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  • £42.95

    SONGS OF THE GREAT WAR A Medley of Popular Songs 1914-1918 (Brass Band) - Wiffin, Rob

    Music of the Great War is a five year project to use music of the period to educate and engage schools, colleges, town bands, and the wider public across the UK and the world to learn in a positive way about the events, the experience of the troops involved from all sides, and how music played its part.This year, to commemorate the centenary of the Great War a specially arranged medley Songs of the Great War has been created. The medley has been arranged for bands to rehearse and eventually perform on the 11 November 2015. It brings together some of the most popular tunes played, sung and performed by the men and women of the time - in the trenches and on the various home fronts.With the support of many countries and organisations, on the 11 November the medley will be first played in New Zealand and Australia. It will ripple east across the world being performed in countries like India and Pakistan before hitting Europe and onwards to include performances in Canada and the Caribbean. This could become one of the most played pieces of music in a 24-hour period.In Britain, there will be performances across the country, including some at key events and sites involving a wide range of military and non-military personnel.The medley includes: It's a Long Way to Tipperary; Your King and Country Want You; Good Bye-ee; Oh! It's a Lovely War; Hello! Hello! Who's Your Lady Friend; Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty; Mademoiselle from Armentieres; There's a Long, Long Trail A-winding; If You Were the Only Girl in the World; Pack Up Your Troubles (In Your Old Kit Bag); Old Soldiers Never Die/Last Post.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £34.95

    The Covenanters (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, Kenneth

    In 1638, many members of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland signed a document called the National Covenant. By doing so, they were declaring that they acknowledged only Jesus Christ as the spiritual head of their church, and not any king or queen. This had become necessary because the Stuart kings believed in the Divine Right of Monarchs and saw themselves as head of the church. In the previous year, Charles I had forcibly introduced the Book of Common Prayer, invoking the wrath of the common people who faced the threat of torture, transportation or execution if they did not use the new liturgy and worship at their local church. The net result of this was that many met illegally in the countryside or in barns and large houses. These meetings became known as 'conventides' and many took place in the south-west of the country. Anyone caught attending was at risk of execution by the muskets of the dragoons who were employed in the area for that specific purpose. This music was written to honour the bravery and loyalty of these Christians to their faith, in the face of extreme danger, in the hope that it will inspire us also to be faithful. There are overtones of military threat, secrecy and solidarity. An old pentatonic tune is used, which the composer heard as a boy being sung to the words The Lord's My Shepherd.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Covenanters (Brass Band - Score only) - Downie, Kenneth

    In 1638, many members of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland signed a document called the National Covenant. By doing so, they were declaring that they acknowledged only Jesus Christ as the spiritual head of their church, and not any king or queen. This had become necessary because the Stuart kings believed in the Divine Right of Monarchs and saw themselves as head of the church. In the previous year, Charles I had forcibly introduced the Book of Common Prayer, invoking the wrath of the common people who faced the threat of torture, transportation or execution if they did not use the new liturgy and worship at their local church. The net result of this was that many met illegally in the countryside or in barns and large houses. These meetings became known as 'conventides' and many took place in the south-west of the country. Anyone caught attending was at risk of execution by the muskets of the dragoons who were employed in the area for that specific purpose. This music was written to honour the bravery and loyalty of these Christians to their faith, in the face of extreme danger, in the hope that it will inspire us also to be faithful. There are overtones of military threat, secrecy and solidarity. An old pentatonic tune is used, which the composer heard as a boy being sung to the words The Lord's My Shepherd.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £30.00

    The Magic Flute Overture - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Phillip Littlemore

    Mozart’s The Magic Flute is a two–act opera composed in 1791, the year of his death. It was the culmination of a period of increasing involvement by Mozart with Emmanuel Schikaneder's theatrical troupe, which since 1789 had been the resident company at the Theater auf der Wieden. The Magic Flute is noted for its prominent Masonic elements; both Schikaneder and Mozart were believed to be Masons and also lodge brothers. Much of Mozart’s Masonic music is written in the key of E flat. This key, with 3 flats is indicative of Masonic symbolism. There are other examples of the number three in the opera as well. The opening chords of the introduction sound three times, which also happens during the Temple scenes. Also represented in threes are the three temples of Wisdom, Reason and Nature. Tamino tries to open the three doors of the temple. There are three ladies, the attendants to the Queen of the Night, and three boys who serve as guides to Tamino and Papageno. Mozart evidently wrote the music while keeping in mind the skills of the singers intended for the premiere, which included both virtuosi and ordinary comic actors, asked to sing for the occasion. Thus, the vocal lines for Papageno and Monostatos are often stated first in the strings so the singer can find their pitch, and are frequently doubled by instruments. In contrast, Mozart's sister-in-law Josepha Hofer, who premiered the role of the Queen of the Night, needed no such help — indeed this role is famous for both its technical difficulty and range. Item Code: TPBB-008 Duration: c.6'30"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £7.99

