Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 15 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £40.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Score only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £50.00

    Hymn at Sunrise (Parts only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    The idea for this work was prompted by a poem - Hymn Before Sunrise - which describes the majesty of a mountain in darkness, the sounds of a nearby waterfall and so on. Nothing came of the exposure to these pictures except for general thoughts about the dawn of day and a series of movements expressing a personal response to the wonder of creation in an imaginary moment in time. The movement titles, which were added later, are intended to underline a prevailing sense of worship, wonder and exaltation. The music is pure, not pictoral, though listeners may conjure their own images. An actual hymn - Tallis' Cannon - is incorporated. There are five movements: 1. Thanksgiving: A short prelude in two parts. First a brief passage of 'dawn music' before things become more vigorous: fanfare-like music ushers in the trombone section's presentation of the Tallis tune. A broad band version concludes the movement. 2. De Profundis: A slow movement shot through with anxious questionings featuring flugel and trombone. The mood lightens a little in the centre where the soprano cornet is featured and the movement ends serenely. 3. Celebration is characterised by rhythmic drive, this is buoyant with plenty of incident pointed up by the percussion. 4. Invocation: Melodic in nature and sober in mood, the first section is a series of short solos mingled with chorale-like statements. Central to the movement is a chorale-prelude style presentation of the Tallis tune. The third section reintroduces the earlier solo music by the full ensemble. Dissolving, the music enters the last movement without a break. 5. Paean: Marked allegro con spirito there is, quite rightly, a fair amount of fun in the rejoicing. Snatches of Tallis are heard, then comes a gentle passage with a cornet solo leading to fanfare music and recapitulation. Two recitatives are succeeded by a coda which brings the work to a sonorous and exultant conclusion.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £59.95

    Judd: Caelum Corona - Stephen Bulla

    Stephen Bulla's 'Caelum Corona' ('Crown of Heaven') portrays, in sound, a Christian's walk in faith, intended metaphorically via a musical narrative reminiscent of the early church pilgrims, their struggles and triumphs. The composer initially evokes the atmosphere of Rome at the time of St. Paul and other martyrs, thus the Latin title. Bulla marks his imaginative tone poem with dark, brooding music in the first two of three parts, in each of which he has embedded an appropriate hymn or song reference as thematic material. The first of these sounds in a minor key following a symphonic exposition made up primarily of fanfare-like motives, the music at times quite harsh and abrasive. The song is Paul's statement of exuberant faith (2 Timothy 1:12) in the midst of prison and persecution: 'For I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I've committed unto him against that day.' More challenging, aggressive music returns until a further point of reflection on Christ's sacrifice is reached. The music graphically evokes the barren landscape of Golgatha, the horror of the crucifixion, including stark wind sounds, a loss of stability via eerie, dissonant chord clusters, and even the nails being driven into Christ's body. The Baritones and then Flugel Horn softly play 'He died of a broken heart.' Yet the Christian life, despite its perils - both at the time of Paul and now - is a victorious life, and the composer resolves the tensions of the work in a scintillating finale, a brilliant setting of the old song about spiritual warfare and the ultimate triumph of Christ the King: 'Victory for me!' (T.B. 841). The chorus of that tune proclaims: 'No retreating, hell defeating, shoulder to shoulder we stand; God look down, with glory crown our conq'ring band.' That crowning is the same one sought and claimed by St. Paul (2 Timothy 4:8): 'Now there is in store for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award me on that day, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.' Believers look forward to participating in the final coronation of their Saviour - King of Kings and Lord of Lords - while humbly desiring their own 'crown of heaven.'

