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  • £19.95

    PACK UP YOUR TROUBLES (Brass Band Marchcard) - Ord Hume, James

    Marchcard size. "Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit-Bag, and Smile, Smile, Smile" is the full name of a World War I marching song, published in 1915 in London.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £45.99
  • £19.95

    Pack Up Your Troubles - Felix Powell

    This set is march card sized

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £19.50

    Sing For Victory - Various - Alan Beaumont

    Nothing beats a good March, however this number is one with a difference. This perfect concert item takes three of the best well-known war-time songs and delivers them into a foot tapping entertaining item for your band and audience to enjoy. Featuring the popular numbers 'Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag', 'It's a Long Way To Tipperary' and 'Over There', your audience will have a hard time resisting the urge to sing along. A must for all bands in this year of commemoration and perfect for either the bandstand or concert hall.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £42.95

    SONGS OF THE GREAT WAR A Medley of Popular Songs 1914-1918 (Brass Band) - Wiffin, Rob

    Music of the Great War is a five year project to use music of the period to educate and engage schools, colleges, town bands, and the wider public across the UK and the world to learn in a positive way about the events, the experience of the troops involved from all sides, and how music played its part.This year, to commemorate the centenary of the Great War a specially arranged medley Songs of the Great War has been created. The medley has been arranged for bands to rehearse and eventually perform on the 11 November 2015. It brings together some of the most popular tunes played, sung and performed by the men and women of the time - in the trenches and on the various home fronts.With the support of many countries and organisations, on the 11 November the medley will be first played in New Zealand and Australia. It will ripple east across the world being performed in countries like India and Pakistan before hitting Europe and onwards to include performances in Canada and the Caribbean. This could become one of the most played pieces of music in a 24-hour period.In Britain, there will be performances across the country, including some at key events and sites involving a wide range of military and non-military personnel.The medley includes: It's a Long Way to Tipperary; Your King and Country Want You; Good Bye-ee; Oh! It's a Lovely War; Hello! Hello! Who's Your Lady Friend; Take Me Back to Dear Old Blighty; Mademoiselle from Armentieres; There's a Long, Long Trail A-winding; If You Were the Only Girl in the World; Pack Up Your Troubles (In Your Old Kit Bag); Old Soldiers Never Die/Last Post.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £34.95

    Dear Old Blighty - Dan Price

    Commissioned in 2014 by the Flowers Band and premiered at the Cheltenham Music Festival in the same year, Dear Old Blighty is a creative arrangement of songs popular in 1914 and of those released during the World War I period. These songs were used to help boost morale both at home and in the trenches being performed by the popular singers of the day. Although not patriotic songs in the strictest sense they are commonly described as ‘the songs that won the war’.The selection includes; There’s a Long Long Trail, It’s a Long Way to Tipperary, Oh! It’s a Lovely War, I Wonder Who’s Kissing Her Now?, Pack up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag, Daisy Bell, and Keep the Home Fires Burning, all cleverly tailored together in the composers recognisably distinctive style.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £10.00

    Endurance

    DescriptionMen wanted for hazardous journey.Small wages, bitter cold,long months of complete darkness,constant danger, safe return doubtful.Honour and recognition in case of success.– Ernest Shackleton, 4 Burlington StreetEndurance takes its title from the ship used by Sir Ernest Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1914-15. After many months of fundraising (and reputedly running the above advert in The Times) the Endurance set sail from Plymouth on 6 August 1914. Whilst at sea news of the outbreak of war led Shackleton to put his ship and crew at the disposal of the Admiralty, but their services were not required and they were encouraged to continue. On October 26 1914 they left Grytviken on South Georgia for the Antarctic continent, hoping to find the pack ice shrinking in the Antarctic spring. Two days later, however, they encountered unseasonable ice which slowed their progress considerably. On 15 January 1915, when Endurance was only 200 miles from her intended landfall at Vahsel Bay, the ship became beset by ice which had been compressed against the land to the south by gale force winds. Trapped in the ice of the Weddell Sea, the ship spent the Antarctic winter driven by the weather further from her intended destination until, on 21 November 1915 Endurance broke up forcing the crew to abandon ship and set up camp on the ice at a site they named "Patience Camp".The crew spent several weeks on the ice. As the southern spring started to reduce the extent of the ice shelf they took to their three lifeboats, sailing across the open ocean to reach the desolate and uninhabited Elephant Island. There they used two of the boats to build a makeshift shelter while Shackleton and five others took the largest boat, an open lifeboat named the 'James Caird' and sailed it for 800 terrifyingly dangerous miles across the vast and lonely Southern Atlantic to South Georgia – a journey now widely regarded as one of the greatest and most heroic small-boat journeys ever undertaken. After landing on the wrong side of the island and having to climb over a mountain range in the dark with no map, Shackleton and his companions finally stumbled back into the Grytviken whaling station on 19 May 1916.After resting very briefly to recover his strength, Shackleton then began a relentless campaign to beg or borrow a ship to rescue the rest of his crew from Elephant Island; whaling ships were not strong enough to enter polar ice, but on 30 August 1916, over two years after their departure from Plymouth, Shackleton finally returned to Elephant Island aboard a steam tug borrowed from the Chilean government. Although some were in poor health, every member of the Endurance crew was rescued and returned home alive.Endurance is dedicated to the memory of my mum, who passed away in September 2017.To view a sample PDF score (with watermarks) click here, and you can listen to audio excerpts below.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Endurance-extracts.mp3

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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