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  • £34.99

    Take Five (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Desmond, Paul - Sykes, Steve

    The classic jazz number 'Take Five' was first recorded by the Dave Brubeck Quartet and released on its 1959 album Time Out. Composed by Paul Desmond, the group's saxophonist, it became famous for its distinctive, catchy melody and use of quintuple time, from which the piece got its name. This brass band arrangement, by Steve Sykes, captures the jaunty slant of the original.Suitable for Advanced Youth/3rd Section Bands and aboveDuration: 4.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99

    Take Five (Score & Parts) (Brass Band) - Dave Brubeck

    The classic jazz number was first recorded by the and released on its 1959 album . Composed by Paul Desmond, the group's saxophonist, it became famous for its distinctive, catchy melody and use of quintuple time, from which the piece got its name. This brass band arrangement, by Steve Sykes, captures the jaunty slant of the original.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £9.99

    Take Five (Score) (Brass Band/Score) - Dave Brubeck

    The classic jazz number was first recorded by the and released on its 1959 album . Composed by Paul Desmond, the group's saxophonist, it became famous for its distinctive, catchy melody and use of quintuple time, from which the piece got its name. This brass band arrangement, by Steve Sykes, captures the jaunty slant of the original.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Off Duty - John Dankworth - Len Jenkins

    The late John Dankworth (1927-2010) made a string of recordings in the 1960s that have since come to be regarded as some of the finest British jazz of their time. Amongst these is his composition 'Off Duty' which was recorded in the 1960s when the influence of pop and rock on jazz was at its height and instruments such as the bass guitar were beginning to be incorporated into jazz's vocabulary. At this time and almost subconsciously, a Dankworth 'pop' style also evolved. This was a balanced marriage between jazz and pop which is here demonstrated in 'Off Duty' thanks to the ingenious and original orchestration by John Dankworth, and the faithful arrangement for Brass Band by one of his fans, Len Jenkins. The title is interesting as John loved to play with words. 'Off Duty' could mean relaxing away from work, but could also carry the implication of something not attracting taxation.... a sort of 'duty-free'. About the same time, the Dave Brubeck Quartet produced the seminal 'Take Five'... so could this be John's take on that title, suggesting a short break? Which meaning fits best for you? The piece would best suit the capabilities of a brass band playing at the standard of Third Section or above.

  • £63.00

    The Heart of Lithuania - Jacob de Haan

    Composer Jacob de Haan has based The Heart of Lithuania on five folk melodies from Lithuania, a country that despite its small size has a rich cultural heritage. The choice and diversity of emotions, largely determined by the characteristic melodies, take the listener straight to the heart of the Lithuanian people.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £42.95

    SONGS OF THE GREAT WAR A Medley of Popular Songs 1914-1918 (Brass Band) - Wiffin, Rob

    Music of the Great War is a five year project to use music of the period to educate and engage schools, colleges, town bands, and the wider public across the UK and the world to learn in a positive way about the events, the experience of the troops involved from all sides, and how music played its part.This year, to commemorate the centenary of the Great War a specially arranged medley Songs of the Great War has been created. The medley has been arranged for bands to rehearse and eventually perform on the 11 November 2015. It brings together some of the most popular tunes played, sung and performed by the men and women of the time - in the trenches and on the various home fronts.With the support of many countries and organisations, on the 11 November the medley will be first played in New Zealand and Australia. It will ripple east across the world being performed in countries like India and Pakistan before hitting Europe and onwards to include performances in Canada and the Caribbean. This could become one of the most played pieces of music in a 24-hour period.In Britain, there will be performances across the country, including some at key events and sites involving a wide range of military and non-military personnel.The medley includes: It's a Long Way to Tipperary; Your King and Country Want You; Good Bye-ee; Oh! It's a Lovely War; Hello! Hello! Who's Your Lady Friend; Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty; Mademoiselle from Armentieres; There's a Long, Long Trail A-winding; If You Were the Only Girl in the World; Pack Up Your Troubles (In Your Old Kit Bag); Old Soldiers Never Die/Last Post.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £46.00

    Montage (Score only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £56.00

    Montage (Parts only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £94.00

    Montage - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries.The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated.A chaconne follows – the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement’s structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne’s continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles.The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon.The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days