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  • £35.60

    CELEBRATION DAY - Lienhard Christian

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £19.60
  • £44.50

    The Covid Collection - Gavin Somerset

    This exciting new 22-minute concert suite for Brass Sextet has been composed during the months of lockdown charting the feelings of a nation, with seven movements playable by 6 (or more) players. The music was composed with the intention for players to perform either together live in a small group, in isolation by way of a virtual performance (downloadable backing tracks are available to play along to) and ultimately, to give players something to enjoy as we all miss our brass band families. This concert suite is the perfect addition to all bands' libraries at a time when rehearsals are limited. Several of the movements are already in preparation for a full band edition to be released at a later date: (also available as a digital download worldwide - purchase now & print to play). Bands purchasing this sextet edition will be eligible for a discount on the upcoming full brass band edition of the concert suite. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Movement 1: FANFARE: The Call of the Band - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK This opening fanfare gives way to a full of life and energy. With catchy melodies and harmonies, it is an effective opening to any concert programme and the perfect way to begin the Suite. Movement 2: March of the Antibodies - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A cheeky little number that keeps on fighting though. Whilst not a March in the traditional brass band sense, players should aim to give a 'happy' performance of this movement ensuring smiles all around for both performers and the audience.Movement 3: Solidarity - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK The first slow movement of the concert suite aims to reflect on the isolation many of us felt during the time of lockdown. However, during these times, walks out with loved ones allowed many to connect and enjoy downtime, not often afforded to many. Movement 4: Lazy Days - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A movement whose title really does say it all. A laid back swing number that should be played in an as relaxed manner, as possible!Movement 5: Hymn for Carers (Dedicated to the NHS & Care Workers) - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK Dedicated to the NHS & Care Workers, this hymn tune is filled with emotional highs and lows, felt by many of the hospital and care staff who worked tirelessly to keep our people safe, with a timely nod at the end to Vera Lynn & our missed VE day commemorations. Movement 6: Army of the Keyworkers - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A stirring work in 12/8 which rightfully, depicts our heroes who kept the country moving through the most difficult of times. An heroic number for players to enjoy.Movement 7: CELEBRATION: Return of the Band - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK Little needs to be said about this movement, as at this time of release, we cannot yet celebrate the return of all players to the band rooms across the country. However, when that time comes, this movement is to be played with the joy of normality we shall all feel. CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FULL SUITE BACKING TRACK ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Each movement can be performed as a standalone item, or form part of the full 22-minute concert suite. Sextet scored for: x1 Cornet I in Bbx1 Cornet 2 in Bb1x Flugelhorn1x Tenor Horn in Eb1x Euphonium/Baritone in Bb1x Eb Bass*extra parts included are, Cornet parts in Eb & C, Horn in F, Euphonium/Baritone in BC, Trombone (TC and BC), BBb Bass in TC & Tuba in BC.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £189.95

    'The New Christmas Collection' - Full Set March Card Size

    The new Christmas Collection carol books contain all the traditional Christmas Carols, with some new 'pop' music arrangements included to add more variety to your carolling this year.

     

    * Note, these are not compatible with the New Christmas Praise books.

    Full list of works in The Christmas Collection:-

    • A child this day is born
    • A Christmas lullaby
    • A great and mighty wonder
    • All I want for Christmas is you
    • All my heart this night rejoices
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Come and worship)
    • Angels, from the realms of Glory (Iris)
    • Angels we have heard on high
    • A starry night
    • As with gladness men of old
    • Auld lang syne
    • A virgin most pure
    • Away in a manger (The manger scene)
    • Away in a manger (Traditional)
    • A winter’s tale
    • Bethlehem
    • Brightest and best (Spean)
    • Brightest and best (Traditional)
    • Calypso Carol
    • Carol for the Nativity
    • Carol of the bells
    • Carol of the drum
    • Child of Mary
    • Christians Awake!
    • Christ is born (Il est né)
    • Christ was born on Christmas Day
    • Come and join the celebration
    • Come, children, come quickly
    • Coventry Carol
    • Deck the hall
    • Ding dong! merrily on high
    • Do you hear what I hear?
    • Frosty the snowman
    • Gabriel’s Message
    • Gaudete
    • Glory in the highest
    • Glory in the highest Heaven
    • God of God, the uncreated
    • God rest you merry, gentlemen
    • Good Christian men, rejoice
    • Good King Wenceslas
    • Go, tell it on the mountain!
    • Happy Christmas (War is over)
    • Hark the glad sound!
    • Hark! the herald angels sing
    • Have yourself a merry little Christmas
    • Here we come a-wassailing
    • How far is it to Bethlehem?
    • Huron Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • In the bleak midwinter (Cranham)
    • In the bleak midwinter (Darke)
    • I saw mommy kissing Santa Claus
    • I saw three ships come sailing in
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Traditional)
    • It came upon a midnight clear (Willis)
    • It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas
    • It’s the most wonderful time of the year
    • I wish it could be Christmas everyday
    • I wonder as I wander
    • Jesus, good above all other
    • Jingle Bells
    • Jingle bell rock
    • Joy to the world!
    • Last Christmas
    • Let it snow!
    • Little baby Jesus
    • Little children, wake and listen
    • Little Donkey
    • Little Jesus, sweetly sleep
    • Lo! he comes with clouds descending
    • Long, long ago
    • Love came down at Christmas
    • Mary’s boy child
    • Mary’s Child
    • Masters in this hall
    • Merry Christmas everyone
    • Mistletoe and wine
    • Noel
    • O Christmas tree
    • O come, all ye faithful
    • O come, Immanuel
    • O Heaven-sent King
    • O holy night!
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Christmas Carol)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (Forest Green)
    • O little town of Bethlehem (St Louis)
    • Once in royal David’s city
    • Past three o’clock
    • Patapan
    • Personent Hodie
    • Praise ye the Lord
    • Ring the bells
    • Rise up, shepherd!
    • Rockin’ around the Christmas tree
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • Sans day carol
    • Santa Claus is comin’ to town
    • Saviour’s Day
    • See, amid the winter’s snow
    • Silent Night!
    • Sleigh Ride
    • Softly the night is sleeping
    • So here it is, merry Christmas
    • Stars are shining
    • Still, still, still
    • Stop the cavalry
    • Sussex Carol
    • Sweet chiming bells
    • Sweet chiming Christmas bells
    • The candle song
    • The cherry tree carol
    • The Christmas song
    • The first Nowell
    • The holly and the ivy
    • The infant King
    • The light has come
    • The shepherds’ farewell
    • The stable door
    • The star in the east
    • The twelve days of Christmas
    • The virgin Mary had a baby boy
    • They all were looking for a king
    • Thou didst leave thy throne
    • Three kings’ march
    • Unto us a boy is born
    • Walking in the air
    • We gather round the manger-bed
    • We three kings of Orient are
    • We wish you a merry Christmas
    • What child is this?
    • When a child is born
    • When Santa got stuck up the chimney
    • Whence is that goodly fragrance flowing?
    • When wise men came seeking
    • While shepherds watched (Cranbrook)
    • While shepherds watched (Handel)
    • While shepherds watched (Winchester Old)
    • White Christmas
    • Who is he?
    • Winter Wonderland
    • Worldwide Christmas message
    • Zither Carol
    • A starry night
    • Christmas Joy
    • Christmas Praise
    • Coventry Carol
    • Infant Holy
    • Mid-winter
    • Rudolph, the red-nosed reindeer
    • The everlasting light
    • To celebrate his birth
    • Yuletide Rag

