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  • £39.99

    The Covid Collection - Gavin Somerset

    This exciting new 22-minute concert suite for Brass Sextet has been composed during the months of lockdown charting the feelings of a nation, with seven movements playable by 6 (or more) players. The music was composed with the intention for players to perform either together live in a small group, in isolation by way of a virtual performance (downloadable backing tracks are available to play along to) and ultimately, to give players something to enjoy as we all miss our brass band families. This concert suite is the perfect addition to all bands' libraries at a time when rehearsals are limited. Several of the movements are already in preparation for a full band edition to be released at a later date: (also available as a digital download worldwide - purchase now & print to play). Bands purchasing this sextet edition will be eligible for a discount on the upcoming full brass band edition of the concert suite. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Movement 1: FANFARE: The Call of the Band - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK This opening fanfare gives way to a full of life and energy. With catchy melodies and harmonies, it is an effective opening to any concert programme and the perfect way to begin the Suite. Movement 2: March of the Antibodies - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A cheeky little number that keeps on fighting though. Whilst not a March in the traditional brass band sense, players should aim to give a 'happy' performance of this movement ensuring smiles all around for both performers and the audience.Movement 3: Solidarity - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK The first slow movement of the concert suite aims to reflect on the isolation many of us felt during the time of lockdown. However, during these times, walks out with loved ones allowed many to connect and enjoy downtime, not often afforded to many. Movement 4: Lazy Days - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A movement whose title really does say it all. A laid back swing number that should be played in an as relaxed manner, as possible!Movement 5: Hymn for Carers (Dedicated to the NHS & Care Workers) - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK Dedicated to the NHS & Care Workers, this hymn tune is filled with emotional highs and lows, felt by many of the hospital and care staff who worked tirelessly to keep our people safe, with a timely nod at the end to Vera Lynn & our missed VE day commemorations. Movement 6: Army of the Keyworkers - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A stirring work in 12/8 which rightfully, depicts our heroes who kept the country moving through the most difficult of times. An heroic number for players to enjoy.Movement 7: CELEBRATION: Return of the Band - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK Little needs to be said about this movement, as at this time of release, we cannot yet celebrate the return of all players to the band rooms across the country. However, when that time comes, this movement is to be played with the joy of normality we shall all feel. CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FULL SUITE BACKING TRACK ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Each movement can be performed as a standalone item, or form part of the full 22-minute concert suite. Sextet scored for: x1 Cornet I in Bbx1 Cornet 2 in Bb1x Flugelhorn1x Tenor Horn in Eb1x Euphonium/Baritone in Bb1x Eb Bass*extra parts included are, Cornet parts in Eb & C, Horn in F, Euphonium/Baritone in BC, Trombone (TC and BC), BBb Bass in TC & Tuba in BC.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £30.00

    Days of John Peel, The

    A classic descriptive piece telling of a day in the life of the celebrated John Peel

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £59.95

    Judd: Caelum Corona - Stephen Bulla

    Stephen Bulla's ‘Caelum Corona' (‘Crown of Heaven') portrays, in sound, a Christian's walk in faith, intended metaphorically via a musical narrative reminiscent of the early church pilgrims, their struggles and triumphs. The composer initially evokes the atmosphere of Rome at the time of St. Paul and other martyrs, thus the Latin title. Bulla marks his imaginative tone poem with dark, brooding music in the first two of three parts, in each of which he has embedded an appropriate hymn or song reference as thematic material. The first of these sounds in a minor key following a symphonic exposition made up primarily of fanfare-like motives, the music at times quite harsh and abrasive. The song is Paul's statement of exuberant faith (2 Timothy 1:12) in the midst of prison and persecution: ‘For I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I've committed unto him against that day.' More challenging, aggressive music returns until a further point of reflection on Christ's sacrifice is reached. The music graphically evokes the barren landscape of Golgatha, the horror of the crucifixion, including stark wind sounds, a loss of stability via eerie, dissonant chord clusters, and even the nails being driven into Christ's body. The Baritones and then Flugel Horn softly play ‘He died of a broken heart.' Yet the Christian life, despite its perils - both at the time of Paul and now - is a victorious life, and the composer resolves the tensions of the work in a scintillating finale, a brilliant setting of the old song about spiritual warfare and the ultimate triumph of Christ the King: ‘Victory for me!' (T.B. 841). The chorus of that tune proclaims: ‘No retreating, hell defeating, shoulder to shoulder we stand; God look down, with glory crown our conq'ring band.' That crowning is the same one sought and claimed by St. Paul (2 Timothy 4:8): ‘Now there is in store for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award me on that day, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.' Believers look forward to participating in the final coronation of their Saviour - King of Kings and Lord of Lords - while humbly desiring their own ‘crown of heaven.'

