Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 5 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £12.00

    Edward Gregson: The World Rejoicing

    Description**NOTE: PUBLICATION DATES – Band parts (and therefore also “full sets” for The World Rejoicing will now be published on 1 May 2021. The rights to the premiere performances in all five commissioning countries remain with the commissioning contests and bands are requested to respect these rights.Composer’s NoteIn searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cruger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 - that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss's Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated 'in loving memory of my brother', Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £12.00

    The World Rejoicing (Brass Band - Study Score) - Gregson, Edward

    In searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cr?ger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 – that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated ‘in loving memory of my brother’, Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £24.95

    Prelude and Capriccio (Cornet Solo with Brass Band) - Gregson, Edward

    A condensed score is included with this workGregson wrote his Prelude and Capriccio in 1972. It exists in two versions: one for cornet and band and the other for cornet or trumpet and piano.The work began life in the early sixties, the Capriccio being composed when the composer was 17. A Prelude was added to complete the work, which lasts for approximately 8 minutes. The Prelude is reflective in character and uses long melodic lines over undulating chromatic harmony. The music reaches a climax before a brief reprise of the opening. The Capriccio is somewhat jazzy in its opening syncopated rhythms, but has a more lyrical middle section before a finale exploiting the virtuoso character of the instrument.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days
  • £24.95

    Prelude and Capriccio (Cornet Solo with Brass Band) - Gregson, EdwardCode:

    A condensed score is included with this workGregson wrote his Prelude and Capriccio in 1972. It exists in two versions: one for cornet and band and the other for cornet or trumpet and piano.The work began life in the early sixties, the Capriccio being composed when the composer was 17. A Prelude was added to complete the work, which lasts for approximately 8 minutes. The Prelude is reflective in character and uses long melodic lines over undulating chromatic harmony. The music reaches a climax before a brief reprise of the opening. The Capriccio is somewhat jazzy in its opening syncopated rhythms, but has a more lyrical middle section before a finale exploiting the virtuoso character of the instrument.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £9.95

    First Quartet (Brass Quartet - Score and Parts) - Gregson, EdwardCode:

    My first Brass Quartet was written in 1968, immediately after I finished my studies at the Royal Academy of Music, and was in response to a request from my then publisher, R Smith & Co, to write some chamber music for brass band instruments. It is scored for two cornets, horn and euphonium. In the same year I also wrote another quartet (No. 2) which is scored for the more unusual combination of two horns, baritone, and tuba. The First Quartet is really a miniature in terms of length, lasting less than six minutes. However, it packs a lot of punch in its two connected movements, a Prelude and a Capriccio. The Prelude is lyrical in style and opens with a rising figure (covering a major seventh) on euphonium answered by muted cornets. These ideas form the material for the movement which is arch shape in structure. The opening returns, immediately followed by a transition passage which leads directly into the turbulent Capriccio. This is rather Bartokian in style (I was very influenced by Bartok in my student days and had closely studied his six string quartets), in the manner of a Hungarian dance in 5/8 time. The constantly changing metric patterns give the music a rather disruptive quality, but also an opportunity for the players to show their virtuoso abilities. - Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days