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  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £129.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £69.95

    STARMAKER (Brass Band Set) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    Described by the composer as one of his more ambitious works for brass band, this work is in three movements. Although each movement is capable of standing alone, the composer's own concept is totality with the three movements forming a composite whole. Starmaker presents in music the concept of God's creation of the universe. The frantic and sometimes harsh music of the first movement portrays the chaos from which the immortal and invisible wisdom of God created the order and structure of the heavens, with the stars and planets in their ordered places. An exquisite second movement, based on the benediction 'Now the day is over', brings a calm and ordered peace to the universe, also reminding listeners of the night sky, when God's amazing work is best viewed in all its awesome wonder. The final movement is celebratory in nature, with fragments of melodies like 'Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation' appearing in various guises.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Starmaker (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Steadman-Allen, Ray

    Described by the composer as one of his more ambitious works for brass band, this work is in three movements. Although each movement is capable of standing alone, the composer's own concept is totality with the three movements forming a composite whole. Starmaker presents in music the concept of God's creation of the universe. The frantic and sometimes harsh music of the first movement portrays the chaos from which the immortal and invisible wisdom of God created the order and structure of the heavens, with the stars and planets in their ordered places. An exquisite second movement, based on the benediction 'Now the day is over', brings a calm and ordered peace to the universe, also reminding listeners of the night sky, when God's amazing work is best viewed in all its awesome wonder. The final movement is celebratory in nature, with fragments of melodies like 'Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation' appearing in various guises.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Starmaker (Brass Band - Score only) - Steadman-Allen, Ray

    Described by the composer as one of his more ambitious works for brass band, this work is in three movements. Although each movement is capable of standing alone, the composer's own concept is totality with the three movements forming a composite whole. Starmaker presents in music the concept of God's creation of the universe. The frantic and sometimes harsh music of the first movement portrays the chaos from which the immortal and invisible wisdom of God created the order and structure of the heavens, with the stars and planets in their ordered places. An exquisite second movement, based on the benediction 'Now the day is over', brings a calm and ordered peace to the universe, also reminding listeners of the night sky, when God's amazing work is best viewed in all its awesome wonder. The final movement is celebratory in nature, with fragments of melodies like 'Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation' appearing in various guises.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Aristotle's Air - Christopher Bond

    The Ancient Greeks believed that there were four elements that everything was made up of: earth, water, air and fire. This theory was suggested around 450 BC, and was later supported and added to by Aristotle. The idea that these four elements – earth, water, air and fire – made up all matter was the cornerstone of philosophy, science, and medicine for two thousand years.Air was considered a pure element, but in fact the air that’s all around us is made up of a variety of gasses. Of course, in music, air has a different meaning; a beautiful song-like melody or tune and Aristotle’s Air is just that.The work was commissioned by and written for The Cory Band as part of their winning 2015 Brass in Concert programme The Four Elements of the Universe, being premiered at the contest at The Sage, Gateshead, on 15th November 2015. The work was awarded the Cyril Beere Memorial Trophy for the Best New Composition or Arrangement.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £89.99

