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  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £52.00

    The Forest Battle (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Born in 1932, John Williams is probably one of the greatest living composers of film music. The Forest Battle is from the film 'Return of the Jedi', one of John Williams collaborations with the director Steven Spielberg. 03:41

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £40.00 £40.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    La Perla Negra

    For this brooding piece the composer has used the following storyline. “A sad elderly man sits alone in a bar whilst an accordionist plays a slow tango. A beautiful woman walks in wearing a single black pearl necklace and proceeds to dance with the old man. Gradually the music becomes more and more spirited and the dance faster as the old man becomes youthful again. With a passionate kiss he passes out in the girls arms and when he awakens he is back in the bar alone save for the accordionist. As he contemplates his dream he notices a single black pearl left behind on the bar. The sombre mood is lightened in the middle section by a deliberately trite and vibrato fuelled section, but we soon return to the opening material for a slow fade-out” Composer Colin Skinner wrote this piece especially for Superbrass’ debut CD “Under the Spell of Spain”.Duration: 6.30 minutesPercussion: 4 players playing drum kit, maracas, xylophone, triangle, tambourine, glockenspiel, claves, castanets and marimba.Grade 3: Medium 1st and 2nd Section Bands

  • £70.00 £70.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    Bass Trombone Concerto

    Written in 2006 for Roger Argente, Gareth Wood brings his considerable experience of writing for brass, and brass bands in particular, to an instrument not often blessed with opportunities for solo exposure. It is scored for soloist accompanied by traditional brass band line-up, including timpani and two percussion, and follows the standard three-movement pattern. In the first movement, the soloist launches straight into the musical argument with a low-lying repeated quaver figure punctuated by the band. A lyrical second subject in the high register is also entrusted to the soloist, and the movement comes to a thrilling conclusion. The slow movement opens softly with the percussion, and a mournful bass line sets the mood for a thoughtful long melody. It reaches a powerful climax, which subsides to a return of the opening mood. In the march-like finale, the soloist is pitted against a number of solo instruments from the band and a driving ostinato carries the momentum through to the blazing ending.Duration: 13:00 minutesPercussion: 3 Players playing timpani, bongos, bass drum, side drum, suspended cymbal, tam-tam, claves, triangle, tambourine, xylophone and glockenspielGrade 4: Moderately Difficult 1st Section Bands

  • £15.00

    Humming Chorus - Giacomo Puccini - Phillip Littlemore

    In Puccini's opera, Madam Butterfly , the Coro a bocca chiusa ( Humming Chorus ) is performed by an off-stage chorus which hums a wordless, melancholy tune, whilst Butterfly, her maid Suzuki, and her child begin the long wait for husband Pinkerton to return after many years away. As night falls, Suzuki and the child are soon asleep, but Butterfly keeps her vigil. This arrangement features four flugel horns, each of which plays into the bell of a bass whilst the bass player moves the valves - creating a unique humming sound. Puccini actually wrote five versions of the opera, Madam Butterfly . After a disastrous premiere in early 1904, Puccini withdrew the opera and substantially rewrote it creating a very successful second version. However, he continued to tinker with the orchestration, not being satisfied until the fifth, and now standard, version dating from 1907. Item Code: TPBB-007 Duration: c.2'40"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £30.00

    March Slav - Piotr Tchaikovsky - Phillip Littlemore

    March Slav was composed in 1876 at the request of Nicolai Rubenstein (who had recently spurned Tchaikovsky’s first piano concerto, and might have wanted to return to favour with the composer). Tchaikovsky loved Russian folk music—looking to it for inspiration throughout his career—and he makes considerable use of it here. From the opening theme to the final glorious statement of the Czarist national anthem, the march draws on the music of his motherland. It was first performed in a charity concert to support a war effort in the Balkans. He composed and fully scored the march in the short time of just 5 days. At the first performance its impact was such that it had to be encored in full, receiving a tumultuous reception – twice! Item Code: TPBB-009 Duration: c.7'20"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £15.00

    One Fine Day - Giacomo Puccini - Phillip Littlemore

    One Fine Day is the opera's most famous aria. It comes at the beginning of Act II, which is set three years after the action of Act I. Pinkerton, Butterfly's husband, a US Naval Officer has returned to the sea after their wedding. In this aria, she sings about the day he will return, seeing the ship appear on the horizon, then seeing it enter the harbour. When he arrives, they will be runited for ever. Iten Code: TPBB-011 Duration: c.3'00"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Elizabethan Serenade - Ronald Binge - Len Jenkins

    Elizabethan Serenade was composed in 1951 by Ronald (Ronnie) Binge. When Walter Eastman at publishers Ascherberg, Hopwood & Crew (who had given Ronnie much encouragement following his return to the music industry after the war) heard the piece he said it sounded like an Elizabethan serenade and with the accession of Queen Elizabeth II in February 1952 and the advent of a second 'Elizabethan age' the piece was re-titled to that with which we are now familiar. The tune was used as the theme for the popular 1950s radio series Music Tapestry, Music in Miniature on the BBC and as the play-out for the British Forces Network radio station. It won an Ivor Novello award in 1957 and had chart successes in Germany and South Africa. Lyrics by poet Christopher Hassall were added later, along with those in German, Czech, Norwegian, Swedish, Finnish, Dutch, Danish and French. There was even a reggae version. In 2012, the year of the Queen's Jubilee, one website put it: "The song of the day?is Ronald Binge's Elizabethan Serenade" and, accordingly, it was played at the official Jubilee concert and The Last Night of the Proms.

  • £50.00

    Concerto for Euphonium - Philip Wilby

    Completed on New Year's Eve 1995, Philip Wilby's concerto has already established itself as one of, if not the, greatest concerto for the instrument written so far. Its extended length seeks to explore that fine combination of sustained lyricism and explosive virtuosity which typifies the modern euphonium in the most expert hands. There are two parts which divide into four movements. Part One opens with a sonata structure movement which alternates between a melodic style and some rapid passage work. The intention of the music is a firm and cerebral development of the opening fourth-based motifs. At the tranquil conclusion of this music the second movement bursts in - Zeibekikos - a rapid and extrovert Greek Island dance complete with plate smashing! Part Two re-examines some of the opening material surrounded by cadenzas, and centred upon a short and sustained adagio. The final movement opens with a rapid fugal section which moves inexorably towards a climactic return of the music and tonality of the open

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days