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  • £30.00

    TOCCATA (from Symphony No.8) (Brass Band) - Vaughan Williams, Ralph - Littlemore, Phillip

    Ralph Vaughan Williams' Symphony in D minor (his eighth) was composed in 1956, when he was in his 84th year. It is noticeably different from its predecessors in its diminutive scale and comparatively short length. However, the symphony is scored for an unusually large percussion ensemble including vibraphone, xylophone, tubular bells, glockenspiel, tuned gongs and celeste. In the Toccata, the fourth and final movement, Vaughan Williams uses the enlarged percussion forces extensively - the eight symphony is therefore in some ways a highly imaginative work, perhaps even an experimental one.. This brass band transcription tries to remain as true to the original percussion writing as possible, but with the omission of the tuned gongs and celeste??"for obvious practical performance reasons. Duration: 5:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £27.00

    Auld Lang Syne

    It is a tradition in most English-speaking countries to sing this song at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve to usher in the New Year. The words are at least partially written by Robert Burns and the words "Auld Lang Syne" literally mean "old long ago" or "the good old days", providing a moment of reflection before moving forwards into the New Year.The tubular bells, although pitched, sound midnight when they enter at bar 10.This arrangement was prepared for Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Keith M Wilkinson, to perform at First Night, Akron, Ohio, December 31st, 2007. The following choreography is suggested:Commence the performance with all the cornets scattered around the auditorium.At the end of bar 18 invite the audience to sing along with the band.At bar 27 the cornets move to stand in front of the other members of the band to lead to the stirring conclusion. Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne?For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne,We'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £75.00

    Dances and Arias - Edward Gregson

    This work was commissioned by Boosey & Hawkes Band Festivals (with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain) for the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on 7th October 1984.Dances and Arias is in one continuous movement, but as the title suggests is a series of alternating fast and slow sections as follows: Dance – Aria I – Dance (scherzo) – Aria II – Dance. The opening dance is energetic and introduces a four-note motif (on trombones) which is the basis for much of the melodic material in the work. Throughout, there is a continuous process of thematic cross-reference and transformation.The first aria unfolds a long melody on solo cornet, eventually continued by all the solo cornets, and dissolving into a shimmering harmonic background (muted cornets, horns and baritones) over which is heard a brief self-quotation on solo tuba. This leads into the second dance, a frenetic scherzo, followed by the second aria, in the style of a lament (solo euphonium, followed by two flugel horns). This builds to a powerful climax which subsides, leaving the percussion to introduce the final toccata-like dance. It transforms material from the opening before a coda brings the music to a triumphant close. The large percussion section is an integral part in the work and uses a wide variety of instruments including timpani, glockenspiel, vibraphone, xylophone, tubular bells, tom-toms, snare drum, bongos and tam-tam.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99 £34.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Silhouette | Flugelhorn Solo | Kevin Bell

    This flugelhorn feature for Brass Band highlights the warm and gentle qualities of the instrument.The melody is lyrical, but not too demanding and focuses on tone and feel - using a repeating motif as its theme with an almost fanfare, ascending opening melody line.Silhouette has a short introduction with muted cornets which sets up the back drop for the solo to play over. The background accompaniment changes as the melody continues, creating a kind of musical silhouette for the soloist to play over.The piece develops as the band takes over with layered themes, eventually returning to the soloist who brings the piece to a gentle close. An ideal solo item and concert filler.InstrumentationSoprano, Solo, Repiano, 2nd and 3rd CornetsFlugelhornSolo, 1st and 2nd Tenor Horns1st and 2nd Baritone1st, 2nd and Bass TromboneEuphoniumEb and Bb BassesPercussion parts (4):1: Timpani2: Drum kit3: Vibraphone, Glockenspiel4: Tubular Bells, TriangleISMN: 979-0-708127-06-2

  • £49.95

    1812 Overture - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

    The 1812 Overture for Orchestra, Opus 49 is without doubt one of the most popular finales used by orchestras throughout the world. Here we have a new arrangement for brass band skilfully crafted by Dr. Robert Childs. The arrangement is shorter in duration than Tchaikovsky's original, but does not fluctuate from his key structure, making this version the most authentic to date. The arrangement features full orchestral percussion including tubular bells and canon together with optional organ and fanfare brass groups.Dr Childs's arrangement is featured by the Black Dyke Band on their CD Essential Dyke Vol V - Celebrate Rotary (DOYCD193).

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £30.00

    Toccata - Phillip Littlemore

    Ralph Vaughan Williams’ Symphony in D minor (his eighth) was composed in 1956, when he was in his 84th year. It is noticeably different from its predecessors in its diminutive scale and comparatively short length. However, the symphony is scored for an unusually large percussion ensemble including vibraphone, xylophone, tubular bells, glockenspiel, tuned gongs and celeste. In the Toccata, the fourth and final movement, Vaughan Williams uses the enlarged percussion forces extensively - the eight symphony is therefore in some ways a highly imaginative work, perhaps even an experimental one. Despite his advanced years, Vaughan Williams was still continuing to experiment with innovative orchestration and interesting instrument choices. By the time he came to write this symphony, he had already composed concertos for harmonica and tuba, which were quite unusual for the time. This brass band transcription tries to remain as true to the original percussion writing as possible, but with the omission of the tuned gongs and celeste—for obvious practical performance reasons. This arrangement has been recorded by the Leyland Band, conducted by Thomas Wyss, and appears on the CD Crown Imperial . A soundclip is available here Item Code: TPBB-038 Duration: 5'00"?