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £79.95

    The Lost Village of Imber (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bond, Christopher

    The Lost Village of Imber was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in 2019 in celebration of 160 years of the band; 1859-2019. Structured in three movements, the complete work was premiered by Cory Band at Wiltshire Music Centre in February 2020.The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains.Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order.The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness, a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects, the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church.The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life.In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks, sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community, both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story.Duration: 13.30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £79.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated dispatch 5-10 working days
  • £53.90

    A Renaissance Christmas (Brass Band) Kevin Norbury

    VIEW SCORE PDF This magnificent festive suite was written by Kevin Norbury for the Pierre Elliott Trudeau High School Wind Symphony and features several well known carols set in a Renaissance style. Here it has been set for brass band. Three contrasting movements comprise the work: i. Processional (Personent hodie - On this day earth shall ring) This is a short piece imagining a torchlight Yuletide procession (perhaps bearing the traditional roasted wild boar), using a well-known Christmas melody from the large collection of music compiled in the 16th century called Piae Cantiones (1582). The tune is presented twice with accompanying, related melodic material. ii. Pastorale (Quem pastores laudavere - Shepherds sang their praises o'er him) This is a 14th-century melody which was originally collected by Michael Praetorius at the end of the 16th-century. The treatment throughout is very lyrical without overly complex harmonies. The melody is heard three times with brief linking episodes and a short coda. iii. Celebration! (In dulci jubilo - In sweet celebration - Ding-dong merrily on high)) This magnificent 13th-century melody was also a part of Michael Praetorius's collection. It is traditional associated with the words 'Good Christian men, rejoice!' The opening is a straight transcription of the great chorale prelude for organ by J.S.Bach. After the grandeur of the opening, the tune is heard in more of a 'folky' style. A lot of related melodic material is then presented before the tune Ding-dong merrily on high is heard. After another episode of previously used music In dulci jubilo reappears in a joyful conclusion to the piece. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 3rd Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb Repiano Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb 3rd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Percussion 1-4

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £34.95

    The Puffing Devil (Vocal Solo)

    For Children's Choir and Brass BandThe Puffing Devil (2013) was commissioned by Camborne Trevithick Day Committee on the occasion of Camborne's 30th Trevithick Day celebration. The premiere performance of the work, written for brass band and children's choir, saw a massed performance by six brass bands and children from nine local schools. With the intention of being an educational work as well as a musical work, The Puffing Devil reflects the story of Richard Trevithick both in the lyrics and the musical material. A mysterious opening sees running semiquavers in the euphoniums as the flugel horn introduces the work with a solo, before the entry of the horns playing rhythmic quavers. The addition of the voices at the outset is for effect - working with the instruments to create the sound of a steam engine gathering pace simply to the words 'Trevithick'. Once a steady tempo is reached, themes are introduced and sung by the choir, where the vocal writing is a very simple singular-melody; easy for any primary school aged children to learn. An ending of grandeur in a majestic nature is presented, to create a big finish to a feel-good educational work.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £99.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations (Score and Parts)

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm's passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold's own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold's style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work's structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold's music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer's personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there - and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you 'up front'! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues - a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed - this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score - there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm's own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a 'sunshine- affair' and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £49.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations (Score Only)

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm's passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold's own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold's style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work's structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold's music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer's personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there - and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you 'up front'! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues - a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed - this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score - there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm's own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a 'sunshine- affair' and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days