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £34.95

    Funk Engine (Score and Parts)

    'Funk Engine' was commissioned by Brass Bands England for the 2016 National Youth Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. What Ryan says about the piece:"When I was commissioned to write a piece for the Championships I decided that I wanted to create something a bit different to standard brass band repertoire. I decided that the best way to do this was to go a bit out of my comfort zone and explore some styles of music that I have yet to experiment with. I have always been a great lover of jazz, funk and big band music and the sounds associated with them. In 'Funk Engine' I have tried to capture some of these sounds, however I am a brass-bander at heart and as such I've tried to create a fusion of styles that hopefully combines the best of brass band and jazz into one piece.'Funk Engine' runs continuously, but is divided into three broad sections - fast, slow, fast. The opening is in driving big band style, which segues into a smoother lyrical section; the pace then picks up into a jazz inspired scherzo. After a delicate transition from the basses and trombones the euphonium plays a soaring scale - bringing us into the central movement - which begins with a series of languid solos before descending into a darker interlude. A flugel solo lightens the mood and the music gains momentum leading into a brief cornet chorale before a euphonium solo leads into a percussive climactic passage for full band. As this section winds down to settle on an open fifth, the Hi-hat and Bass section punctuate the texture with the first notes of the final section."The final section of the piece is in similar big band style to the opening and develops material from the first two movements. The percussion feature heavily at this stage and the tension builds towards a final statement, with the piece concluding with a bang!"

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £14.95

    Funk Engine (Score Only)

    'Funk Engine' was commissioned by Brass Bands England for the 2016 National Youth Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. What Ryan says about the piece:"When I was commissioned to write a piece for the Championships I decided that I wanted to create something a bit different to standard brass band repertoire. I decided that the best way to do this was to go a bit out of my comfort zone and explore some styles of music that I have yet to experiment with. I have always been a great lover of jazz, funk and big band music and the sounds associated with them. In 'Funk Engine' I have tried to capture some of these sounds, however I am a brass-bander at heart and as such I've tried to create a fusion of styles that hopefully combines the best of brass band and jazz into one piece.'Funk Engine' runs continuously, but is divided into three broad sections - fast, slow, fast. The opening is in driving big band style, which segues into a smoother lyrical section; the pace then picks up into a jazz inspired scherzo. After a delicate transition from the basses and trombones the euphonium plays a soaring scale - bringing us into the central movement - which begins with a series of languid solos before descending into a darker interlude. A flugel solo lightens the mood and the music gains momentum leading into a brief cornet chorale before a euphonium solo leads into a percussive climactic passage for full band. As this section winds down to settle on an open fifth, the Hi-hat and Bass section punctuate the texture with the first notes of the final section."The final section of the piece is in similar big band style to the opening and develops material from the first two movements. The percussion feature heavily at this stage and the tension builds towards a final statement, with the piece concluding with a bang!"

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £34.95

    Judd: My Hope - Roger Trigg

    'My Hope' was written for, and premiered by Enfield Citadel Band (Bandmaster Jonathan Corry) on 11th October, 2013. The work formed part of the band's annual pre-contest festival on the eve of the National Brass Band Championships which are held in the august surroundings of the Royal Albert Hall, London each year. The words 'my hope' appear in both hymns that are referenced in the music. The notes 'E', 'C', 'B' also feature throughout the work as homage to Enfield Citadel Band. The verse of 'My hope is built on nothing less' (S.A.S.B. 662), to the tune 'Solid Rock' (T.B. 446), is then introduced and forms the basis of the end of the first section - set in the minor, unlike the usual setting of the melody. The more sedate middle section that follows features an original theme, again using the notes 'E', 'C', 'B' as a melodic stimulus.The tune 'Michael' (Herbert Howells), to which the text 'All my hope on God is founded' (S.A.S.B. 530) is sung, provided the original impetus for this work. The song features as a new addition to The Salvation Army's 2015 iteration of its song book. It is a noble tune and there are big majestic, organ-like sounds utilised in its final treatment which brings the work to a climactic end.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £89.99

    Ross Roy (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - De Haan, Jacob

    In this composition, Jacob de Haan sees the "Ross Roy" as a metaphor for the years spent at school (a monument in time), where one's personality is formed. So, the opening theme the artist calls the Ross Roy theme initially has monumental characteristics.The rhythmic motion, which strides along in the lower register and percussion at the beginning of the next section is typical of "Tempo di Marcia". This movement, accompanied by repetitions of sound, is a metaphor for the structure and discipline in school. This is the introduction to a march theme, symbolic of "passing through" the classes up to the final examinations.Then, the Ross Roy theme is dealt with again, now in a playful, humorous variation. As if the composer is saying there should also be time for a smile in school. The same theme can be heard in major key and a slower tempo in the following section, expressing pride and self-confidence. This is also the introduction to the expressive middle section that represents love, friendship and understanding.We then return to the march theme in a slightly altered construction. The oriental sounds, constituting the modulation to the final theme, are symbols of the diversity of cultures in the school. The characteristic final theme first sounds solemn, but turns into a festive apotheosis. It is no coincidence that the final cadence is reminiscent of the close to a traditional overture, for the school years can be considered the "overture" to the rest of one's life.Duration: 9:20

