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  • £24.95

    LAMENT (Euphonium/Brass Band) - Jenkins, Karl - Childs & Wainwright

    from Stabat Mater

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £46.20

    MY LADY BOTHWELL'S LAMENT (Euphonium/Brass Band) - Fernie, Alan

    Grade: medium

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £20.00 £20.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Lament For Audrey - Len Jenkins - Len Jenkins

    Lament for Audrey was written by Len Jenkins for the funeral of a dear friend and supporter of Woburn Sands Band, and was played to accompany the entry of her coffin. Audrey is best remembered as a character, who, like many "women of a certain age", could be quite outspoken and innocently puncture the formality of a situation without realising the humorous and endearing effect of her actions. The piece is scored for quintet and the Bb Baritone may be replaced by Bb Euphonium or Bb Trombone with a commensurate shift in overall tonal quality.

  • £35.00

    Lament - Harper, P

    This simple but effective piece tugs at the heartstrings in its stark but beautiful portrayal of sadness. Features flugel, cornet and euphonium1st sectionDuration 3 mins

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £64.95

    Suite from Stabat Mater - Karl Jenkins - Andrew Wainwright / Robert Childs

    The World premiere performance of Karl Jenkins' Stabat Mater took place on March 15th 2008 in Liverpool's Anglican Cathedral, performed by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and Choir conducted by the composer.Stabat Mater is a 13th Century Roman Catholic poem attributed to Jacopone da Todi. Its title is an abbreviation of the first line, Stabat mater dolorosa (‘The sorrowful mother was standing') This text, one of the most powerful and immediate of medieval poems, meditates on the suffering of Mary, Jesus Christ's mother, during his crucifixion.It has been set to music by many composers, among them Haydn, Dvor?k, Vivaldi, Rossini, Pergolesi, Gounod, Penderecki, Poulenc Szymanowski, Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Scarlatti and Verdi.Here we have three movements from Karl's setting of Stabat Mater to form a wonderful suite for brass band;ISancta Mater IICantus LacrimosusIIIParadisi GloriaMovements I and III feature antiphonal writing for cornets (group A and group B) whilst movement II opens with a quartet playing together at the side of the stage, before taking positions at the front of the stage.Performance layout based on traditional band formation: Flugel and horns should sit in the solo cornets seats, basses should sit in the horn seats, euphonium and baritones remain why they usually are. Trombones should stand a central position behind the basses and in front of percussion whilst cornets (divided as indicated on the score) take standing positions, one group behind the horns and the second group behind the baritones and euphoniums.This suite can be augmented with the inclusion of the euphonium solo Lament from Stabat Mater and the cornet solo / duet Ave Verum from Stabat Mater. If using one of these it should be played following Cantus Lacrimosus. If using both Lament should be played after Sancta Mater and Ave Verum after the Cantus Lacrimosus. All of this music can be heard performed by Cory Band conducted by Robert Childs on the Doyen CD ‘Cory in Concert - Volume II'

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £20.00

    Edward Gregson: Music of the Angels, for Symphonic Brass and Percussion

    DescriptionProgramme NoteMusic of the Angels is a dramatic work of some 16 minute's duration, scored for a large symphonic brass ensemble, including seven trumpets, and percussion. The percussion section deploys 'dark' instruments such as three tam-tams, a bass drum and two sets of timpani.The title of the work is based on a quotation from the Book of Revelations:And I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpetsThus, the idea behind the work is a dramatic one and the composer has emphasised this by the partial spatial arrangement of the ensemble, with six solo trumpets standing centre stage, but behind the main ensemble, and the seventh trumpet off-stage throughout.The work opens with a four-note motif, dominant throughout the work, announced initially by four off-stage horns and answered by fanfare figures on four solo trumpets. Then in turn each of the first four solo trumpets announce their own cadenzas before joining together, independently playing their own music. This reaches an intense climax before subsiding into slow music which might be described as a Kyrie eleison - a lament for humanity - a cantilena for flugel horn and euphonium, accompanied by trombones. The drama soon returns with the entry of trumpets 5 and 6, playing music that is fast, more urgent and foreboding, and describing in musical terms the horsemen of the Apocalypse.At the climax of this section trumpet 7 enters dramatically, representing the words of the seventh angel ... and time shall be no more. The opening four-note motif is here transformed into a cadenza of epic proportions, to the partial accompaniment of three tam-tams (representing the Holy Trinity). The ensuing scherzo, scored for the ensemble, is fast and furious, but despite the somewhat desolate mood of this music (briefly interrupted by the re-appearance of trumpet 7), it slowly moves towards a more optimistic conclusion, transforming the 'lament for humanity' music into an affirmative and triumphant climax.This work has been commercially recorded on a critically acclaimed CD from London Brass on the Chandos label, available HERE.For more information on Edward Gregson's music please visit the composer's website: www.edwardgregson.com

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £64.95

    Three Stories - Three Worlds - Peter Meechan

    This exciting concerto by young composer Pete Meechan is an important new addition to the euphonium repertoire. It was written at the request of David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, and composed between June and August 2003. The first performance was given on 8th November of the same year at St. Botolphs Church, Boston, Lincs. The euphonium soloist, David Thornton, was accompanied by the Black Dyke Band, under the baton of Dr. Philip Wilby.The concerto lasts approximately 15-16 minutes, and is divided into three movements I - Hubris: The House of Atreus, II - Discardation: Lament for Aerope and III - New Order: Flight to Sparta. A version of this piece with piano accompaniment is also available from Prima Vista Musikk.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £74.95

    Eden (Score and Parts) - Pickard, John

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £29.50

    Eden (Score Only) - Pickard, John

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £34.95

    Diversions after Henry Purcell - Jonathan Bates

    Composed for Robert Childs and the Foden's Band, this work sets out, in sentiment, to imitate Benjamin Britten's, The Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra. The music takes inspiration from the life and works of Henry Purcell - a composer synonymous with brass through his compositions for the court. It features every section of the brass band in a variety of styles, in anticipation of a triumphant Fugue.I - Pride & Prejudice: In much the same way as Britten's ‘Young Person's Guide' the work begins with Purcell's famous Rondeau, music used in several period screen settings, including the adaptation of Jane Austen's beloved novel, Pride & Prejudice.II - Devil's Acre refers to Purcell's birthplace, Westminster and showcases devilish technique from the cornet section.III - The Royal Organist features the horn section, and whilst the music takes its inspiration from Purcell's Te Deum, its title comes from a painting at Westminster Abbey, where Purcell himself was organist for many years.IV - "Full Fathom Five" features the virtuosity and range of the euphonium and baritone section and takes its title from music Purcell wrote for Shakespeare's play, The Tempest. It is a catchphrase deriving from a verse passage, beginning with those words, during a storm and shipwreck, where the water is about 30 feet (five fathoms) deep.V - Remember Me is the subtitle of Dido's Lament from Dido and Aeneas - Purcell's first opera. Here the trombones and basses remember Purcell, who passed away at the young age of 36.VI - That Blessed Place is reflective and takes its title from Purcell's epitaph at Westminster, which reads: "Here lies Henry Purcell Esq., who left this life and is gone to that Blessed Place where only His harmony can be exceeded."VII - Celebration takes the form of a Fugue and eventually brings the music to a close in much the same way as it started, with a grand reprise of Purcell's famous Rondeau.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days