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  • £24.95

    The Lamb - Trombone Solo - Michael Kenyon

    Many composers have set William Blake's beautiful and timeless poem 'The Lamb' to music. Michael Kenyon's setting has long been a Salvation Army favourite. This arrangement is by the Music Editor and Technician for the USA Eastern Territory, Dorothy Gates.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £32.00

    Ye Banks and Braes (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    The origins of this melody are unknown but, set to the poem by Robert Burns, this has become one of the most popular Scottish songs.This arrangement was prepared at the request of Brett Baker for one of his many visits to perform as a soloist with Brass Band of the Western Reserve and its musical director Keith M Wilkinson. It has been recorded by Brett with BBWR on the CD Slides Rule!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £49.99 £49.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    The Sorcerer's Apprentice | Dukas arr. Alwyn Green

    Most of us are familiar with the symphonic poem written by 19th century composer, Paul Dukas, which was inspired by an 18th century poem by Goethe in which the sorcerer’s apprentice, desiring to save himself some work attempts to try his hand at his masters craft when things go terribly wrong!This version, arranged by Alwyn Green for Brass Band, captures the spirit of the original masterpiece in a complex and challenging score for Brass Band. It has all the drama, and vibrant energy of the Dukas masterpiece, brilliantly orchestrated for Brass Band.Listen to the piece played by Foresters Brass 2000, from their CD : ‘Heritage’ which can be obtained from the band.Instrumentation: Soprano, Solo, Repiano, 2nd and 3rd CornetsFlugelhornSolo, 1st and 2nd Tenor Horns1st and 2nd Baritone1st, 2nd and Bass TromboneEuphoniumEb and Bb BassesPercussion parts (4):1: Timpani2: Cymbal3: Glockenspiel4: VibraphoneISMN: 979-0-708127-01-7

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  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £38.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Score only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £48.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Parts only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £64.95

    Dick Turpins Ride To York - Rodney Newton

    Commissioned in 1998 by trombone superstar Brett Baker, Dick Turpin's Ride to York, was originally scored for trombone and brass band.Inspiration for the work is taken from Alfred Noyes poem The Ballad of Dick Turpin, which describes a fictional attempt by notorious highwayman, Dick Turpin, to ride from London to York to escape justice and the inevitable hangman's noose.The work is rich and dark in colour but paints a clear musical representation of its subject. Galloping horses, post horns and racing stage coaches all make an appearance in this wonderful solo and the listener has their work cut out trying to keep up with the highwayman as he is chased through the storm ridden night.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £49.99 £49.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    North of England Folk Song Suite | trad. arr. Alwyn Green

    An excellent concert piece of three traditional but contrasting songs, a love poem, a song of longing and loss, and a quick jaunty celebration of traditional life.The Sweet Lass of Richmond Hill from Yorkshire is a love ballad. The lass is Frances l'Anson, whose parents disapproved of her chosen love, and the couple eloped. The piece popularised the poetic phrase - A Rose without a Thorn.The Oak and the Ash from Lancashire is a traditional song comparing town and country life - a very popular theme in the 17th century. A girl from the North of England has moved to London to find a husband, but she is lonely in the city and wishes she could be home again - 'O the Oak and the Ash and the bonny Elum tree, they're all growing green in the North Country'The Keel Row from Northumberland is a traditional folk song evoking the life and work of the Keelmen of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and with it's quick light beat it is used as the trot march for the Life Guards and the Royal Horse Artillery.InstrumentationSoprano, Solo, Repiano, 2nd and 3rd CornetsFlugelhornSolo, 1st and 2nd Tenor Horns1st and 2nd Baritone1st, 2nd and Bass TromboneEuphoniumEb and Bb BassesPercussion parts (2):1: Timpani, Glockenspiel, Cymbal, Sleigh Bells, Maracas2: Drum Kit, Gong, Side DrumISMN: 979-0-708127-02-4

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