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  • £42.95

    SONGS OF THE GREAT WAR A Medley of Popular Songs 1914-1918 (Brass Band) - Wiffin, Rob

    Music of the Great War is a five year project to use music of the period to educate and engage schools, colleges, town bands, and the wider public across the UK and the world to learn in a positive way about the events, the experience of the troops involved from all sides, and how music played its part.This year, to commemorate the centenary of the Great War a specially arranged medley Songs of the Great War has been created. The medley has been arranged for bands to rehearse and eventually perform on the 11 November 2015. It brings together some of the most popular tunes played, sung and performed by the men and women of the time - in the trenches and on the various home fronts.With the support of many countries and organisations, on the 11 November the medley will be first played in New Zealand and Australia. It will ripple east across the world being performed in countries like India and Pakistan before hitting Europe and onwards to include performances in Canada and the Caribbean. This could become one of the most played pieces of music in a 24-hour period.In Britain, there will be performances across the country, including some at key events and sites involving a wide range of military and non-military personnel.The medley includes: It's a Long Way to Tipperary; Your King and Country Want You; Good Bye-ee; Oh! It's a Lovely War; Hello! Hello! Who's Your Lady Friend; Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty; Mademoiselle from Armentieres; There's a Long, Long Trail A-winding; If You Were the Only Girl in the World; Pack Up Your Troubles (In Your Old Kit Bag); Old Soldiers Never Die/Last Post.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £40.00

    Things to Come - Phillip Littlemore

    The 1936 science fiction film Things to Come was written by H G Wells and starred Raymond Massey and Ralph Richardson. It was based on the author’s 1933 novel The Shape of Things To Come , an elaborate prophecy of world war, disease, dictatorship and, finally, a utopia. ? It was Wells himself that approached Bliss to write the music for the film, although Bliss had no experience of writing for this medium. Wells believed that the music was integral and not to be added later, and so several sections of the score were completed before shooting and some of it was used intact. Whether the producer, Alexander Korda, had agreed to this is unclear but, inevitably, some of the music was edited under the watchful eye of Muir Mathieson, who was involved in the project as music director and also working on his first major film. ? Some six months before the release of the film Bliss created an extensive Suite for the BBC, and conducted two-thirds of the special recording sessions himself. Some of the original manuscripts and material from those sessions subsequently disappeared and are now lost. The later concert suite, from 1940 and dedicated to H G Wells, includes six movements of which four have been arranged in this brass band transcription. ? Sir Arthur Bliss (1891–1975) Bliss was one of the most important figures in British musical life from the early 1920s through to his later years when he was Master of the Queen’s Music. He wrote over 140 works for every combination of voice and instrument including large scale orchestral works, operas, ballets, film scores, chamber works, songs and music for brass band. He was composing right up to his death at the age of 83. ? H G Wells (1866–1946) Wells was a writer of science-fiction which also explored social topics of class conflict to evolution. He became a literary sensation almost overnight when his first novel, The Time Machine , was published in 1895. This was followed in quick succession by The Island of Doctor Moreau , The Invisible Man and The War of the Worlds . As an internationally recognised author he travelled extensively gaining notoriety for his radical social and political views. Today he is often referred to as the ‘Father of Science Fiction’. ? Item Code: TPBB-070 Duration: 10’55” ?

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £112.00

    March Slav - Tchaikovsky

    March Slav was composed in 1876 for a charity concert to support the war in the Balkans. It was completed in the remarkably short time of 5 days and was encored twice at its first performance! The themes are based loosely on Serbian folk songs and there is also a reference to the Russian national anthem. The mood is funereal in style at the opening but this gives way to a very triumphant style by the end.This arrangement was prepared for the 2007 Summer concerts of Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson (www.bbwesternreserve.org). It has been recorded by BBWR on the CD Slides Rule!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days