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  • £57.50

    Three Times a Tune - Jan Hadermann

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £57.50

    Three Times a Tune (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Hadermann, Jan

    Duration: 8.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £35.00

    Magic Flute Overture, The (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus - Littlemore, Phillip

    Mozart's The Magic Flute is a two-act opera composed in 1791, the year of his death. It was the culmination of a period of increasing involvement by Mozart with Emmanuel Schikaneder's theatrical troupe, which since 1789 had been the resident company at the Theater auf der Wieden. The Magic Flute is noted for its prominent Masonic elements; both Schikaneder and Mozart were believed to be Masons and also lodge brothers. Much of Mozart's Masonic music is written in the key of E flat. This key, with 3 flats is indicative of Masonic symbolism. There are other examples of the number three in the opera as well. The opening chords of the introduction sound three times, which also happens during the Temple scenes. Also represented in threes are the three temples of Wisdom, Reason and Nature. Tamino tries to open the three doors of the temple. There are three ladies, the attendants to the Queen of the Night, and three boys who serve as guides to Tamino and Papageno. Duration: 6:30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £10.00

    Perseverance

    DescriptionPerseverance was commissioned by Middleton Band to mark their 140th anniversary in 2016, supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, and featured on Middleton Band's CD of the same name.The title is taken from the original name of the 1876 band, the Middleton Perseverance Drum and Fife Band. According to the band's historical records, the Drum and Fife band was formed by six Middleton youngsters eager to learn music but short of funds. Following a whip round, they visited a music shop in Oldham where they purchased a 'one key flute' for six shillings and sixpence, and ('later on') a drum.This determination to make music despite the odds has been a characteristic of the band ever since; at the end of the second world war the band was again down to six players, who rebuilt the 'Middleton Borough Band' back to twenty-six players. After a period of some considerable success throughout the sixties and seventies culminating in winning the National Third Section title in 1983 the band hit hard times again in the late eighties and was down to only four members in 1987 before again being brought back to life. In recent decades the band has built a strong relationship with the East Lancashire Railway, another organisation which has battled sometimes mighty obstacles in its struggle to survive, and has maintained a thriving and successful youth band.The band's will to survive through adversity is reflected in the music, which builds from a sextet of four brass and two percussion players three times, only to fall back to the sextet twice. In the central slow movement the bass drum plays a 'heartbeat' rhythm as the remaining players remember those lost in the war. The relentless pace of the final section culminates in the band triumphing over the adversity which has curtailed the previous two sections. As a former member of Middleton Band (and one of the team that regained the National Third Section title in 2007) it is my pleasure to dedicate this work to the 'Pop and Ale Boys', Middleton Band.You can read more about the piece here.To view the accompanying video by Andy Marshall, designed to precede the piece, clickhereand find out more about the link between the video and the music here.Recording with Score VideoPerformance NotesIn performance the four brass members of the sextet (soprano, solo horn, solo trombone and solo euphonium) should stand at the sides of the band - soprano and horn behind the cornets, trombone and euphonium behind the trombones. Percussion may stand with them at the conductor's discretion, but only if the band has TWO snare drums and TWO concert bass drums available, as these are also needed at the back of the band in the tutti sections. In the second sextet snare drum should be muffled with a heavy cloth OR have the snares turned off (not both).Percussion and mutesPercussion required:snare drum (muffled with a heavy cloth at one point)concert bass drum, kit bass drum, hi-hat, suspended (crash) cymbal2 x tom-tomswood blockclash cymbals3 x timpanitam-tamglockenspielSoprano cornet, repiano and 2nd cornets, flugel and all trombones require metal straight mutes. Soprano, Solo Cornet 3/4, Repiano 2nd and 3rd cornets require cup mutes. Solo Cornet 1/2, Repiano, 2nd and 3rd cornets require harmon mutes.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £55.46

    A Renaissance Christmas (Brass Band) Kevin Norbury

    VIEW SCORE PDF This magnificent festive suite was written by Kevin Norbury for the Pierre Elliott Trudeau High School Wind Symphony and features several well known carols set in a Renaissance style. Here it has been set for brass band. Three contrasting movements comprise the work: i. Processional (Personent hodie - On this day earth shall ring) This is a short piece imagining a torchlight Yuletide procession (perhaps bearing the traditional roasted wild boar), using a well-known Christmas melody from the large collection of music compiled in the 16th century called Piae Cantiones (1582). The tune is presented twice with accompanying, related melodic material. ii. Pastorale (Quem pastores laudavere - Shepherds sang their praises o'er him) This is a 14th-century melody which was originally collected by Michael Praetorius at the end of the 16th-century. The treatment throughout is very lyrical without overly complex harmonies. The melody is heard three times with brief linking episodes and a short coda. iii. Celebration! (In dulci jubilo - In sweet celebration - Ding-dong merrily on high)) This magnificent 13th-century melody was also a part of Michael Praetorius's collection. It is traditional associated with the words 'Good Christian men, rejoice!' The opening is a straight transcription of the great chorale prelude for organ by J.S.Bach. After the grandeur of the opening, the tune is heard in more of a 'folky' style. A lot of related melodic material is then presented before the tune Ding-dong merrily on high is heard. After another episode of previously used music In dulci jubilo reappears in a joyful conclusion to the piece. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 3rd Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb Repiano Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb 3rd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Percussion 1-4

