hamlet of Middleton with the bustling urban centre it has now become. The central lament features a Scottish song called "The Flowers of the Forest", written to mourn the loss of so many of Scotland's young men on the field of Flodden; the song returns in a much more positive form at the end of the piece.To view a PDF preview of the score please click here, and to hear a preview of the opening played by Middleton Band click here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £82.00

    The Saga of Haakon the Good - Score & Parts - Philip Sparke

    The Saga of Haakon the Good was commissioned by Frei Hornmusikk, from Norway, to celebrate the joining of the two neighbouring Kommuner of Frei and Kristiansund, which took place on 1st January 2008. The band used it as their test piece in the Norwegian National Brass Band Championships the following February.The piece traces key events in the life of Haakon the Good (c. 920??"961), later to become King Haakon 1 - THE FUTURE KING - who had been fostered by King Athelstan of England as part of a peace agreement made by his father. The English king brought him up in the Christian religion, and, on the news of his father's death, provided him with ships and men for an expedition against his half-brother Eirik Bloodaxe, who had been proclaimed king of Norway. On his arrival he travelled north - THE JOURNEY TO TRONDHEIM - where he began to gain the support of the landowners by promising to give up the rights of taxation his father had previously claimed.Eirik's sons allied themselves with the Danes, but were invariably defeated by Haakon, who was successful in everything he undertook except in his attempt to introduce Christianity to the country - THE MISSIONARY KING - which aroused an opposition he did not feel strong enough to face.One of his most famous victories was THE BATTLE OF RASTARKALV (near to Frei) in 955. By placing ten standards far apart along a low ridge (to give the impression his army was bigger than it actually was) he managed to fool Eirik's sons that they were out-numbered. The Danes fled and were slaughtered by Haakon's army. These ten standards are represented by ten loud chords starting in bar 420

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.75

    The Saga of Haakon the Good - Score Only - Philip Sparke

    The Saga of Haakon the Good was commissioned by Frei Hornmusikk, from Norway, to celebrate the joining of the two neighbouring Kommuner of Frei and Kristiansund, which took place on 1st January 2008. The band used it as their test piece in the Norwegian National Brass Band Championships the following February.The piece traces key events in the life of Haakon the Good (c. 920??"961), later to become King Haakon 1 - THE FUTURE KING - who had been fostered by King Athelstan of England as part of a peace agreement made by his father. The English king brought him up in the Christian religion, and, on the news of his father's death, provided him with ships and men for an expedition against his half-brother Eirik Bloodaxe, who had been proclaimed king of Norway. On his arrival he travelled north - THE JOURNEY TO TRONDHEIM - where he began to gain the support of the landowners by promising to give up the rights of taxation his father had previously claimed.Eirik's sons allied themselves with the Danes, but were invariably defeated by Haakon, who was successful in everything he undertook except in his attempt to introduce Christianity to the country - THE MISSIONARY KING - which aroused an opposition he did not feel strong enough to face.One of his most famous victories was THE BATTLE OF RASTARKALV (near to Frei) in 955. By placing ten standards far apart along a low ridge (to give the impression his army was bigger than it actually was) he managed to fool Eirik's sons that they were out-numbered. The Danes fled and were slaughtered by Haakon's army. These ten standards are represented by ten loud chords starting in bar 420

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    Over the Stone (Tros y Garreg) - Welsh Traditional

    Over the Stone is a traditional Welsh tune: Tros y Garreg. It is not known when it was written, but the sentiment of the tune is attributed to Rhys Bodychen, who led a troop of Welsh forces at the Battle of Bosworth Field where Richard III was defeated by Henry Tudor in 1485.This skilful arrangement for solo euphonium and brass band by Welshman Tony Small was made for David Childs and it can be heard on the CD Celtic Charm (DOYCD214) on which the performers are David Childs and the Cory Band.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £44.00

    The Yellow Rose of Texas - Amereican Trad. - Inge Sunde

    "The Yellow Rose of Texas" is a traditional American folk song.It has become a symbol of the battle for Texan independence, and is also one of the most famous western songs of all time.Several versions of the song have been recorded, including by Elvis Presley, Willie Nelson and Mitch Miller.This is a Flex-5 SHOWBLOW arrangement, with 5 flexible parts for wind instruments, and additional parts for drums, piano and bass guitar (with chords).The arrangement, by SHOWBLOW arranger Inge Sunde, has a light swinging country & western style. Unexpected key changes togheter with melodic phrases in all instrumental parts make it fun to play.

  • £118.00

    Jack The Giant Slayer - STEINER, Max (Arr.: Moren)

    Jack and Isabelle / Logo Mania / To Cloister / The Battle / Chase to Cloister / The New King Stories

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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