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  • £29.95

    Carol of the Bells - Mykola Dmytrovych Leontovych

    Christmas time is my favourite time of year. I love the festive spirit and all the Christmas music both traditional and modern.This piece is based on the traditional Ukrainian Bell Carol that was composed by the Ukrainian composer Mykola Dmytrovych Leontovych. Throughout the piece you hear a four note ostinato that is the backbone to the music. I have taken those ideas and motifs and have mixed them with some of my own to create this piece of Christmas music.For something different I have given this piece two endings for the conductor to choose. The first ending is at bar 189 (page 18 in the score) where there is the repeated four bar ostinato section in the solo cornets and percussion that is marked "Keep repeating and fade to nothing". This is so the piece can either fade to nothing or for a bit of originality the piece can fade into the next piece during a concert programme.For ending number two you need to cut from bar 189 to 193 (bypassing ending one). And continue to the end. The choice of endings should bring some interesting performances of this wonderful traditional Christmas piece.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Island Whirl - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Island Whirl was commissioned by Margaret Milligan who wanted a brand new piece of music composed as a present for Ian, her husband for his 70th birthday. Ian Milligan is a keen and dedicated musician and he is the musical director of Callendar Brass, based in Callendar near Stirling in Scotland.Margaret contacted me about the possibility of composing a short lively piece which had a Scottish theme that would be ideal for Callendar Brass Band and any other ensemble to get their teeth into. This piece takes its inspiration from the traditional Scottish folk song ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’ which is a particular favourite of both Margaret and Ian.With thunderous Celtic drums the piece opens in a whirlwind of sound with fanfare brass and an off-stage soloist that can perform using either the cornet or trumpet. After the exciting opening, the brass and drums die away to allow the off-stage soloist to air the traditional tune ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’.The beautiful haunting melody, keeping its originality throughout undergoes a series of changes in the accompanying harmonic material before dying away to allow the Celtic drums to return. The percussion whip the band into a frenzy as the piece gets faster and faster. Just prior to the final notes the band diminuendo to allow one last closing statement from the Eriskay Love Lilt lead by the off-stage soloist before the ensemble charge to a dramatic close.When performing this piece I would recommend the off-stage soloist taking a position somewhere in the audience, so they can almost feel part of the performance. In addition, with the two tom-tom parts that represent the Celtic drums, bands should make the most of showcasing them by getting the two drummers out to the front of the band to perform. The ideal stage position would be with the players set up in stereo with one player in front of the soprano cornet and the other in front of the solo trombone.With the various choreographed movements from both the off-stage soloist and the percussionists. This piece is a great addition to any concert repertoire and is an ideal showcase for bands who want to try something a little different.I wish Ian at 70 years young, all the very best with his music making in the many years to come and I hope this piece, composed especially for him and Callender Brass brings them many years of musical enjoyment.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £102.00

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook - 10'40'' - BVT126 The primary inspiration for this work comes from the composer’s first encounter with the genre of Symphonic Metal - the opening track of the 2004 Nightwish album 'Once', entitled Dark chest of Wonders. The combination of full orchestra, operatically trained female vocals and the raw power of a Scandinavian metal band was a potent mix that instantly had me hooked.That same dark and powerful sound is one that a brass band can generate, and I've tried to capture that in this composition. Heavy Rock/Metal as a genre is arguably fifty years old now, but symphonic metal is a newer concept, and I feel possibly the one that can bridge the gap between two musical styles very dear to me.Composer Gilbert Vinter had explored through music the connotations that different colours held for him, and his movement Purple from 'Spectrum' gave me an idea for the structure of ‘Rhapsody in Black’. Andi Cook explored the different connotations of one colour within his own life, black being an easy choice due to the personal dichotomy of the black leather jacket he wore to the rock club on Friday night and the black suit jacket and tie he wore to the concert hall the next day.To avoid repetition the word 'black' is omitted from the five movement titles, each of which is a different episode. '...as Thunder' is a furious argument between two people - the top and bottom of the band - set against the backdrop of a storm, with lightning flashing outside while barbs, insults, sarcasm, tears and even violence is traded inside. Following that '...Satin and Pearls' is an old black-and-white movie with a wistful character to it as if we're looking back a screen icon with fondness long after their career or even their life has ended. '...as the Raven's Wing.' is deliberately gothic and funereal, hinting at Edgar Allen Poe's similarly named poem, with undertones of death and afterlife. The shift into F/C Minor (band pitch) represents the descent - alive - into the grave that Poe had a paranoid fear of his entire life. Family and friends standing around grieving, oblivious as we're lowered into the earth despite frantic attempts to make ourselves heard. '...and Chrome' is an unashamed motorcycle reference with all its born-to-be-wild, open air, high speed and freedom overtones. In a deliberate contrast to what went before it continues several of the same motifs though this time in the major key. Lastly, we reprise the second movement with '...as the Night Sky' which is simply the feeling of walking home under the summer stars, with someone important - who that is, is left to the listener, but a walk under the stars is always that bit special.There's an old saying that very few things are black and white. I hope this work will prove that even black alone isn't quite as simple as it's often made out....‘Rhapsody in Black’ is dedicated to the composer’s friend and mentor John Roberts, who shares his love of both brass and rock.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £64.95

