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  • £19.50

    Codebreakers - Len Jenkins

    A great march, dedicated to the memory of those who worked at Bletchley Park, Milton Keynes, England, in World War 2. They were under the brilliant leadership of Alan Turing and were responsible for breaking the secret military codes used by the Enemy Forces (German in particular). The composer, Len Jenkins, lives close to Bletchley Park, went to school even closer, and attended Training Courses actually in 'The Park'. The march has memorable themes and is toe tapping for the audience.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £19.50

    Hut Six - Len Jenkins

    A great march (perfect for contests such as whit Fridays) dedicated to the memory of those who worked at Bletchley Park, Milton Keynes, England, in World War 2. They were under the brilliant leadership of Alan Turing and were responsible for breaking the secret military codes used by the Enemy Forces (German in particular). The composer, Len Jenkins, lives close to Bletchley Park, went to school even closer, and attended Training Courses actually in 'The Park'. The march has memorable themes and is toe tapping for the audience.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £44.60

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war.Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert.On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good.If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008

  • £33.95

    SHINING SWORD (Brass Band) - Wiffin, Rob

    This extended fanfare was written for the Royal Air Force Bomber Command Commemorations, 2012. The prototype Avro Lancaster bomber was launched into the skies in 1941 and proved to be a significant factor in winning the Second World War. Its slender silvery outline led it to be known as the Shining Sword. Duration: 2:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £69.95

    Revelation - Score and Parts - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Revelation - Score Only - Philip Wilby

    Symphony for Double Brass on a theme of Purcell 1995 marked the tercentenary of Purcell’s death, and my new score Revelation has been written as a tribute to his music and the ornate and confident spirit of his age. There are five major sections: 1 Prologue 2 Variations on a ground bass I 3 Fugue 4 Variations on a ground bass II 5 Epilogue and Resurrection The score uses many features of the Baroque Concerto Grosso, and arranges players in two equal groups from which soloists emerge to play in a variety ofvirtuoso ensembles. It quotes freely from Purcell’s own piece Three Parts on a Ground in which he has composed a brilliant sequence of variations over a repeating six-note bass figure. This original motif can be heard most clearly beneath the duet for Cornet 5 and Soprano at the beginning of the 2nd section. There is, of course, a religious dimension to Revelation as the title suggests, and the score is prefaced by lines by the 17th century poet John Donne. His Holy Sonnet paraphrases the Book of Revelation in which the dead are raised at the sounds of the last trumpet. Donne’s trumpets are themselves placed stereophonically “. . . At the round Earth’s imagined corners” and it is this feature that today’s players represent as they move around the performing area. Their final apocalyptic fanfares can be heard at the close of the score, as Purcell’s music re-enters in a lasting tribute to England’s first composer of genius. Philip Wilby September 1995 At the round Earth imagined corners, blow your trumpets, angels, and arise, arise from death, you numberless infinities Of souls, and to your scattered bodies go. All whom the flood did, and fire shall o ‘erthrow All whom war, dearth, age, agues, tyrannies, Despair, law, chance hath slain, and you whose eyes Shall Behold God, and never taste death woe. John Donne after Revelation Ch. 11 v.15

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days