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    Euphonium Solo - In Christ Alone - Richard Phillips

    The popularity of this modern song is evidenced by the frequent use it enjoys during Sunday worship in many different denominational churches. The strength and solidity of the song is reflected in this triumphal arrangement, written at the request of Derick Kane and as a sequel to the earlier euphonium solo, 'There Will Be God'.

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    IN CHRIST ALONE - Townend/Getty - Hendrik de Boer

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    IN CHRIST ALONE - Parts & Score, NEW & RECENT Publications - Townend/Getty - Hendrik de Boer

    Duration: 4:15Difficulty: B/CThis publisher grades difficulty as follows:A = Very EasyB = EasyC = MediumD = DifficultE = Very Difficult

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    March - Spirit of the West - Dudley Bright

    Dudley Bright wrote this stirring march when he was the guest at The Salvation Army USA Western Territory Music Institute in 1981. Two tunes are featured, 'Dare to be a Daniel' and 'I'll stand for Christ, for Christ alone'.

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    ARBAN - The Authentic Edition for Trumpet/ Cornet - Book, Books - J.B Arban

    The ideal gift ! Arbans complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet/ Cornet OR ANY Treble Clef Brass Band Instrument. Contains : 1. Arban's Original Complete Method 2. The Art of Phrasing - 150 Songs & Operatic Airs 3. 68 Duets for two cornets ( or any two Bb. or two Eb.instruments). 4. 14 Characteristic Studies 5. Numerous fantasies and other solos JEAN BAPTISTE ARBAN : Joseph Jean Baptiste Laurent Arban was born at Lyons, France, February 28, 1825. He entered the Conservatory at an early age, taking up the study of the trumpet under Dauverné. and won first prize in 1845. His military term was spent in the navy on board the “La Belle Poule,” whose chief musician, Paulus, became Chief Musician of the Gardea Parisduring the reign of Napoleon Ill. After having been professor of saxhorn at the Military School (1857), Arban was elected professor of cornet at the Conservatory, January 23, 1869. Afterattending to these duties for a period of five years. he left the Conservatory for six years, returning again in 1880. He was the most brilliant cornet player of his time, and his astonishing performance and triumphant concert tours throughout Europe were the means of establishing the valve cornet as one of the most popular of all musical instruments. Arban’s artistic ideals, sound musicianship and invaluable instructive principles were perpetuated in his splendid Method for the Cornet, which has succeeded in maintaining the very highest position among similar instructive works and which has never been surpassed in point of practical superiority or artistic plan. Arban died at Paris on April 9, 1889. He was an officer of the Acaddmie, Knight of the Order of Leopold of Belgium, of Christ of Portugal. of Isabella the Catholic, and of the Cross of Russia. PREFACE to the 1982 Edition by Claude gordon : It is not only desirable but necessary for the student when. working with a method to study the text thoroughly. Only by understanding the meaning of the author’s statements and applying his teachings can a method be successful to the student. To help with this understanding, I have, with the aid of footnotes, attempted to clarify and augment the full sense of what Arban is saying in his text as it applies to modern instruments and today’s practices. In certain instances, where the explanations and teachings are obsolete or no longer applicable. I have deleted them from the text proper so as not to confuse today’s student. Arban’s book, however, is Arban’s and, in my opinion, should not be impulsively changed. Accordingly, deleted material has been placed below in the footnotes within brackets [ ] along with appropriate comments as called for. Further, in an attempt to maintain the book’s authenticity, the entire original French text along with a picture of a very early cornet of the type used by Arban appears at the back of the book. Perhaps more than any other person, Arban was responsible for successfully demonstrating the possibilities of the cornet. He wrote his method at a time when valve instruments were just beginning to be accepted and those instruments were far inferior to those which we have today. It is important then to remember when studying the original text that Arban discussed things in terms of the instrument known and available at the time. This is quickly apparent when we note his references to the tuning slide and the use of “crooks” which are obsolete today. The tuning slide that is used today to place the instrument at “common pitch” is still a slide at the end of the leader pipe on the trumpet or cornet. Some players today use a ring on the 3rd slide, some have one on the 1st slide, and some have one on both the 1st and third slides. These are used to put the low C# and low D in tune while playing; low C# on the better instruments is usually quite sharp while low D is just a little sharp. All this not withstanding, many positive developments have come about over the years with both the instrument and the players capabilities so that except for a few things that apply only to that era and the older horn, Arban’s