Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 2 matches for your search

Results

  • £24.95

    Mists on the River Wear - Dan Price

    Mists On The River Wear is a ‘song and dance' for solo tuba. It was commissioned in 2010 by the Black Dyke Band's solo Eb Bass player and international tuba star Joseph Cook.The SongThe work opens with unaccompanied tuba announcing a three note motif which is the basis for the entire work. The accompaniment enters in broken cluster chords which emulate the mist gliding on the river at early morning. The mist clears and the river motif appears on tenor horns whilst the tuba melody flows above.Geographically, the River Wear passes past Durham Cathedral and Durham Castle as it works its way through the city and to reflect this musically there is an element of a renaissance dance in the centre of this movement in an attempt to capture the historic and physically dominating presence of these buildings within the city.As the movement draws to a close there is a passage of light scoring which enables the soloist to demonstrate their ability at performing multi-phonics, a haunting sound which is eventually engulfed by the sound of the river broadening out as it travels on its journey.The DanceIn contrast to the lyrical first movement, this second movement showcases the versatility of the instrument and the agility of the soloist in a lively dance.The dance begins in compound time and echoes the style of an English jig which represents the energetic life you find in the university city of Durham. There is a deliberate quote written into the theme of the jig which comes from the 1st Movement of Ralph Vaughan-Williams' Concerto for Bass Tuba, which Joseph and the composer share a fondness towards.A brief return to the riverside opening material of the piece quickly leads us into a pseudo "Jazz" waltz, where cross rhythms between soloist and accompaniment gives the melody a sense of disjointedness and ambiguity. However, the music soon flows back into a reprise of the jig with a closing cadenza section that brings Mists On The River Wear to a close.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days