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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £50.00

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear". To view a sample PDF score click here.

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  • £48.00

    Tell me its not true

    Blood Brothers is a musical with book, lyrics, and music by Willy Russell. The story is a contemporary nature versus nurture plot, revolving around fraternal twins Mickey and Eddie, who were separated at birth and one raised in a wealthy family while the other raised in a poor family. The twins' different backgrounds take them to opposite ends of the social spectrum, one becoming a councillor and the other unemployed and in prison. They both fall in love with the same girl, causing a tear in their friendship and leading to the tragic death of both brothers. The iconic anthem from Willy Russell's world wide musical theatre hit "Blood Brothers". Arranged by Adam DJ Taylor this arrangement is with the kind permission of Willy Russell. Willy made the following comment on this arrangement "Please pass on my warmest congratulations to Adam I think he has done a superb job with this arrangement"

  • £41.00

    David of the White Rock - Philip Sparke

    This is an ancient Welsh air that was first published in Relics of the Welsh Bards in 1794. Dafydd (David) Owain was a famous Welsh bard who lived on a farm called Gareg Wen (The White Rock) in Eifionydd, Carnarnvonshire, North Wales. Tradition has it that on his deathbed he called for his harp and composed this lovely melody, requesting that it be played at his funeral. Accordingly, it was later played at the parish church of Ynys-Cynhaiarn. Lyrics were later added by Ceiriog Hughes, which describe the melody's inspiration. This version for brass band retains all the beauty and simplicity of the original.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £39.00

    David of the White Rock (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    This is an ancient Welsh air that was first published in Relics of the Welsh Bards in 1794. Dafydd (David) Owain was a famous Welsh bard who lived on a farm called Gareg Wen (The White Rock) in Eifionydd, Carnarnvonshire, North Wales. Tradition has it that on his deathbed he called for his harp and composed this lovely melody, requesting that it be played at his funeral. Accordingly, it was later played at the parish church of Ynys-Cynhaiarn. Lyrics were later added by Ceiriog Hughes, which describe the melody's inspiration. This version for brass band retains all the beauty and simplicity of the original. 02:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £7.95

    David of the White Rock (Brass Band - Score only)

    This is an ancient Welsh air that was first published in Relics of the Welsh Bards in 1794. Dafydd (David) Owain was a famous Welsh bard who lived on a farm called Gareg Wen (The White Rock) in Eifionydd, Carnarnvonshire, North Wales. Tradition has it that on his deathbed he called for his harp and composed this lovely melody, requesting that it be played at his funeral. Accordingly, it was later played at the parish church of Ynys-Cynhaiarn. Lyrics were later added by Ceiriog Hughes, which describe the melody's inspiration. This version for brass band retains all the beauty and simplicity of the original. 02:45

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Elizabethan Serenade - Ronald Binge - Len Jenkins

    Elizabethan Serenade was composed in 1951 by Ronald (Ronnie) Binge. When Walter Eastman at publishers Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew (who had given Ronnie much encouragement following his return to the music industry after the war) heard the piece he said it sounded like an Elizabethan serenade and with the accession of Queen Elizabeth II in February 1952 and the advent of a second 'Elizabethan age' the piece was re-titled to that with which we are now familiar. The tune was used as the theme for the popular 1950s radio series Music Tapestry, Music in Miniature on the BBC and as the play-out for the British Forces Network radio station. It won an Ivor Novello award in 1957 and had chart successes in Germany and South Africa. Lyrics by poet Christopher Hassall were added later, along with those in German, Czech, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, Danish and French. There was even a reggae version. In 2012, the year of the Queen's Jubilee, one website put it: "The song of the day?is Ronald Binge's Elizabethan Serenade" and, accordingly, it was played at the official Jubilee concert and The Last Night of the Proms.