method stands today as modern, as sound and as correct as it did over one hundred years ago. Indeed, this method along with another equally great method by Saint-Jacome serve as an absolutely necessary basis for anyone studying and playing trumpet or cornet. Today, the modern cornet has come to resemble the trumpet in external shape and tone quality and both instruments, are widely used in ensemble and solo work. Because of this amalgamation, Arban’s method is equally suitable to form the basis for either instrument. ??" Claude Gordon PREFACE to the 1894 and 1936 editions : It may appear somewhat strange to undertake the defense of the cornet at a time when this instrument has given proofs of its excellence, both in the orchestra and in solo performance. where it is no less indispensable to the composer, and no less liked by the public than the flute, the clarinet, and even the violin: where, in short, it has definitely won for itself the elevated position to which the beauty of its tone, the perfection of its mechanism and the immensity of its resources, so justly entitle it. But this was not always the case: the cornet was far less successful when it first appeared: and, indeed, not many years ago. the masses treated the instrument with supreme indifference. while that time-honored antagonist??"routine??" contested its qualities, and strove hard to prohibit their application. This phenomenon, however, is of never-failing recurrence at the birth of every new invention, however excellent it may be. and of this fact the appearance of the saxhorn and the saxophone, instruments of still more recent date than the cornet, gave a new and striking proof. The first musicians who plaved the cornet were, for the most part, either horn or trumpet players. Each imparted to his performance the peculiarities resulting from his tastes, his abilities and his habits. and I need scarcely add that the kind of performance which resulted from so many incomplete and heterogeneous elements was deficient in the extreme, and, for a long while, presented the lamentable spectacle of imperfections and failures of the most painful description. Gradually, however, matters assumed a more favourable aspect. Performers really worthy of the name of artists began to make their appearance. However, regardless of the brilliant accomplishments of such performers, they could not deny the faults of their original training, viz., the total lack of qualifications necessary for ensenible playing, and decided musicianly tendencies. Some excited admiration for their extreme agility: others were applauded for the expression with which they played: one was remarkable for lip; another for the high tone to which he ascended: others for the brilliancy and volume of their tone. In my opinion, it was the reign of specialists, but it does not appear that a single one of the players then in vogue ever thought of realizing or of obtaining the sum total of qualities which alone can constitute a great artist. This. then, is the point upon which I wish to insist, and to which I wish to call particular attention. At the present time, the incompleteness of the old school of performers is unanimously acknowledged. as is also the insuffiency of their instruction. That which is required is methodical execution and methodical instruction. It is not sufficient to phrase well or to execute difficult passages with skill. It is necessary that both these things should be equally well done. In a word, it is necessary that the cornet, as well as the flute, the clarinet, the violin, and the voice, should possess the pure style and the grand method of which a few professors, the Conservatory in particular, have conserved the precious secret and the salutary traditions. This is the aim which I have incessantly kept in view throughout my long career: and if a numerous series of brilliant successes obtained in the presence of the most competent judges and the most critical audiences.t give me the right to believe that I have, at any rate, approached the desired end. I shall not be laying myself open to the charge of presumption, in confidently entering upon the delicate mission of transmitting to others the results of my own thorough studies and assiduous practice. I have long been a professor, and this work is to a certain extent merely the resumé of a long experience which each day has brought nearer to perfection. My explanations will be found as short and clear as possible, for I wish to instruct and not to terrify the student. Long pages of “text” are not always read, and it is highly advantageous to replace the latter by exercises and examples. This is the wealth which I consider cannot be too lavishly accumulated; this is the source which can never be too plentifully drawn from. This. however, will be perceived from the extent of the present volume, in which, in my opinion, will be found the solution of all difficulties and of all problems. I have endeavored throughout to compose studies of a melodic nature, and in general to render the study of the instrument as agreeable as possible. In a word. I have endeavored to lead the pupil, without discouragement, to the highest limits of execution, sentiment and style, destined to characterize the new school. ??" J. P. ARBAN

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    ARBAN'S Platinum Edition with Piano accompaniment CD, Books - J.B. ARBAN