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £19.95

    Mythical Tales (Brass Quintet) - Bond, ChristopherEnsemble Size:

    Mythical Tales (2012) is a ten minute work in three movements which represents three of the most popular folk stories or indeed in the case of the first movement, true stories, in Welsh culture.I. Owain GlyndwrOwain Glyn Dwr was born around the 1350s into an Anglo-Welsh gentry family. His estates provided him with a modest power base in north-east Wales. After a number of disputes, he proclaimed himself prince of Wales in September 1400.Glyn Dwr led several battles with the English, although he was never captured. Over the next few years punitive measures were enacted to keep control of Wales, but these were matched by many acts of Welsh rebellion - among them the capture of Conwy Castle in April 1401. In June 1402, at the Battle of Pilleth on Bryn Glas Hill, Glyn Dwr led his troops to victory over an English army. By now Glyn Dwr was leading a national revolt. In 1404, he led a march towards Wocester, but failed, with the English capturing parts of Wales. He died defending his country.II. MyfanwyMyfanwy was the most beautiful woman in Powys, but she was vain and liked nothing better than to be told how beautiful she was. Many handsome men would court her, but she would not show interest because they couldn’t sing and play to her, reflecting her true beauty.Luckily, a penniless bard, Hywel ap Einion was in love with Myfanwy, and one day plucked up the courage to climb up the hill to the castle with his harp, to sing and play to her. He’s allowed in to play for her, and while he’s playing and complimenting her on her beauty she can neither listen nor look at any other man. Because of this Hywel believes that she has fallen in love with him. But his hopes are dashed when a richer, more handsome and more eloquent lover comes along. The music of the second movement portrays the despair and upset that Hywel must have felt.III. Battle of the DragonsMany centuries ago when dragons roamed the land, a white ice dragon descended on a small village and decided to live there, not knowing that a red fire dragon was already living nearby.Six months later the red dragon awoke to find a huge white dragon wrapped around his village that he cared for. He could tell that his people were ill from the cold. The Land was bare; nothing was able to grow not even the pesky dandelions. The people were starving. The people longed for the red dragon to free them from the icy misery, so that their life and land could return to the sunny and warm climate that it was once before.The red fire dragon challenged the white ice dragon to a single combat fight at the top of the cliff the next day. The people of the village watched in terror awaiting their fate. The red dragon beat the white dragon, and the crowd cheered with joy as the red dragon roared with triumph. The mayor of the village declared that the land should always fly a flag with the symbol of a Red dragon on it. The flag's background should be half green and half white; the green to represent the lush green grass of the land and the white to represent the ice. This way no one would ever forget what happened.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £30.00

    Love Unknown (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Ireland, JohnArranger:

    This is a beautiful setting of a John Ireland favourite (Ireland composed the melody over lunch one day at the suggestion of organist and fellow-composer Geoffrey Shaw).The arrangement offers a tranquil moment for a concert programme, using a mixture of light and heavier scoring to bring the melody to life.The final verse pulls together the full band sound and then concludes with a reduced ensemble to produce a moment of peace and reflection in the performance.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £55.00

    Episodes for Brass (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Churcher, GarethCode:

    Despite the titles inference, the works form is not episodic, but more a depiction of various episodes in the life of the composer, who penned it for his wedding to capture the excitement and majesty of the day. The piece is in three movements: Fanfare and Bells of Celebration, Solenne (dedicated to the late Shaun Thomas), and Finale, which starts with a wake-up call, followed by a fanfare for cornets and trombones.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £19.95

    Abide with Me (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Lyte, Henry FrancesArranger:

