Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 6 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £35.00

    Mars, The Bringer of War - Phillip Littlemore

    Holst first became interested in astrology around 1912/13 and so began the gestation for a series of pieces that would utlimately become the suite The Planets . The suite itself was written between 1914 and 1916 and with the exception of Mercury , which was written last, Holst wrote the music in the sequence we now know them, and thus did not present the inner planets of Mercury, Venus and Mars in their planetary order. So, in 1914, came the insistent rhythmic tread of Mars, The Bringer of War . It is widely known that the sketches were completed prior to the outbreak of the First World War, so the music is less a reaction the the declaration of war itself, but more an impending sense of inevitability of a war to unfold. Even though Holst would not have known whether war would be declared as he wrote the music, it is almost certain that the news at the time would have had some influence on the music itself. Its insistent 5/4 rhythm, coupled with the winding melody line, the juxtaposition of keys such as D flat and C major all point to a sense of forboding. Item Code: TPBB-050 Duration: 7'20" Grade: 1st Section and above

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £69.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £35.00

    A Manchester Tale - Andrew Duncan

    This stunning piece depicts life in the City of Manchester in the years surrounding the Second World War and the effect these years had on the citizens of Manchester. It’s a striking work, with creativity and colour, overflowing with emotion and atmosphere. For maximum effect, it even includes an optional part for a wartime siren which announces the start of an air raid attack.Winner of ‘Best New Work’ at Spennymore Brass Band Contest in 2000 (played by the Grimethorpe Colliery Band conducted by Garry Cutt), and featured on the Sellers Band CD, Celtic Connections.Look and Listen (performance courtesy of RNCM Brass Band at Unibrass 2018):

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £19.50

    Codebreakers - Len Jenkins

    A great march, dedicated to the memory of those who worked at Bletchley Park, Milton Keynes, England, in World War 2. They were under the brilliant leadership of Alan Turing and were responsible for breaking the secret military codes used by the Enemy Forces (German in particular). The composer, Len Jenkins, lives close to Bletchley Park, went to school even closer, and attended Training Courses actually in 'The Park'. The march has memorable themes and is toe tapping for the audience.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £19.50

    Hut Six - Len Jenkins

    A great march (perfect for contests such as whit Fridays) dedicated to the memory of those who worked at Bletchley Park, Milton Keynes, England, in World War 2. They were under the brilliant leadership of Alan Turing and were responsible for breaking the secret military codes used by the Enemy Forces (German in particular). The composer, Len Jenkins, lives close to Bletchley Park, went to school even closer, and attended Training Courses actually in 'The Park'. The march has memorable themes and is toe tapping for the audience.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £64.99

    Bread and Games - William Vean

    'Panem et Circenses', Bread and Games were essential for keeping the citizens of ancient Rome in check. While the bread was meant for the poorest among the Romans, the Games were Popular Pastime Number One for everybody.There were different kinds of games, such as chariot races (especially popular with female spectators), or wild-beast fights, where lions, tigers, bulls or bears were set on one another or even on human beings. Most popular, however, were the Gladiator fights. In 'Bread and Games' William Vean depicts one of the many fights in the antique Colosseum. 1. Entrance of the Gladiators: By powerful bugle-calls the attention of the peoplewas asked for, after which the Gladiators entered the Arena at the sound of heroic marching-music.2.Swordfight: We can hear that the fights were not mere child's play in this part.On the contrary, they were a matter of life and death and were fought accordingly.3.Mercy of the Emperor: Sometimes a wounded gladiator could be fortunate, depending on the mercy of the audience. Waving one's handkerchief meant mercy, a turned-down thumb meant no pardon. The Emperor had the right to take the final decision, but he usually complied with the wish of the majority of the public. 4.Lap of Honour: Gladiators were mainly selected among slaves, convicted criminals, or prisoners of war. Consequently, winning was very important, as it would mean fame, honour and sometimes even wealth. A lap of honour, therefore, was the winner's due reward.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music