    The ideal gift ! Arbans complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet/ Cornet OR ANY Treble Clef Brass Band Instrument. Includes Piano accompaniment CD for Arban's Celebrated Celebrated Fantasies and Airs Varies. Please note that while the vast majority of this book is suitable for all treble clef brass instruments, the piano accompaniment will only work with Bb. pitch instruments. Contains : 1. Arban's Original Complete Method 2. The Art of Phrasing - 150 Songs & Operatic Airs 3. 68 Duets for two cornets ( or any two Bb. or two Eb.instruments). 4. 14 Characteristic Studies 5. Numerous fantasies and other solos Piano Accompaniment Tracks : No 1, Fantaisie and Variations on a Cavatina Track I Introduction-Andante Track 2 Theme Track 3 Variation 1 Track 4 Variation 2 Track 5 Variation 3 and Finale I Track 6 Finale II No. 3, Fantaisie Brillante Track 7 Introduction-Allegro maestoso Track 8 Interlude Track 9 Theme Track 10 Variation 1 Track It Variation 2 Track 12 Variation 3 No. 4, Variations on a Tyrolean Song Track 13 Introduction-Andante moderato Track 14 Theme-Andante Track 15 Variation I Track 16 Variation 2 Track 17 Variation 3 Track 18 Variation 4 Track 19 Rondo-Allegro No 5, Variations on a song The Beautiful Snow Track 20 Andante quasi Allegretto Track 21 Variation I Track 22 Variation 2 Track 23 Variation 3 Track 24 Finale-L.ento Track 25 Allegro No 6, Cavatina and Variations Track 26 Andante Track 27 Andante, continued Track 28 Theme-Moderato Track 29 Variation I Track 30 Variation 2 Track 31 Variation 3 No. 8, Caprice and Variations Track 32 Andantino Track 33 Andante moderato Track 34 Variation 1-Allegro moderato Track 35 Variation 2 Track 36 Variation 3-Piu lento No. 9, Fantaisie and Variations on a German Theme Track 37 Allegro moderato Track 38 Interlude Track 39 Theme-Andante Track 40 Variation I Track 41 Variation 2 Track 42 Variation 3 Track 43 Finale No. 10, Variations on a favorite theme by C. M. von Weber Track 44 Introduction-Allegro moderato Track 45 Interlude Track 46 Theme-Andantino Track 47 Variation 1 Track 48 Variation 2 Track 49 Variation 3 Track 50 Variation 4 No. 11, Fantaisie and Variations on The Carnival of Venice Track 51 Introduction-Allegretto Track 52 Interlude, Theme Track 53 Interlude, Variation I Track 54 Interlude, Variation 2 Track 55 Interlude, Variation 3-Andante Track 56 Interlude, Variation 4 No. 12, Variations on a theme from Norma Track 57 Andante maestoso Track 58 Interlude Track 59 Theme-moderato Track 60 Variation I Track 61 Variation 2 Track 62 Piu lento JEAN BAPTISTE ARBAN : Joseph Jean Baptiste Laurent Arban was born at Lyons, France, February 28, 1825. He entered the Conservatory at an early age, taking up the study of the trumpet under Dauverné. and won first prize in 1845. His military term was spent in the navy on board the “La Belle Poule,” whose chief musician, Paulus, became Chief Musician of the Gardea Parisduring the reign of Napoleon Ill. After having been professor of saxhorn at the Military School (1857), Arban was elected professor of cornet at the Conservatory, January 23, 1869. Afterattending to these duties for a period of five years. he left the Conservatory for six years, returning again in 1880. He was the most brilliant cornet player of his time, and his astonishing performance and triumphant concert tours throughout Europe were the means of establishing the valve cornet as one of the most popular of all musical instruments. Arban’s artistic ideals, sound musicianship and invaluable instructive principles were perpetuated in his splendid Method for the Cornet, which has succeeded in maintaining the very highest position among similar instructive works and which has never been surpassed in point of practical superiority or artistic plan. Arban died at Paris on April 9, 1889. He was an officer of the Acaddmie, Knight of the Order of Leopold of Belgium, of Christ of Portugal. of Isabella the Catholic, and of the Cross of Russia. PREFACE to the 1982 Edition by Claude gordon : It is not only desirable but necessary for the student when. working with a method to study the text thoroughly. Only by understanding the meaning of the author’s statements and applying his teachings can a method be successful to the student. To help with this understanding, I have, with the aid of footnotes, attempted to clarify and augment the full sense of what Arban is saying in his text as it applies to modern instruments and today’s practices. In certain instances, where the explanations and teachings are obsolete or no longer applicable. I have deleted them from the text proper so as not to confuse today’s student. Arban’s book, however, is Arban’s and, in my opinion, should not be impulsively changed. Accordingly, deleted material has been placed below in the footnotes within brackets [ ] along with appropriate comments as called for. Further, in an attempt to maintain the book’s authenticity, the entire original French text along with a picture of a very early cornet of the type used by Arban appears at the back of the book. Perhaps more than any other person, Arban was responsible for successfully demonstrating the possibilities of the cornet. He wrote his method at a time when valve instruments were just beginning to be accepted and those instruments were far inferior to those which we have today. It is important then to remember when studying the original text that Arban discussed things in terms of the instrument known and available at the time. This is quickly apparent when we note his references to the tuning slide and the use of “crooks” which are obsolete today. The tuning slide that is used today to place the instrument at “common pitch” is still a slide at the end of the leader pipe on the trumpet or cornet. Some players