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  • £21.50

    I Left My Heart In San Francisco - Cross & Reed - Neville Buxton

    This much loved ballad have been arranged as a Euphonium solo by Neville Buxton. Released by Tony Bennet, it became a gold-selling Top Ten hit that stayed in the charts almost three years. With intricate band parts and an unforgettable solo line, this arrangement will bring back the memories of the 60's to your concert audience.Free solo part available on request. Email - [email protected]

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £46.20
  • £46.20

    I Left My Heart In Switzerland - Christoph Walter

    F Alphorn Solo with Brass Band

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £46.20

    I Left My Heart In Switzerland

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.00

    Why Left I My Hame - Faulds, J - Greenwood, JA

    Includes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Rondeau - Jean-Joseph Mouret - Len Jenkins

    It is quite popular to have a bright trumpet piece for the Bride and Groom to process from church following a wedding ceremony. I chose this one for my recent wedding and Len arranged it for brass quintet and organ. In many cases it is desirable to have the brilliance of brass for this type of occasion, but balance, space and budgetary considerations can make a full band too much in each of these respects. A quintet provides the best balance with the organ, can be fitted into the available space in church (or wherever the ceremony is to be held), and may be easier and more economical to organise. The music is a classical rondeau taken from the first Suite de Symphonies by the French composer Jean-Joseph Mouret, and is one of the less well known, but nevertheless brilliant piece as befits the occasion. Organ registration has not been detailed but left to the discretion of the Organist. As each organ is different it is felt that they are best placed to decide, in consultation with the leader of the brass ensemble, what stops and set-up will project the required sound and achieve the best balance.

  • £29.95

    Flame of Independence - Dan Price - -

    Given as a gift to the United States of America from the people of France, The Statue of Liberty is one of the most recognizable icons of the United States world-wide, and is also a universal symbol of freedom and democracy.Dedicated on October 28, 1886, The Statue of Liberty commemorates the centennial of the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence and is a gesture of friendship from France to the United States.Standing on Liberty Island in New York Harbour, the 305 feet tall, copper-clad statue is that of a robed woman holding a torch. It is made from sheet copper (which gives it, its distinctive colour) over a framework of steel, with the exception of the torch flame which is coated in gold leaf. It stands on top of a rectangular stonework pedestal with a foundation in the shape of an irregular eleven-pointed star.The figure is derived from Libertas, ancient Rome's goddess of freedom from slavery, oppression, and tyranny. Her left foot, fitted in Roman sandals, tramples broken shackles, symbolizing freedom from oppression and tyranny, while her raised right foot symbolizes Liberty and Freedom refusing to stand still. Her torch signifies enlightenment. The tablet in her hand represents knowledge and shows the date of the Declaration of Independence--July 4, 1776. The seven spikes on the crown represent the seven seas and seven continents. Visually, 'Liberty' appears to draw inspiration from Greek Sun-god Helios, and I have drawn my inspiration from 'Liberty'.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton - -

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days