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  • £27.50

    Brasiliera (from Scaramouche) - Milhaud, D.

    Brazilian popular music is increasingly heard in Europe and this kind of fast swaying dance music is instantly identifiable as Latino. Except that this particular piece was composed by a Frenchman, Darius Milhaud, while he was working in Brazil for the French diplomatic service in the early 20th century. This is just one of many of his Brazilian inspired pieces, but is certainly the best known.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £44.00

    Hava Nagila - Philip Sparke

    Hava Nagila (the title means 'let us rejoice') is perhaps the best known example of a style of Jewish music called 'klezmer'. Klezmer music originated in the 'shtetl' (villages) and the ghettos of Eastern Europe, where itinerant Jewish troubadours, known as 'klezmorim', had performed at celebrations, particularly weddings, since the early Middle Ages.'Klezmer' is a Yiddish term combining the Hebrew words 'kley' (instrument) and 'zemer' (song) and the roots of the style are found in secular melodies, popular dances, Jewish 'hazanut' (cantorial music) and also the 'nigunim', the wordless melodies intoned by the 'Hasidim' (orthodox Jews).Since the 16th century, lyrics had been added to klezmer music, due to the 'badkhn' (the master of ceremony at weddings), to the 'Purimshpil' (the play of Esther at Purim) and to traditions of the Yiddish theatre, but the term gradually became synonymous with instrumental music, particularly featuring the violin and clarinet. The melody of Hava Nagila was adapted from a folk dance from the Romanian district of Bucovina. The commonly used text is taken from Psalm 118 of the Hebrew bible.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £19.50

    Hail, Smiling Morn! - Reginald Spofforth - Sam Fisher

    For bands around the Yorkshire region, this title immediately conjures up images of Christmas and local carols, particularly in Sheffield. The song is a glee written in the early 19th Century by Reginald Spofforth and usually sang at both Easter & Christmas, has recently seen its popularity grow across the nation. Sam Fisher has taken the lively 6/8 dance and created a concert march from the raw material that fits the more traditional brass band march format.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £40.00

    The Irish Dancemaster - William Vean

    During the eighteenth century a person called 'the Dance Master' made his appearance in Ireland. He was a travelling dance-teacher, who moved from one village to another to teach the people there how to dance. They were often flamboyant personalities, gorgeously dressed and holding a staff in one hand. In order to teach their pupils the difference between their right and left leg, the dance master used to tie a small bunch of straw or hay to their leg and then would order them to either lift their 'hay-leg' or their 'straw-leg'. The dancing masters used to stay in one particular village for about six weeks (if they were not claimed by a neighbouring village), after which they continued their journey. Having a famous dance master gave a village a certain distinction and did not seldom lead to boasting and pride. Also on account of the popularity of Celtic music in general at the moment, William Vean was inspired to writing 'The Irish Dance Master'. He 'teaches' you two dances, the Reel and the Jig. In between these two dances there is a short breathing space, during which a traditional Irish rhythm can be enjoyed.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £69.95

    IN LEAGUE WITH EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN (Concerto for Euphonium) - Peter Graham

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concertos three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations. The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle). The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detectives final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down lndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey Around the World in Eighty Days (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloists technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloists increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009. Available MultiMedia Files

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £69.95

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band) - Graham, Peter

    Concerto for EuphoniumIn League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concerto’s three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations.The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle).The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detective’s final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down l?ndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story – have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey “Around the World in Eighty Days” (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloist’s technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloist’s increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £70.00

    Danceries (Set II)

    Danceries Set II continues the format established with the previous Danceries (1999) by using tunes and dances from Playford’s 17th Century Dancing Master to form the basis of an extended dance suite. In this set, the melodies have become more abstracted and project only a distant echo of their original forms. As before, each movement is self-contained, colourful and direct, with its own distinct mood. The outer movements, Jennie’s Bawbee and Peascod’s Galliarda , share driving percussion with an almost military air. Tom Tinker’s Toye and Heart’s Ease , the second and third movements, are both settings of original melodies. All movements are more extended than in the first set, with a freer use and approach to the material, supported by a greater variety of harmonic colouring. The result is a richer, even more exhilarating set of dances.? Item Code: 0-571-57077-1 Duration: 15'00"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days