    Galactic Odyssey - Bartlett, Darren

    GALACTICODYSSEY-A Constellation Suite - Journey to the Stars 1) AQUILA - THE EAGLE(magnifico) In Greek mythology Eagles were used to represent an ascension up to the heavens. The opening stanza depicts the wonder of such miraculous acts. A sense of grandeur and of the magnificence of the universe should shine through.2) DRACO - THE DRAGON(con fuoco) The "Celestial pole" or "Seat of Judgement" was guarded by the celestial serpent, the constellation Draco. As the marking indicates, this section should be played "with fire" and exuberance. 3) CYGNUS - THE SWAN(cantabile con calore) Swans are known for their swan-song, it was believed that these birds of regal grace sang only once in their lifetime, just before they die. "To be swan-like" is to greet death with a song of exceptional beauty and calm acceptance. This should be played in a spirit of contemplation with pathos and warmth. 4) DELPHINUS- THE DOLPHIN(capriccio) Dolphins are well-known for their agility and their capricious behaviour; many species will leap out of the water to view their surroundings. This 2nd Century by the astronomer Ptolemy. In this section the marimba emulates the sound of water along with the rain-stick; the rhythm of the raindrops must come through. This is followed by a more melancholic melody which should be played sweetly but sorrowfully; the impact of the elements leading to inward reflection. 6) ORION - THE HUNTER(minaccioso) The scoring here aims to suggest menace and conjures up the threat of the hunt. Bar 10 should be played with edge from the Trombones as the Hunter seeks out his victim. The 'rips' from the Tenor Horns & Euphoniums should emulate the French Horn. Bar 28 sees the commencement of the chase as the Hunter moves on his prey. At Bar 34 the percussion indicates danger is imminent: a sense of threat should cut through with the driving rhythm, a la bolero. This will be reinforced by a strict adherence to the beat, representing the remorseless persistence of the Hunter and the seeming impossibility of the prey's escape. As we move towards the climax of the music, Bar 49 begins with a series of semiquavers depicting stars appearing in the sky. This segues to a frenzied finale, the capture of the exhausted prey and the Hunter's victorious conclusion. should be performed with a sense of breathless joy with playfulness & humour as its key characteristics, as depicted by the tin whistle and timpani glissandos. 5) AQUARIUS - THE WATER CARRIER( tranquillo) Latin for "water carrier", Aquarius is one of the first-recognised constellations and was recorded in the 2nd Century by the astronomer Ptolemy. In this section the marimba emulates the sound of water along with the rain-stick; the rhythm of the raindrops must come through. This is followed by a more melancholic melody which should be played sweetly but sorrowfully; the impact of the elements leading to inward reflection. 6) ORION - THE HUNTER (minaccioso) The scoring here aims to suggest menace and conjures up the threat of the hunt. Bar 10 should be played with edge from the Trombones as the Hunter seeks out his victim. The 'rips' from the Tenor Horns & Euphoniums should emulate the French Horn. Bar 28 sees the commencement of the chase as the Hunter moves on his prey. At Bar 34 the percussion indicates danger is imminent: a sense of threat should cut through with the driving rhythm, a la bolero. This will be reinforced by a strict adherence to the beat, representing the remorseless persistence of the Hunter and the seeming impossibility of the prey's escape. As we move towards the climax of the music, Bar 49 begins with a series of semiquavers depicting stars appearing in the sky. This segues to a frenzied finale, the capture of the exhausted prey and the Hunter's victorious conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Aristotle's Air - Christopher Bond

    Written for & Commissioned by Cory Band for Brass in Concert 2015, Winner of Best New Composition/Arrangement at Brass in Concert 2015The Ancient Greeks believed that there were four elements that everything was made up of: earth, water, air and fire. This theory was suggested around 450 BC, and was later supported and added to by Aristotle. The idea that these four elements - earth, water, air and fire - made up all matter was the cornerstone of philosophy, science, and medicine for two thousand years. Air was considered a 'pure' element, but in fact the air that's all around us is made up of a variety of gasses. Of course, in music, air has a different meaning; a beautiful song-like melody or tune and Aristotle's Air is just that. The work was commissioned by and written for The Cory Band as part of their winning 2015 Brass in Concert programme 'TheFour Elements of the Universe', being premiered at the contest at The Sage, Gateshead, on 15th November 2015. The work was awarded the Cyril Beere Memorial Trophy for the Best New Composition or Arrangement.

  • £94.00

    Fire - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich

    Fire - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich - 08'30'' - BVT113 Fire is one of the four great elements; earth, water, wind and fire, which create the universe in buddhistic aspect. Fire creates living beings, fire gives world warmth and fire can be the symbol of romance. However, fire can also destroy the world when human uses it out of their angriness, hatred and jealousy. This piece begins with the creation of the world and living beings. The slow movement in the middle of the piece defines fire as the symbol of warmth and romance. After the warm moment of fire has gone, the theme of war begins. It is caused by the misuse of fire from human which brings the world and humanity to the end. The strong ending of this piece represents the end of world and humanity.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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