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £45.00

    The Pilgrim - Josiah Walters

    Josiah describes his composition'The Pilgrim' as a journey of development and emotion, encompassing three key stages of emotional state: from the opening sounds which are full of anticipation and uncertainty, through to a passage of disillusionment and frustration, then moving on to a concluding stage which reintroduces the positive elements of the opening optimism, yet closing quietly, symbolizing an inner peace and contentment at the end of the musical journey.The composer's emotive approach to the creation of the work embraces a wealth of passion, anguish and enlightenment. Through his use of imaginative melody, themes and harmonic texture, Josiah has represented a collection of powerful emotions. Essentially non-programmatic, the piece opens in a contemplative manner, building with enthusiasm, and first introducing the use of bells and bell effects as a musical metaphor which is used throughout the piece to signify the journey's destination.As the sentiment continues, the music evolves in to an Allegro Furioso section, opening up a strong sense of frustration. At this section's climax, the symbolic use of the bells is reintroduced to create an over-tone of hope and purpose, although this does not last long as they fade into the Misterioso Molto Rubato section.As the melodies and harmonies develop onwards, 'The Pilgrim' evolves into a more reflective phase, reintroducing the sounds and motifs of the more strident opening.This closing section symbolizes the realisation that everything needed was already available to The Pilgrim, but travelling the journey, confronting and overcoming all of the challenges was the only route of discovery - peacefulness prevails, bringing the work to a close with a sense of contentment and enlightenment.'The Pilgrim', highly emotive in its creation, offers a wealth of musical imagery.Even to the uninformed listener, this fascinating, powerful and beautiful work stirs and stimulates a variety of emotional reactions - offering each listener an opportunity to apply the music to their own journey, their own personal pilgrimage.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £74.99

    Catedrales - Bert Appermont

    Cathedrals have always appealed to the imagination. Hundreds of years of manpower have been invested in their building and it is not for nothing that today they represent imposing symbols of architecture and history. The cathedral is also a great source of inspiration for compositions, drawing on a full palette of acoustic echo effects, Gregorian melodies and organ based choral themes.The work "Catedrals" opens with a five tone motif using double tonguing which resonates through space. Then comes a Gregorian antiphonal theme "Salve Regina" which is heard in the euphonium and later combines with the opening motif. The quicker passage that follows is basedentirely on the intervals in the motif which by now has added rhythmic variations and develops in different forms, including a fugue. The work then builds towards its first climax, from which unusual muted sounds emerge creating an atmosphere shrouded in mystery.Gradually, more melodious fragments are added to the Gregorian antiphonal theme which develops into an expansive choral, emulating the organ and which rises above the sound mass. The work grows more powerful and brilliant in sound until it culminates in a short and explosive finale wherein elements from the whole work come together.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £25.00

    ...and the winter moon rises

    Description...and the winter moon riseswas inspired by a winter's evening car journey across the Pennines from Manchester to Huddersfield, through the brass band heartland of Saddleworth. There was recent snow on the ground, and the sun had just set. A bright clear moon was rising into a sky coloured with orange from the setting sun, and the moonlight made all the snow and ice sparkle.The work is the fourth movement of a larger 5 movement suite entitled "North!", but can be (and has been) performed in isolation. This work was a finalist in the 2012 Ohio Brass Arts Festival composition competition.Performance NotesThe percussion parts should be playable by three players; the "arco" parts of the vibraphone parts should be played by drawing a cello or double bass bow up the side of the bar. Motors should be left off throughout.Three of the brass players are asked to double on triangles for the first part of the piece; ideally these should be of different sizes giving clearly different sounds. The easiest solution is to tie a triangle to the music stand, rather than try to hold it and then swap instruments later in the piece.Click below to watch a playback preview of the score!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days