    Suite from Stabat Mater - Karl Jenkins - Andrew Wainwright / Robert Childs

    The World premiere performance of Karl Jenkins' Stabat Mater took place on March 15th 2008 in Liverpool's Anglican Cathedral, performed by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and Choir conducted by the composer.Stabat Mater is a 13th Century Roman Catholic poem attributed to Jacopone da Todi. Its title is an abbreviation of the first line, Stabat mater dolorosa (‘The sorrowful mother was standing') This text, one of the most powerful and immediate of medieval poems, meditates on the suffering of Mary, Jesus Christ's mother, during his crucifixion.It has been set to music by many composers, among them Haydn, Dvor?k, Vivaldi, Rossini, Pergolesi, Gounod, Penderecki, Poulenc Szymanowski, Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Scarlatti and Verdi.Here we have three movements from Karl's setting of Stabat Mater to form a wonderful suite for brass band;ISancta Mater IICantus LacrimosusIIIParadisi GloriaMovements I and III feature antiphonal writing for cornets (group A and group B) whilst movement II opens with a quartet playing together at the side of the stage, before taking positions at the front of the stage.Performance layout based on traditional band formation: Flugel and horns should sit in the solo cornets seats, basses should sit in the horn seats, euphonium and baritones remain why they usually are. Trombones should stand a central position behind the basses and in front of percussion whilst cornets (divided as indicated on the score) take standing positions, one group behind the horns and the second group behind the baritones and euphoniums.This suite can be augmented with the inclusion of the euphonium solo Lament from Stabat Mater and the cornet solo / duet Ave Verum from Stabat Mater. If using one of these it should be played following Cantus Lacrimosus. If using both Lament should be played after Sancta Mater and Ave Verum after the Cantus Lacrimosus. All of this music can be heard performed by Cory Band conducted by Robert Childs on the Doyen CD ‘Cory in Concert - Volume II'

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine - Phil Lawrence - -

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda! Phil Lawrence.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £64.95

    Helvetia - Gareth Wood - -

    I first went to Switzerland in the early 1970's and regularly played at the Lucerne Festival with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. It is a beautiful city, one of my favourite European cities.In writing Helvetia (the Roman name for Switzerland) I wanted to encapsulate the moods that remind me of this wonderful place. The work is in four distinct sections and is on the whole, self-explanatory.It opens with An Alpine Dawn and sunrise, the tubas and euphoniums substituting for the Swiss Alphorns. Next The Clock Shop at Mid-day, a loud ticking, chiming and the sad sound of a cuckoo, builds into the cacophony of the mid-day chimes. The third section is A Walk to Wagner's House. Just along the lake from the centre of town is Tribschen. This walk I have done many times, and it is here that Wagner wrote ‘Tristan'. I have quoted the Dresden Amen (written by J.G. Naumann) which is much used in Parsifal. The final section is The Cesta Run, the most famous bob-sleigh run in the world. As we take each corner, the feeling of speed is demonstrated as only a brass band can do!The work is dedicated to the Cory Band and also to the memory of James Watson, a great cornet player, trumpeter and conductor. It was he who got me into writing for brass band and I hope this piece is worthy.Gareth Wood (Feb. 2011)

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £64.95

    Sleepless Cities - Paul Lovatt-Cooper - -

    I have been very fortunate in my life to have visited many wonderful countries and places around the world as a musician, whether it is as a composer, performer, conductor or soloist. From my experiences I wanted to compose a piece of music that showcases cities that never stop and have a constant hubbub of energy.The ‘Sleepless Cities' that have influenced the basis of this work are New York, London, Sydney, Tokyo, Istanbul, Amsterdam, Zurich, Cairo and Dubai. However, when composing this piece I decided it would be impossible to assign a particular musical theme that sums up each city, as they all have such a rich and diverse cultural establishment.Therefore I opted not to compose this piece in separate movements to identify each city. Instead, I composed a piece where each city blends into one another, almost as if you were taking a speedy cab ride through each bustling metropolis without a break and without the constraints of time or distance. With each metaphoric turn round a street corner you arrive in a different city and before the listener can get used to the surroundings the cab turns again into another conurbation.Sleepless Cities is composed using melodic lines that follow in the traditional western classical style. However, as some of these places are so culturally diverse, you will also hear other cultural musical influences; for example the opening uses elements of an Indian Raga and the euphonium cadenza at bar 126 is based on the Middle Eastern Islamic call to prayer. You will also hear examples of gamelan music and the use of consecutive 4th and 5th intervals including the pentatonic scale which is a trade mark of Chinese, Japanese and Indonesian traditional music. There are also a number of occasions where both the western and eastern musical styles amalgamate highlighting the natural harmony that the differing genres share in one place.Paul Lovatt-Cooper 2009

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days