today use a ring on the 3rd slide, some have one on the 1st slide, and some have one on both the 1st and third slides. These are used to put the low C# and low D in tune while playing; low C# on the better instruments is usually quite sharp while low D is just a little sharp. All this not withstanding, many positive developments have come about over the years with both the instrument and the players capabilities so that except for a few things that apply only to that era and the older horn, Arban’s method stands today as modern, as sound and as correct as it did over one hundred years ago. Indeed, this method along with another equally great method by Saint-Jacome serve as an absolutely necessary basis for anyone studying and playing trumpet or cornet. Today, the modern cornet has come to resemble the trumpet in external shape and tone quality and both instruments, are widely used in ensemble and solo work. Because of this amalgamation, Arban’s method is equally suitable to form the basis for either instrument. ??" Claude Gordon PREFACE to the 1894 and 1936 editions : It may appear somewhat strange to undertake the defense of the cornet at a time when this instrument has given proofs of its excellence, both in the orchestra and in solo performance. where it is no less indispensable to the composer, and no less liked by the public than the flute, the clarinet, and even the violin: where, in short, it has definitely won for itself the elevated position to which the beauty of its tone, the perfection of its mechanism and the immensity of its resources, so justly entitle it. But this was not always the case: the cornet was far less successful when it first appeared: and, indeed, not many years ago. the masses treated the instrument with supreme indifference. while that time-honored antagonist??"routine??" contested its qualities, and strove hard to prohibit their application. This phenomenon, however, is of never-failing recurrence at the birth of every new invention, however excellent it may be. and of this fact the appearance of the saxhorn and the saxophone, instruments of still more recent date than the cornet, gave a new and striking proof. The first musicians who plaved the cornet were, for the most part, either horn or trumpet players. Each imparted to his performance the peculiarities resulting from his tastes, his abilities and his habits. and I need scarcely add that the kind of performance which resulted from so many incomplete and heterogeneous elements was deficient in the extreme, and, for a long while, presented the lamentable spectacle of imperfections and failures of the most painful description. Gradually, however, matters assumed a more favourable aspect. Performers really worthy of the name of artists began to make their appearance. However, regardless of the brilliant accomplishments of such performers, they could not deny the faults of their original training, viz., the total lack of qualifications necessary for ensenible playing, and decided musicianly tendencies. Some excited admiration for their extreme agility: others were applauded for the expression with which they played: one was remarkable for lip; another for the high tone to which he ascended: others for the brilliancy and volume of their tone. In my opinion, it was the reign of specialists, but it does not appear that a single one of the players then in vogue ever thought of realizing or of obtaining the sum total of qualities which alone can constitute a great artist. This. then, is the point upon which I wish to insist, and to which I wish to call particular attention. At the present time, the incompleteness of the old school of performers is unanimously acknowledged. as is also the insuffiency of their instruction. That which is required is methodical execution and methodical instruction. It is not sufficient to phrase well or to execute difficult passages with skill. It is necessary that both these things should be equally well done. In a word, it is necessary that the cornet, as well as the flute, the clarinet, the violin, and the voice, should possess the pure style and the grand method of which a few professors, the Conservatory in particular, have conserved the precious secret and the salutary traditions. This is the aim which I have incessantly kept in view throughout my long career: and if a numerous series of brilliant successes obtained in the presence of the most competent judges and the most critical audiences.t give me the right to believe that I have, at any rate, approached the desired end. I shall not be laying myself open to the charge of presumption, in confidently entering upon the delicate mission of transmitting to others the results of my own thorough studies and assiduous practice. I have long been a professor, and this work is to a certain extent merely the resumé of a long experience which each day has brought nearer to perfection. My explanations will be found as short and clear as possible, for I wish to instruct and not to terrify the student. Long pages of “text” are not always read, and it is highly advantageous to replace the latter by exercises and examples. This is the wealth which I consider cannot be too lavishly accumulated; this is the source which can never be too plentifully drawn from. This. however, will be perceived from the extent of the present volume, in which, in my opinion, will be found the solution of all difficulties and of all problems. I have endeavored throughout to compose studies of a melodic nature, and in general to render the study of the instrument as agreeable as possible. In a word. I have endeavored to lead the pupil, without discouragement, to the highest limits of execution, sentiment and style, destined to characterize the new school. ??" J. P. ARBAN