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  • £34.95

    Where Eagles Sing - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This work was commissioned by Philip Biggs for the Great Northern Brass Arts Festival 2006 and was written for Black Dyke Band and first performed by them in Manchester's Bridgewater Hall on 2nd September 2006.The inspiration for this piece came from a recent trip to Florida and to the Bird Sanctuary in Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom. I was lucky enough to be in the audience to see the rare bird's show where I witnessed some fabulous looking and endangered birds that were trained to perform different tricks that wowed the audience. The highlight for me was the conclusion of the show where the most awesome sight greeted us as an American Bald Eagle soared over the audience. That particular breed of Eagle has been a very rare bird of late. With so few in numbers, it nearly became a member of the sad group of animals that are extinct.The host of the show took great delight in informing the audience that the fantastic creature is now officially safe and no longer classed as endangered. This made a great impact on me as the Eagle is an amazing bird, huge in size and power and yet so graceful in flight.When Philip Biggs invited me to write a piece for the Great Northern Brass Arts Festival, I had no doubt about my inspiration and wanted to create a piece that paid homage to the American Bald Eagle. This piece is everything associated with the Eagle; bold, powerful and graceful and now free to soar and sing in the American homelands.Paul Lovatt-Cooper (August 2006)

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £32.00

    Elegy

    A piece for brass band featuring the soprano cornet. Slow and solemn, yet dignified and graceful, this allows the soloist to shine in front of the whole brass band. The band stays in the background for just about the whole piece, coming slightly to the fore in the more turbulent middle section. Lasting 4'30" a nice change of pace for a concert.

  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £59.95

    MY STRENGTH, MY TOWER Rhapsodic Variations (Brass Band Set) - Dean Goffin

    This music consists of a theme followed by five extensive variations. The theme is the composer's own tune set to the words, 'Thee will I love, my strength, my tower', a hymn by Johann Scheffler translated by John Wesley. A strong modal flavour is characteristic of the theme. Variation 1: This is a light and graceful variation with a good deal of imitative writing. It leads, without a break, into the next variation. Variation 2: Fire and ferocity are asked for in the course of this variation. Variation 3: This variation demonstrates the original approach of the composer. Solo lines for cornet and euphonium are included with their arabesques and arpeggii. Variation 4: Taking the form of a passacaglia, the 'ground' is given out at once by the basses. Fragments of the 'ground', plain or decorated, are combined and used in a number of ways, revealing the composer's mastery of counterpoint. Variation 5: The briskly moving and scintillating final variation abounds in sudden variations of dynamic. The tempo remains constant until an increase is called for in the coda. This 'contest' version has been prepared by Brian Bowen who was asked to re-work the percussion part and introduce a repiano cornet part (Salvation Army band publications do not, in general, have a part for repiano cornet).

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £40.00

    Junior Rock - Roland Kernen

    Junior Rock depicts two children, a brother and sister, who despite all their differences are both filled with the joys of life. The piece opens with a lively graceful theme depicting the light and good-natured mood that characterizes the two children playing. The music then becomes more calm and romantic in the middle passage. The piece comes to a cheerful and youthful close with the extended restatement of the earlier thematic material. It has been arranged for beginner bands and can be played with a minimum of six players (+ percussion).

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £13.95

    Flying the Breeze - Philip Sparke

    Flying the Breeze opens with three repeated B's (representing the initials of the Breeze Brass Band from Japan who commissioned this work). A short introduction leads to a robust theme from the baritones and euphoniums which is taken up by cornets and trombones. A restless bridge passage leads to a syncopated tune from the solo cornet and then to a third theme from a solo trombone. A graceful second subject leads back to a recall of the introductory material before a full-scale recapitulation. An intense allargando leads to a full-band version of the second subject under a running cornet passage, which leads to a short coda.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days