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  • £83.00

    The Seventh Night of July - Itaru Sakai - Marc Jeanbourquin

    In Japan, July the 7th is a holiday known as Tanabata, for which large celebrations are held throughout the country. The holiday is based on a legend about a young man and a young woman who are separated by the Milky Way and can only see each other once a year on this night. The Seventh Night of July is Itaru Sakai's musical interpretation of this romantic legend. The flugel horn and euphonium solos during the middle movement represent the two main themes from the legend.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £85.99

    The Seventh Night of July (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sakai, Itaru

    In Japan, July the 7th is a holiday known as Tanabata, for which large celebrations are held throughout the country. The holiday is based on a legend about a young man and a young woman who are separated by the Milky Way and can only see each other once a year on this night. The Seventh Night of July is Itaru Sakai's musical interpretation of this romantic legend. The flugel horn and euphonium solos during the middle movement represent the two main themes from the legend.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £35.00

    Calon y Ddraig / The Heart of The Dragon (2012) - Matthew Hall

    Calon y Ddraig (Heart of the Dragon) was commissioned by the Tredegar Town Band to finish their Brass in Concert programme at the 2012 contest held at The Sage, Gateshead. Using 2 traditional Welsh folk songs (Dacw ‘Nghariad, Y Deryn Pur) along with 2 favourite Welsh hymns (Calon Lan, Cwn Rhondda) and the national anthem (Mae hen wlad fy nhadau), Calon y Ddraig typifies the spirit found in every man, woman and child from the Principality combining to create a rousing finale to any programme.https://matthew-hall.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Heart-of-the-Dragon-LTTB-.mp3

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £10.50

    Durkle Bandrydge Suite - Bruce Fraser

    Durkle Bandrydge is the name of the composers imaginary world, but it could very well be anyones invisible dream world with a different name. In this very versatile suite by Bruce Fraser, 8 characters are featured, each with its own peculiarities, making Durkle Bandrydge such a colourful place. Do these characters differ that much from us? That is for you to find out! In the last part, all characters come together in a special way.Durkle Bandrydge exists at the end of your street. It is invisible to humans, but Durkle Bandrygators can watch us with great interest. The music will introduce you to some of the characters who live in this unusual place. The parts: Somnanbulyss, who is a giant troll guarding the entrance to Durkle Bandryde. At least, he is supposed to, but he tends to sleep most of the time. His music is therefore very slow moving and sleepy. Long Gwysteen is a tall, mysterious, and somehow sophisticated character, who walls around with a shell on his back. His music glides along rather gracefully. Squelfitch is a rather unpleasant and smelly character who lives in a bog, which is why his music sounds rather slimy and a bit like trying to walk through quicksand. Perfydlia is a meddling old woman, who gossips about everybody and squeals with sudden delight at the small exciting bits of tittletattle about others in the village. In the music you can hear her sudden little squeals of delight. Maryann Lovely is a beautiful young lady, graceful, gorgeous, absolutely devine, and her music is obviously just the same. Thistledoo Nicely is a lively character who spends and spends and spends with her credit card, buying the latest fashion and never worries about having to pay the bills. Her music reflects her excitement when shopping and het 'happy go lucky' approach to life. Marsyn Edginton is the Lord of the manor, the richest man in town, the 'big cheese', the man with all the power and, of course, the biggest house. He is very grand and his music like he could be a king. Jimmy McScotsmyn is a red haired scotsman wearing tartan cap. He misses his home country terribly and eats lots of shortbread, oatcakes, scotch eggs, porridge and drinks an enormous amount of Scotch Wisky, which helps him to have fond memories of the kind of music he would like to dance to when he was a younger man. His favourite dance is a Jig and this is the music he remembers. Grand March of the Durkle Bandrydgators. We hope that you have enjoyed meeting these characters from Drukle Bandrydge and would invite you to listen to all the villagers now march along in a grand parade - it is a pity that you can not see them, what is a wonderful sight. If you listen carefully, you will hear the melodies which belong to the characters as they march past. Oh what a grand spectacle!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    March to the Scaffold - Hector Berlioz - Robert Childs

    The Symphonie Fantastique, the first of Berlioz's major works, was composed in 1830 when he was 26. 'March to the Scaffold', the fourth movement in this major work is music borrowed from Les Francs Juges, an abandoned opera started in 1826, originally titled 'March of the Guards'. The ending of the original was changed to accommodate the appearance of the id?e fixe. This tune itself was used in an earlier work, the cantata Herminie of 1828. March to the Scaffold depicts a young man in despair, having been shunned by the woman he loves. He poisons himself with opium. The narcotic, too weak to take his life, plunges the man into a long sleep. He has a series of vivid dreams and nightmares always involving images of his beloved. The hero dreams that he has killed her and has been sentenced to death. He sees himself being marched through the crowded streets amidst wild jeers from excited onlookers until he finally reaches the scaffold.Just before the guillotine descends to cut off his head, he imagines he sees his beloved in the crowd. Her tune is played by the soprano cornet and is the last thing seen or heard before the guillotine falls. He is killed, and the movement comes to a dramatic close.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    Lady of the Lake - Christopher Bond

    A remote Carmarthenshire lake shrouded in Welsh legend has been named as one of the 1,000 must-see sights across the globe by an influential travel bible. Llyn y Fan Fach, 12km southeast of Llandovery in the Brecon Beacons, is the only spot in Wales to make the list, which was put together by Lonely Planet. "This isolated drop of blue, beneath a cirque of raw Welsh hills, is enchanting - and enchanted," Lonely Planet's 1,000 Ultimate Sights tells readers.The st?ory goes that in the 13th Century, a farmer grazing cattle on the nearby slopes spotted the most beautiful woman he'd ever seen. She was a fairy maiden, who agreed to marry him on one proviso - he must not hit her more than twice. In time, the inevitable happened - three strikes, and the otherworldly wife disappeared back into the lake, taking her magic cows with her.This work, for flugel horn and brass band, is reflective in nature, portraying the dismay of the man in losing his wife for his own selfishness. The work was written for and premiered by Rob Nesbitt & City of Cardiff (Melingriffith) Band, at the 2019 Welsh Open Entertainment Contest in Porthcawl, Wales.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days