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £35.00

    Ascension - Lucy Pankhurst

    A major work written for the RNCM Brass Festival Competition 2005, and inspired by the nature of Ascension - creating a Musical depiction of the spiritual journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As aninitial muse for this work, the 'Tibetan Singing Bowl' is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity, together withBaoding Balls(Chinese Health Balls) to mark the point of Final Ascension.Programme notes from the composer, Lucy Pankhurst:Ascension is a Musical depiction of the Spiritual Journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As my initial muse for this work, the Singing Bowl is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity. "Tibetan" Singing Bowls date back to the 8th Century A.D., originating in the pre-Buddhist shamanic Bon Po culture in the Himalayas and are still used in modern Monasteries. The original purpose of them still remains a mystery, with accounts stating that it is forbidden to disclose the true function of the Bowls, as the "secrets of sound" yield so much Power, that they must be kept hidden.Listening to the tones created by the Singing Bowl effectively silences the internal dialogue of the listener, making it an excellent tool for Meditation, Centering and entering trance-like states. In Buddhism, as with many cultures, sound is an important part of Spiritual Practice. There are 9 methods to reach Enlightenment in the Buddhist Doctrine ; the seventh is SOUND.These Bowls are used by Healers in a similar way to help balance the body's residual energies. The Bowls are usually made from seven different sacred metals, intended to correlate directly to the seven sacred "Planets" : GOLD (Sun), SILVER (Moon), MERCURY (Mercury), COPPER (Venus), IRON (Mars), TIN (Jupiter), ANTIMONY (Saturn). Any one Bowl can create up to seven different frequencies (tones) simultaneously. In Healing, the Singing Bowl is played whilst balanced on the palm of the hand, struck three times to stabilise the surrounding energies, before rotating the wooden "beater" around the outer circumference of the Bowl to create the "singing" effect.I have included an optional Vibraphone part (to be played with a Double Bass Bow) with Tubular Bells, to be used only in performances where a Singing Bowl cannot be acquired. However, a traditional Bowl should be used whenever possible, to create this specific and unique sound.Baoding Balls or Chinese Health Balls are also utilised in this work. Their appearance in the Music here, however, is to mark the point of Final Ascension, where the music reaches its ultimate goal. These delicate cloisonne iron Balls are said to stimulate the acupressure points on the hand, thus improving the Chi and Energy Paths (Life Force) throughout the entire body. The delicate "tinkle" produced by these spheres is hypnotic and captivating. For this reason, where no Baoding Balls are obtainable for performance, only delicate metallic percussion should be used in replacement (i.e. Crotales, Antique Cymbals or (liberal) single strikes on a Triangle etc.). Bell Trees, Wind Chimes and Cow Bells should not be used.As in many cultures, the number three is important in Ascension, as it represents not only the purification from the Singing Bowl, but also it is a number of confirmation, reiterated throughout the music in the metallic percussion in addition to the Brass, re-affirming the correct path to Enlightenment.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £33.00

    When a Knight Won His Spurs - Traditional - Thomas, B

    Many people of a certain age will be familiar with When a Knight won his Spurs. A God-fearing Knight battling fearsome dragons and ogres really sticks in the memory, along with the fabulous folk tune.Prefaced by a mysterious opening derived from the melody itself, the tune appears a further three times, linked by a glittering fanfare. The folk feel of the original tune has been retained, and the piece drives along using a dual 3/4 - 6/8 time signature. The first statement of the tune is a conventional harmonisation; the second statement uses more colourful harmonies, and the triumphal final statement follows a dramatic upward key change. Three minutes in length makes it an ideal opener.2nd section +

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £35.65

    Verleih Uns Frieden (Brass Band) Mendelssohn arr. Edward Mylechreest

    Felix Mendelssohn's stunning Choral Cantata has here been adapted to the brass band by Edward Mylechreest. A setting of Martin Luther's sacred words, this short piece is a staple of the choral canon and is widely regarded as a choral masterpiece. The hymn tune melody repeats three times throughout the piece (first from the trombones, then the horns, followed by a full band chorale), each time an emploring prayer and statement of the text. This arrangement can also be used for accompaniment to the original Chorale, remaining in the original Eb major key signature. Knowledge of the original piece will be of great benefit to the performer and conductor alike. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 4th Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb 1st Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Percussion Tacet

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £25.00

    Pomp and Circumstance March No.1 (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Elgar, Edward - Littlemore, Phillip

    Elgar's Pomp & Circumstance March No. 1was completed in July 1901 although the 'big tune' actually dates from earlier in that same year. It was premiered in Liverpool by its dedicatees, the Liverpool Orchestral Society, on the 19th October. It was repeated in London a few days later by Henry Wood at the Promenade concerts and the result was sensational, the audience roared its applause, and refused to allow the concert to continue. In order to restore order, Wood conducted the march three times - the only time in the history of the Promenade concerts that an orchestral item was accorded a double encore in Wood's lifetime. Duration: 6:40

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £82.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that 'the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man'. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy's tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett's march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days