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  • £44.95

    The Final Voyage - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The Final Voyage was commissioned by Carole Crompton on behalf of Bolsover District Council.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £40.00

    The Final Countdown - Joey Tempest - Ron Sebregts

    This number 1 hit for the Scandenavian band Europe has been expertly arranged for Brass Band by Ron Sebregts. Let the Countdown begin !

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from IMAS Music

    Fanfare for the Future - Andrew Stevenson

    Fanfare for the Future was commissioned by the organisers of the annual Madhurst Brass Festival 2012 to open the final concert. The title pays homage to the James Watson Memorial Fund, the choice charity of the event, which gives opportunities to young brass players. The piece opens with an epic fanfare featuring the cornets and trombones and the remaining instruments join gradually. The music then shifts gear into an exciting, fast tempo. This section features different time signatures, tricky technical passages and some of the initial motifs from the start return. The music then slows down for a melodic euphonium solo followed by a cornet solo which gradually builds to an emotional climax. The music gains tempo for a final sprint to the end, where the music finishes with a climax of rich chords and fanfares.

  • £44.95

    The Golden Apples of the Sun - Rodney Newton - -

    This work was commissioned in 2012 by the percussionist, Yasuaki Fukuhara, and takes its title from the final verse of W.B.Yeats' poem, The Song of Wandering Aengus;Though I am old with wandering,Through hollow lands and hilly lands,I will find out where she has gone,And kiss her lips and take her hands;And walk among long dappled grass,And pluck till time and times are done,The silver apples of the moon,The golden apples of the sun.This piece does not seek to follow the narrative of the poem, but rather takes lines from it as an inspiration for three contrasting movements.The first movement, Through Hollow Lands and Hilly Lands, is in the form of a dogged march over a repeated bass line, featuring tom-toms, snare drum and cymbals playing rhythms associated with rock drumming. At the end of the movement, the marimba enters with material that will be heard in the next movement.The second movement, The Silver Apples of the Moon, features vibraphone, glockenspiel and crotales, as well as the dobachi (a resonant bronze bowl of Japanese origin). The music is delicate and ethereal.In contrast, the final movement, The Golden Apples of the Sun, is energetic and fiery, featuring tubular bells, timpani and other tuned percussion instruments including cowbells.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £119.00

    Between the Two Rivers - Philip Sparke

    Between the Two Rivers was commissioned by Fanfare 'Prins Hendrik', from Aalst in the Netherlands. The title derives from the fact that the town of Aalst lies between two tributaries of the River Dommel. The community is a highly religious one, so the famous Luther chorale, Ein' Feste Burg, was an obvious choice for Philip Sparke to use as the theme for this new work. It takes the form of a theme with four contrasting variations. Variation 1 is a moto perpetuo, variation 2 has a slower march like feel, variation 3 is a sinister slow movement and the final variation is in the form of a lyrical fugue. Between The Two Rivers is sure to become a major work in modern brass band repertoire.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £83.00

    The African Connection - Carl Wittrock

    Carl Wittrock's wide interest in global folk-music resulted in this concert-piece based on original African rhythms. Obviously, the percussion section has a conspicious role to play, but the band too may indulge itself in moments of thoroughly delightful excitement. The introduction depicts the awakening of nature, and develops into a dance. The (main) motif of this dance is from a dance entitled Apollo and comes from Gambia. Its accompaniment consists of an ostinato pattern by balaphon-master Maudo Susa. The quiet middle movement is based on the rhythm of the 'gigbo' : a traditional dance from Ghana. In the final movement -which also bears a slight resemblance to a theme from 'The Lion King'- the so-called 'Kono' rhythm is used. The work is played most advantageously using djembes. Challenge and please your percussion section with 'The African Connection'.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £48.00

    The Craftsmen - Christian Bouthier

    The energetic activities of three craftsmen at a local crafts market inspired the composer Christian Bouthier to write this work in three movements. The clockmaker gets many curious visitors at his stand. He patiently and proudly shows the precision work of his beautiful clocks and lets all of them tick - the small ones and large ones. The cooper (barrel-maker) skillfully puts together fine-looking, sturdy barrels of the best types of wood. From afar, you can hear the cooper hammering. In the final movement things are hectic at the blacksmith because the local horse-riding society has just arrived. Many horses are provided with new shoes. The experienced blacksmith hits the horseshoes into the proper shape on his anvil; now the horses can spiritedly trot and gallop on the way back. A fascinating new addition to the concert band repertoire.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £25.00

    The Cistercians

    DescriptionThe Cistercianswas written during December 2003 and January 2004 as an entry for Morecambe Band's Centenary New Music Competition, which it went on to win. The first two performances were at the final of this competition, part of the band's 100th Anniversary Concert at The Dome in Morecambe on 9 July 2004.The music was inspired by visits to three of Britain's great Cistercian Abbeys; Valle Crucis, Fountains and Rievaulx. The Cistercian Order was founded at Citeaux in France in the 11th Century and was based on the principles of austerity, humility and piety. Cistercian Abbeys were deliberately sited in remote, difficult areas. Despite this many of them, especially Rievaulx, became immense centres of commerce and power, with ever more complex administration and hierarchies.In a way the music reflects this; all the material in the piece is derived from two simple motifs played by flugel and solo horn in the opening bars and becomes more complex and further removed from the original material as the piece develops. After a tranquil opening section a fugal chorale develops over a medieval-style "tenor" - a stretched out version of one of the original motifs. A burst of semiquavers leads into a faster, folk-dance type section - our medieval abbey has become a bustling trade centre - before rhythmic quaver pulses in the horns and cornets accompany powerful chords in the low brass; this is another "tenor" derived from the opening motifs. A short development section, including the folk dance "hocketing" round the band and a slightly disjointed 10/8 section leads to a restatement of the fugal chorale from the beginning before a frenetic coda brings the work to a triumphant conclusion.Performance Notes:Percussion instruments required are Bass Drum, Suspended Crash Cymbal, Glockenspiel, 2 x Tom-toms, Snare Drum, Tambourine, Tam-Tam, 2 x Timpani (G-C, C-F), Triangle, Wood Block. All cornets will require metal stratight mutes and all except soprano require cup mutes. All trombones require cup and metal straight mutes.Playable by 2nd section upwards; to view a sample PDF file of the score click here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £34.95

    The Smoke That Thunders - Andrew Wainwright - -

    David Livingstone was a Scottish missionary and explorer. From 1841 until his death in 1873, Livingstone explored the interior of central and southern Africa. His initial aim was to spread Christianity and bring commerce and ‘civilisation' to these regions, but his later missions were more concerned with exploration. This piece of music tells the story of the part of his journey that led to him discovering Victoria Falls.The work starts out in optimistic fashion, with the Scottish folk-song A Man's a Man for a', by Robert Burns, which Livingstone reportedly used to hum on his travels. The troubles and difficulties of his journey were great and the next section describes his battles with the local African tribes, who were suspicious of his motives.After surviving these assaults, numerous bouts of African fever and several skirmishes with wild animals, a more reflective section ensues, which describes the doubts Livingstone had about continuing his mission. This is epitomised by the hymn Lord, Send Me Anywhere, which Livingstone himself wrote.After much deliberation and prayer, Livingstone decided to carry on and the final section describes his journey along the Zambezi River, the triumphant sounds eliciting his elation at discovering the magnificent Victoria Falls, or as it is known by the locals, "Mosi-oa-Tunya", The Smoke That Thunders.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days