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  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.50

    Polish Adventures - Gavin Somerset

    Composed for the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield after their trip to Poland in the summer of 2003. This work reflects the different parts of the tour in four continuous movements... PROGRAM NOTES AS THEY APPREAR ON SCORE COVER I don't wish to ramble on with the program notes, do I do believe that if you know the story behind a piece of music, it just puts that extra something into the players performance. In 2002, the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield, embarked on a 10 day tour of Poland. The group spent 28hrs on a couch packed with instruments, only to arrive finding Poland experiencing its worst summer in 70 years. In 2003, they decided to go back for another go! This time, luxury all the way, no 28hr coach journey, just a 1 1/2hr flight. This piece tells the story of the 2nd tour of Poland in four continuous movements... First the introduction. Early one morning, prepared for the drive to the airport, everyone tired, but excited. A day prior to this, some parents of the children set off in a van driving the instruments to the hotel, some 300 miles away. Bar 13 introduces the "Van" theme. Once arriving at the airport, the movements begin... 1. MORNING FLIGHT A very self explanatory part of the piece, and impressionist in its writing. Flying high over England and the channel, giving a sense of speed we were travelling at (compared to the poor lads in the van somewhere below us!) The Largo before F tells of the short coach journey to the hotel, and settling into what was our new home for 10 days. 2. IN THE STORM The weather was definitely an improvement on last year. So much so, that it became a regular event of the day to go and play rounders in a nearby field. This particular day however, with everyone concentrating hard on the game, it escaped everyone's attention that there was a very large storm creeping over the high mountain range near us. As the title of the movement suggests, the scene involved 25 of us running as fast as we could back to the hotel. Unfortunately, the heavy rain ran faster than us. 3. LAST MEMORIES As most of the people in the band were 18 this year, it was apparent that this would be their last event with the band. Many of the group had grown up together for the last 7 years and so, as the tour came to a close, there was a sense of sadness in the air, but everyone would always have the memories. 4. FINALE & HOME The van and the brave volunteers that went with it, set off the day before the rest of us flew home. This last movement reflect the whole tour, bringing back all the main themes from the different movements before arriving back at the school, just in time to see the van pull up. The "Van" theme makes its presence heard again towards the end. This piece was performed by the Wind Band at the leaving concert of many of the players in the band. I dedicate this piece to the band which is still functioning with new players, and to all those who took part on this tour.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £91.00

    Clann Lir - Stijn Aertgeerts

    Clann Lir - Stijn Aertgeerts - 8'30'' - BVT123 THE CHILDREN OF LIR: AN IRISH LEGEND There was a time in ancient Ireland when the people believed in magic and in druids and spells. These were the days of the Tuatha De Danann tribe, the Goddess Danu and of Lir, the lord of the sea. Lir's wife, Eva, had given him four beautiful children. The two eldest, Fionnuala and Aodh, went swimming in a small lake. But these were no ordinary swimmers! They possessed gills for breathing and webbed feet as they were, after all, the offspring of 'the ruler of the land beneath the waves'. They met a messenger who told them that they were wanted by their father. They went home immediately only to find their father disturbed. 'What is wrong father?' they enquired ‘your mother has given birth to twins' he replied ‘....and has gone off to rest' 'What do you mean father?' they asked Lir explained that this was what humans called 'death' but that since they were immortal that their mother had gone to recover, possibly for a thousand years or more. The children were to look after the new brothers, Fiachra and Conn. The children kissed their mother for the last time and then left. As the children grew Lir's spirits declined until one day he met Aoife, the sister of his wife. Aoife was possessed of magical powers and soon enough it was known that she and Lir would marry. The new family thrived under the influence of their new mother but not for long as guilt and jealousy about the children's real mother took its toll on Aoifes health. She fell into sickness for a year but recovered only to start to become old before here time. Aoife was a changed woman now and one day suggested that she and the children should visit their grandfather. On the journey they stopped by a lake and she encouraged the children to go for a swim. The four children played happily in the water, not noticing that their stepmother was now standing at the water’s edge wearing her father’s magic cloak. 'For too long you children have stood between your father and I, but not for much longer!' she cried'We cannot be killed by you...' Aodh replied, ‘...we are the Children of Lir and if you harm us our ghosts will haunt you!' 'I’m not going to kill you.....' she shouted ‘......but I am going to change you!' At this she bowed her head and started an incantation. The children looked at each other in fear as they saw a red and gold circle envelope them on the water. They saw Aoife open up her cloak from which the great light of a fireball emerged and hurtled towards them, burning all in its wake. The fireball hit the water and caused masses of steam to rise about the children and they soon lost all feeling in their legs, arms, shoulders and head. They soon regained their sight only to see Aoife laughing at them. Aodh tried to attack her and flailed his arms about furiously but nothing happened except the splashing of water. He turned to look at his brothers and sister only to see that they had all been turned into the most beautiful swans ever seen. Aoife scowled at them again and told them that they were to spend nine hundred years as swans, three hundred on Lough Derravaragh, three hundred on the Straits of Moyle and three hundred on the Isle of Inish Glora. To end the spell they would have to hear the bell of the new God. -'I leave you with your voice however, and the most beautiful singing ever heard' she said. Clann Lir was Commisioned by K.F. De Vrije Vlaamse Zonen (Kapelle-op-den-Bos)Percussion parts assisted by Sam Coenen

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £34.95

    The Rising - Andrew Ford

    To human beings, bush-fires are terrifying and often deadly events. But to the Australian bush, they bring the prospect of regeneration. After the conflagration, comes peace. It is often only a few days after the fire that the first shoots start to appear. Pale green leaves bud on charred branches. Slowly, the Bush renews itself. Over years, even decades, the native vegetation re-establishes itself, the undergrowth becomes thick once more. In effect, of course, the forest is now stockpiling fuel, and if not checked and occasionally cleared, the cycle must continue. The Bush needs fire to survive. These were the images I had in mind when I was composing The Rising. This is what gave me my structure.But, really, the piece might represent any sort of rising - revolutionary or religious, cosmic or simply musical - where a violent event brings peace and then, after a time, too much peace leads to violence. This short work begins with one big bang, then builds inexorably towards another. At the end, it feels as though the piece might begin again (and again (and again)) . . .The Rising was commissioned by the Black Dyke Band and is dedicated to them with respect and great admiration. ? Andrew Ford

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days