    A free treatment of Henry Francis Lytes world-beloved hymn which was written in 1847 at Brixham, Devon, where the author was vicar. As he watched the sunset one evening the words of the hymn, in which he compares life to a single day, came to him. Dogged by persistent ill health, Dr Lye died in the autumn of the same year.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £45.00

    Bathgate Hills Trilogy - Andrew Duncan

    Composed by Andrew Duncan and written for the West Lothian Schools Band, A Bathgate Hills Trilogy is in three movements, each one dedicated to and representing a different hill.Comments from the composer:Movement 1 – Dechmont LawThe first movement describes the peculiar events which took place in November 1979 when a forestry worker, Bob Taylor, had a close encounter with an alien spacecraft in Dechmont Woods at the bottom of Dechmont Hill. Bob Taylor’s account from the time describes a large sphere like object about twenty feet across which pulled him by the legs towards it, caustic smoke then caused him to pass out. He awoke a short time later in the same spot but the spaceship had gone leaving behind marks in the soil. His story caused a great deal of media interest and a great deal of excitement in the local community.Movement 2 – The Knock HillThe Term ‘Knock’ is Scottish Gaelic for ‘hill’ and the Knock Hill is the highest peak in the Bathgate Hills being 305 metres above Sea Level. On a clear day the Knock hill has excellent views of the Bass Rock to the East and the distant hills of Arran to the West as well as of the whole of West Lothian and across the Firth of Forth to Fife and beyond to the North.The second movement is a description of a leisurely walk to the summit of this hill and the enjoyment of a pleasant summer’s day spent walking and taking in the beautiful panoramic views. However, as is the case with the Scottish Summer, a change in the weather finds a clear blue sky being replaced with dark rain clouds. The changed weather brings a sudden brief but unwelcome cold downpour of rain, drenching anyone out walking! Finally, the clouds pass and the more pleasant summer weather returns.Movement 3 – Cairnpapple HillCairnpapple Hill is a near neighbour of the Knock Hill. It is almost as high but interest in Cairnpapple Hill lies in the outstanding archaeological monument near the summit, an Iron Age burial chamber. The chamber dates back to 25 years BC and was built by a mysterious people known as the Beaker People (so called because they left behind a number of large earthenware beakers). The mysteries of Cairnpapple Hill have always been a source of fascination for me ever since first visiting the hill as a school child.The third movement describes the lives of the Beaker People. The landscape they would have looked out on would have been mostly dense forest which would have contained many perils including dangerous wolves and bears. Life was harsh and short for the Beaker People and they would always have been close to danger and to death. The average life expectancy for the Beaker People was only 31 years of age. The summit of the hill would have been clear of forest and would have afforded the Beaker People some protection as they could see all around the near countryside enabling them to keep a watchful lookout for their enemies – both animal and human!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £69.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £49.95

    A Day in the Life of a Knight - Phil Lawrence

    Here we have a most descriptive piece of writing - a story through music, by one of the brass band movement's exciting new voices. A fantastic 1st section testpiece and championship concert work:The opening scene would depict standing on the battlements of a castle hearing the thundering hoofs of our brave Knight's horse miles in the distance. His arrival is expected, and his reputation is known across many lands. Today, he is to joust amongst mere mortal knights and compete for the hand of the fair (and local) Princess.He vanquishes all competitors and wins the day. The scene moves to evening & court where reception and dance is to be held for our winning knight. Both Knight & Princess become centre of attention during the dance. Their eyes only for each other.At last, the Knight has a chance to be a lone with his Princess as they steal away from the celebrations to a star lit rampart above the castle gardens, where the Knight declares his ever-lasting love and pledges his life and of honour to her. He asks her hand, meanwhile monks pray in the below chapel hoping for union. She say's yes. It is announced in court, then blown from the battlements.Day breaks; he is brought word of evil doings back in his own land. He leaves word to the Princess that he will be back soon to take her hand. The trouble back home was a rouse to get him away from the Princes so one of the vanquished, a dark knight in yesterdays joust, has summoned a dragon to kidnap the princess for his own.As the truth of the deception reaches our Knight he quickly returns to face the varlet that has taken his Lady. This time tis no joust, but a fight to the death with the dark knight & dragon. Our champion proves his best once again and wins the day and the hand of his Princess forever!Phil Lawrence

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days