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  • £49.20

    MUSIC FROM THE 16TH CENTURY (Brass Band) - Fernie, Alan

    Medium/Easy

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    Coventry Carol - 16th Century English Traditional

    Coventry Carol dates from the 16th Century. Traditionally sung 'a capella', the carol refers to the Christmas story from chapter two in the Gospel of Matthew and the Massacre of the innocents, in which Herod ordered all male infants under the age of two in Bethlehem to be killed. It takes the form of a lullaby sung by mothers of the doomed children.In this arrangement, the Dies Irae or 'Day of Wrath' theme heard in the introduction lets us know of the impending rage and massacre portrayed in verse three, before the music eventually subsides and resolves with calmness and assuredness with the raised third tierce de Picardy.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £132.00

    Audivi Media Nocte - Oliver Waespi

    Audivi Media Nocte is based on the eponymous motet by Thomas Tallis from the 16th Century - a work that holds great fascination for Oliver Waespi. During the process of composition, various chord sequences and rhythmical structures emerged that led the work in the direction of a musical drama, with elements of a concerto grosso and solos for different soloists. An innovative, virtuoso and gripping work that can also take you far in competitions!

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

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  • £44.00

    Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ - John Blanken

    Gelobet Seist Du Jesu Christ (We Praise You Jesus Christ) is an old Christmas hymn dating from the 16th century, which can still be found in many hymnbooks today. John Blanken has created a varied and imaginative arrangement on four verses of the hymn. A perfect item for you next Christmas concert.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

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  • £39.00

    Hava Nagila (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Hava Nagila (the title means 'let us rejoice') is perhaps the best known example of a style of Jewish music called 'klezmer'. Klezmer music originated in the 'shtetl' (villages) and the ghettos of Eastern Europe, where itinerant Jewish troubadours, known as 'klezmorim', had performed at celebrations, particularly weddings, since the early Middle Ages.'Klezmer' is a Yiddish term combining the Hebrew words 'kley' (instrument) and 'zemer' (song) and the roots of the style are found in secular melodies, popular dances, Jewish 'hazanut' (cantorial music) and also the 'nigunim', the wordless melodies intoned by the 'Hasidim' (orthodox Jews).Since the 16th century, lyrics had been added to klezmer music, due to the 'badkhn' (the master of ceremony at weddings), to the 'Purimshpil' (the play of Esther at Purim) and to traditions of the Yiddish theatre, but the term gradually became synonymous with instrumental music, particularly featuring the violin and clarinet. The melody of Hava Nagila was adapted from a folk dance from the Romanian district of Bucovina. The commonly used text is taken from Psalm 118 of the Hebrew bible. 03:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £9.95

    Hava Nagila (Brass Band - Score only)

    Hava Nagila (the title means 'let us rejoice') is perhaps the best known example of a style of Jewish music called 'klezmer'. Klezmer music originated in the 'shtetl' (villages) and the ghettos of Eastern Europe, where itinerant Jewish troubadours, known as 'klezmorim', had performed at celebrations, particularly weddings, since the early Middle Ages.'Klezmer' is a Yiddish term combining the Hebrew words 'kley' (instrument) and 'zemer' (song) and the roots of the style are found in secular melodies, popular dances, Jewish 'hazanut' (cantorial music) and also the 'nigunim', the wordless melodies intoned by the 'Hasidim' (orthodox Jews).Since the 16th century, lyrics had been added to klezmer music, due to the 'badkhn' (the master of ceremony at weddings), to the 'Purimshpil' (the play of Esther at Purim) and to traditions of the Yiddish theatre, but the term gradually became synonymous with instrumental music, particularly featuring the violin and clarinet. The melody of Hava Nagila was adapted from a folk dance from the Romanian district of Bucovina. The commonly used text is taken from Psalm 118 of the Hebrew bible. 03:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Hava Nagila - Philip Sparke

    Hava Nagila (the title means 'let us rejoice') is perhaps the best known example of a style of Jewish music called 'klezmer'. Klezmer music originated in the 'shtetl' (villages) and the ghettos of Eastern Europe, where itinerant Jewish troubadours, known as 'klezmorim', had performed at celebrations, particularly weddings, since the early Middle Ages.'Klezmer' is a Yiddish term combining the Hebrew words 'kley' (instrument) and 'zemer' (song) and the roots of the style are found in secular melodies, popular dances, Jewish 'hazanut' (cantorial music) and also the 'nigunim', the wordless melodies intoned by the 'Hasidim' (orthodox Jews).Since the 16th century, lyrics had been added to klezmer music, due to the 'badkhn' (the master of ceremony at weddings), to the 'Purimshpil' (the play of Esther at Purim) and to traditions of the Yiddish theatre, but the term gradually became synonymous with instrumental music, particularly featuring the violin and clarinet. The melody of Hava Nagila was adapted from a folk dance from the Romanian district of Bucovina. The commonly used text is taken from Psalm 118 of the Hebrew bible.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

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  • £90.00

    Toccata Festiva - Jan Van der Roost

    'Toccata Festiva' was commissioned in 1994 by the Dutch Brass Band Championships. The wind band version was made a year later by the composer himself. Historically speaking, the toccata is considered to be one of the first independent instrumental forms for keyboard instruments. Originally the toccata was typically more or less improvised, later this musical form was given a more regulated structure. Both elements are used in the 'Toccata Festiva': on the one hand the different themes are developed freely, on the other, the piece has an orderly structure. It is in a three part form (quick-slow-quick) and includes both strong rhythmical figures and broad melodic lines. Part of the composition is written in a more or less archaic tone idiom, referring to the period from which the toccata form originates (16th century).

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

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