Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 8 matches for your search

Results

  • £35.00

    Strictly Come Dancing - D. McGrath & J. Phillips - Christopher Wormald

    The very catchy, lively theme tune to the BBC's hugely popular TV series "Strictly Come Dancing" now availble for your brass band to perform - a great entertainment number for your next concert.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

     PDF View Music

  • £24.95

    Wheal Breage - Terry Reed

    The Cornish word Wheal strictly means "a place of work" but it is usually thought of as meaning a mine, because all Cornish mine names were prefixed by the word Wheal. The composer is the MD of Breage & District Silver Band and this march is dedicated to both his band, based in the village of Breage, Cornwall, and to the great Cornish mining heritage. Breage Parish had a number of successful tin and copper ore mines, some of which started in the 16th and 17th centuries and lasted until the end of the 19th century. Cornish Brass Bands and Male Voice Choirs were formed by the miners and have had a long association with the mining communities around Cornwall.Wheal Breage starts off in a jolly way to reflect the mining youth's carefree life outside of mining. At Section C, the march modulates to a minor key, reflecting the hard, industrious nature of mining; you can almost hear the Beam Engine Houses pumping the water out of the mines. At Section D, there is a dramatic time signature change from 6/8 to 4/4, followed in the Trio at Section E, by an original melody which was written to reflect and remember the men (and children) who tragically lost their lives in many mining accidents that occurred over a number of centuries. Section F is a joyful coda, reflecting the past Cornish Miners' Gala Parades which were headed by a Cornish Brass Band.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £99.99

    The Divine Right - Philip Harper

    At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new countrys people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving manynations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.My music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted. Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including my own, the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads.The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer, a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.The music descends to emptiness. The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering,irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times. This defining episode in Englands history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote: Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant. Philip Harper, 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £72.99

    30 Original Chorales and Warm-ups - Philip Sparke

    These 30 Original Chorales and Warm-Ups have been designed to develop the most important aspects of band playing, by providing material that can be used at the start of a rehearsal to test balance, dynamics, tuning, flexibility and articulation. Band directors are encouraged to adapt them to address the specific needs and challenges of their ensembles. Dynamics and tempo indications are not given and should be chosen by the director as required. All the chorales are strictly four-part. This multi-purpose collection is an essential purchase for every ambitious band!

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Berlioz, Hector - Wright, Frank

    Berlioz's opera Benvenuto Cellini was first produced in Paris in 1838 but was withdrawn as a failure, and it was not until the production in Dresden in 1888 that it was finally acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story, laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century, is not strictly historical. The short opening Allegro, marked deciso con impeto, is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilising full instrumentation. In the Larghetto we meet at once the first of the opera themes ??" the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaptation of Teresa's aria (Act I). Towards the end the Cardinal theme is re-introduced by trombones, fortissimo against an energetic cornet and euphonium passage (senza stringendo ??" without hurry, says the score). After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden, dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the Cardinal theme. A simple molto crescendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

     PDF View Music

  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini (Brass Band - Score only) - Berlioz, Hector - Wright, Frank

    Berlioz's opera Benvenuto Cellini was first produced in Paris in 1838 but was withdrawn as a failure, and it was not until the production in Dresden in 1888 that it was finally acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story, laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century, is not strictly historical. The short opening Allegro, marked deciso con impeto, is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilising full instrumentation. In the Larghetto we meet at once the first of the opera themes ??" the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaptation of Teresa's aria (Act I). Towards the end the Cardinal theme is re-introduced by trombones, fortissimo against an energetic cornet and euphonium passage (senza stringendo ??" without hurry, says the score). After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden, dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the Cardinal theme. A simple molto crescendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

     PDF View Music

  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini (Brass Band - Score only) - Berlioz, HectorArranger:

    Berliozs opera Benvenuto Cellini was first produced in Paris in 1838 but was withdrawn as a failure, and it was not until the production in Dresden in 1888 that it was finally acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story, laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century, is not strictly historical. The short opening Allegro, marked deciso con impeto, is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilising full instrumentation. In the Larghetto we meet at once the first of the opera themes " the Cardinals aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaptation of Teresas aria (Act I). Towards the end the Cardinal theme is re-introduced by trombones, fortissimo against an energetic cornet and euphonium passage (senza stringendo " without hurry, says the score). After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden, dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the Cardinal theme. A simple molto crescendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Berlioz, HectorArranger:

    Berliozs opera Benvenuto Cellini was first produced in Paris in 1838 but was withdrawn as a failure, and it was not until the production in Dresden in 1888 that it was finally acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story, laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century, is not strictly historical. The short opening Allegro, marked deciso con impeto, is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilising full instrumentation. In the Larghetto we meet at once the first of the opera themes " the Cardinals aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaptation of Teresas aria (Act I). Towards the end the Cardinal theme is re-introduced by trombones, fortissimo against an energetic cornet and euphonium passage (senza stringendo " without hurry, says the score). After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden, dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the Cardinal theme. A simple molto crescendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days