Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 65 matches for your search

Results

  • £29.95

    Just As I Am (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Heaton, Wilfred

    A typically dramatic 'classic' by Heaton. Published in 1947 but written many years before, this timeless composition is more than 'just a hymn setting' - more a miniature Tone Poem of real Heaton intensity. Immensely popular for both SA and 'contesting' bands and featured on no less than 6 recordings in this catalogue.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £14.95

    Just As I Am (Brass Band - Score only) - Heaton, Wilfred

    A typically dramatic 'classic' by Heaton. Published in 1947 but written many years before, this timeless composition is more than 'just a hymn setting' - more a miniature Tone Poem of real Heaton intensity. Immensely popular for both SA and 'contesting' bands and featured on no less than 6 recordings in this catalogue.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £8.50

    Rosanna - David Paich - Mike Sheppard

    In 1982, rock band Toto scored a worldwide hit with Rosanna. This song is more than five minutes long, much longer than was usual for hits at the time, though perhaps it was exactly this fact that contributed to its enormous success. The London arranger Mike Sheppard, who knows the pop and rock scene through and through, made a wonderfully colourful version of this rock standard.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £59.95

    Connotations (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    Connotations was commissioned for the 1977 National Brass Band Championship finals, held in the Royal Albert Hall, London (the winner, incidentally, of that particular competition was the famous Black Dyke Mills Band).At the age of 32 Gregson was the youngest composer to have received the honour of such a commission. It came at the end of a productive five years writing for the brass band publisher R Smith. Some of those works – The Plantagenets, Essay and Patterns for example, with their direct and tuneful style, have remained popular with brass bands the world over.For Gregson, these were the means by which he sharpened the tools of his trade, preparing the ground, as it were, for his finest work to date – Connotations. He thought of calling the piece Variations on a Fourth, but with due deference to Gilbert Vinter perhaps (Variations on a Ninth), he chose a more appropriate one. As Gregson has written, ‘Connotations suggests more than one way of looking at something, an idea, and this is exactly what the piece is about’.Writing a competition piece brought its own problems. ‘It has to be technically difficult and yet musically satisfying. I didn’t like being kept to an eleven-minute maximum. The inclusion of short cadenzas for less usual solo instruments seems to signify a certain test-piece mentality’.Gregson solved the problems admirably by adopting a symphonic approach to variation form: Introduction – fanfares, a call to attention, in effect Variation 1; Theme – a six-note motif, given a lyrical and restrained first statement; Variation 2 – a delicate toccata; Variation 3 – typically robust in melody and rhythm; Variation 4 – lyrical solos; Variation 5 – a scherzo; Variation 6 – cadenzas; Variations 7-9 – an introduction, fugato and resounding restatement of the theme.Duration: 10.30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £29.95

    Connotations (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    Connotations was commissioned for the 1977 National Brass Band Championship finals, held in the Royal Albert Hall, London (the winner, incidentally, of that particular competition was the famous Black Dyke Mills Band).At the age of 32 Gregson was the youngest composer to have received the honour of such a commission. It came at the end of a productive five years writing for the brass band publisher R Smith. Some of those works – The Plantagenets, Essay and Patterns for example, with their direct and tuneful style, have remained popular with brass bands the world over.For Gregson, these were the means by which he sharpened the tools of his trade, preparing the ground, as it were, for his finest work to date – Connotations. He thought of calling the piece Variations on a Fourth, but with due deference to Gilbert Vinter perhaps (Variations on a Ninth), he chose a more appropriate one. As Gregson has written, ‘Connotations suggests more than one way of looking at something, an idea, and this is exactly what the piece is about’.Writing a competition piece brought its own problems. ‘It has to be technically difficult and yet musically satisfying. I didn’t like being kept to an eleven-minute maximum. The inclusion of short cadenzas for less usual solo instruments seems to signify a certain test-piece mentality’.Gregson solved the problems admirably by adopting a symphonic approach to variation form: Introduction – fanfares, a call to attention, in effect Variation 1; Theme – a six-note motif, given a lyrical and restrained first statement; Variation 2 – a delicate toccata; Variation 3 – typically robust in melody and rhythm; Variation 4 – lyrical solos; Variation 5 – a scherzo; Variation 6 – cadenzas; Variations 7-9 – an introduction, fugato and resounding restatement of the theme.Duration: 10.30

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £107.99

    The Binding of the Wolf - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    This piece was commissioned by Nordhordland Brass Seminar in 1990 and written for a youth band. The title referes to a story from norse mythology. "The Binding of the Wolf" is not a programmatic piece of music, but I felt that there was a kind of coherence between the music and the dramatic story: "...The wolf Fenrir was one of the demonic offspring of Loki, and as he grew up in Asgard among the gods, he became so huge and fierce that only Tyr was willing to feed him. It was decided that he must be bound, and Odin in his wisdom caused the cunning dwarfs to forge a chain which could not be broken. It was made from the invisible and yet potent powers of the world, such as the roots of a mountain, the noise of a moving cat, the breath of a fish. When completed, this chain seemed to be no more than a silken cord, but the wolf refused to let it be laid upon him unless one of the gods would put a hand between his jaws as a pledge that it was harmless. Only Tyr was prepared to do this, and when the wolf found that the chain was unbreakable, the gods rejoiced, but Tyr lost his hand. The binding of the wolf may be seen as a means of protecting the world of men, as well as that of the gods, from destruction. The story of the god losing his hand appears to be one of the fundamental myths of nothern Europe..."

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music