    The ISB at Abbey Road

    1Cobham HallLieut.-Colonel Norman BearcroftThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army3.232The Great PhysicianDudley BrightThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army2.193We'll All Shout HallelujahNorman AudoireDerick Kane (Euphonium) with The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army5.204A Finnish SuiteCaptain Robert RedheadThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army7.095Consecration HymnW. H. Jude arr. Leuit.-Colonel Ray Steadman AllenThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army3.226HarlesdenLieut.-Colonel Ray BowesThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army2.327The Firing LineBruce BroughtonThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army2.418The Children's SongRobert SchrammThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army1.589Keep in StepNoel JonesStephen Cobb, Gordon Hughes and Derek Alcock (Cornets) with The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army3.5710Victory for Me!Wilfred HeatonThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army4.2911Just As I AmWilfred HeatonThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army5.0612Exeter TempleMajor Leslie CondonThe International Staff Band of The Salvation Army4.01

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    On the Castle Green - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    I was contacted by conductor and friend Desmond Graham who wanted to have a traditional concert march composed to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of his band; The Third Carrickfergus Band.Immediately my mind started wandering as I thought about all the great marches that I have enjoyed playing and listening to over the years. So when I put pen to paper I had already planned out the structure of the march and which instruments to feature.The march itself is split into two halves, the first in a minor key the second in a major key. The opening section starting loudly in F minor features stereotypical passages one would come to recognise in a traditional concert march: a cornet solo, a melodic bridging section and a robust bass solo led by the basses and trombones.The second half of the march changes pace and mood as it lifts into a major key giving it a more lighter feel. We hear a second cornet solo which plays the second theme of the march. After a second bridge section the theme is played by the front row cornets to allow the soprano to play an obligato melody similar to that heard in marches like “Army of the Nile” and “Stars and Stripes Forever”. It all builds to a grandioso ending where the tempo drops and the final theme is played with a quick accel to the end.As for the title? In Carrickfergus lies an old castle that faces the town which is situated on a small plot of luscious green grass – “On The Castle Green”.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Platform to the Heavens - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The piece takes its inspiration from the mountain ranges from one of my favourite countries, Switzerland.I have visited the Swiss Alps on many occasions and I am still taken back by its sheer awesome beauty with every visit. This commission gave me the opportunity to pay homage to this wonderful landscape and paint my own musical picture of it.The piece opens with what I imagine daybreak would be like at one of its many peaks. With the sun growing behind the mountain range, the piece builds from a single note to a huge climatic chord revealing Mother Nature’s creation.Then at rehearsal figure ‘C’ the tempo changes dramatically as we fly through the many slopes of the mountains as if on a manic skiing expedition, revealing the many dangers within the Swiss Alps.The twists, turns and climaxes begin to die away as we enter rehearsal figure ‘M’ - nightfall over the mountains. As the sun disappears, the sky darkens to reveal the beautiful starlit sky above the mountain range. This middle section starts with the various cadenzas that serve as echoes around the Alps. It then leads to a lyrical solo at rehearsal figure ‘O’ as the moonlight illuminates the icy mountain peaks. A final cadenza to conclude this section highlights the end of nightfall as the sun starts to rise again.This recapitulation from the opening, signals a new dawn as the sun rises above the snowy peaks once again. The music at this point in its slightly altered state highlights the dawn of a new day in the Alps. The fast manic ski ride follows which takes the piece to its grand finale conclusion.The idea behind the title of this piece is that the Swiss Alps are so beautiful and vast; I can only imagine that they could be a platform connecting the earth to the heavens above.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days