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  • £43.00

    Whence is that goodly Fragrance flowing? (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Whence is that Goodly Fragrance Flowing?' is the first line of an old French Christmas song that originated in the 17th century. In 1728 John Gay used this joyous and markedly festive melody that honours Jesus Christ and His miraculous birth in his Beggar's Opera. Philip Sparke has given this melody a new lease of life with his charming and imaginative arrangement for the Christmas season. 03:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £10.50

    Whence is that goodly Fragrance flowing? (Brass Band - Score only)

    Whence is that Goodly Fragrance Flowing?' is the first line of an old French Christmas song that originated in the 17th century. In 1728 John Gay used this joyous and markedly festive melody that honours Jesus Christ and His miraculous birth in his Beggar's Opera. Philip Sparke has given this melody a new lease of life with his charming and imaginative arrangement for the Christmas season. 03:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £30.00 £30.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    Los Canarios

    Originally written by "The Master of the Spanish Baroque Guitar" Gaspar Sanz in the late 17th century, David Powell’s brilliant updated arrangement regularly features on Superbrass programmes as an encore item. It’s got a really great catchy tune that completely permeates the brain cells. It also has an open middle section that allows for the drummer and/or perc section to let their hair down and go ape…. Guaranteed to get your audience’s feet tapping and hands clapping.Duration: 3 minutesPercussion: 3 players playing drum kit, tambourine and castanets.Grade 2: Moderately Easy 2nd and 3rd Section Bands

  • £60.00

    Danceries

    In Danceries , by Kenneth Hesketh, the melodies themselves are a mixture of old and new. Where the old occurs it has been adapted in mood and composition and is often interspersed with completely new material. The contemporary harmonies and rhythms bring a breath of new into these themes and add drama to the suite. The first movement, Lull Me Beyond Thee , is gentle and lilting, almost a barcarole, this movement is very much a reverie. The original tune had the name ‘Poor Robin’s Maggot’, a rather disconcerting title; maggot, however, in seventeenth-century parlance meant whim or fancy. The second, Catching of Quails , is a colourful, buoyant scherzo on an original melody. The thematic material is shuttled around the band to contrast with full-blooded tuttis. The last few bars fade to almost nothing, before a final surprise! My Lady’s Rest is a tender pavane, also on an original melody, with Moorish leanings. Beautiful solo passages, expressive contrapuntal writing and warm tuttis provide an opportunity to show off the most lyrical of playing. The final movement, Quodling’s Delight is a clever combination of the 17th century melody, 'Goddesses', with an original contrasting melody, creating a rousing and exuberant finale to the work. A sound clip of the last movement, Quodling's Delight , can be found here Item Code: 0-571-56512-3 Duration: c.15'40"

  • £70.00

    Danceries (Set II)

    Danceries Set II continues the format established with the previous Danceries (1999) by using tunes and dances from Playford’s 17th Century Dancing Master to form the basis of an extended dance suite. In this set, the melodies have become more abstracted and project only a distant echo of their original forms. As before, each movement is self-contained, colourful and direct, with its own distinct mood. The outer movements, Jennie’s Bawbee and Peascod’s Galliarda , share driving percussion with an almost military air. Tom Tinker’s Toye and Heart’s Ease , the second and third movements, are both settings of original melodies. All movements are more extended than in the first set, with a freer use and approach to the material, supported by a greater variety of harmonic colouring. The result is a richer, even more exhilarating set of dances.? Item Code: 0-571-57077-1 Duration: 15'00"

  • £46.00

    Montage (Score only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £56.00

    Montage (Parts only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £94.00

    Montage - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries.The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated.A chaconne follows – the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement’s structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne’s continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles.The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon.The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Revelation - Score and Parts - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Revelation - Score Only - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days