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  • £59.95

    Variations on an Enigma - Score and Parts - Philip Sparke

    Variations on an Enigma was commissioned by Howard Snell for the Desford Colliery Band and first performed by them in Gillingham, Dorset, England in September 1986.The 'Enigma' is a short snatch of a phrase taken from a well-known brass band test piece - a phrase which caught the imagination of the composer who took it as the basis of a sort of concerto for band with each section featured in turn. First the cornets have their turn, with a 'moto perpetuo', and they are followed by the horns and flugel whose variation is delicate and decorative. Trombones follow, each having there own tune in turn and then combining them together. Euphoniums and baritones have an expressive funeral march which is interrupted by percussion and basses who share a rhythmic, syncopated variation. A climax is reached and this is followed by a fugue (based on the theme) against which snatches of the preceding variations appear. The fugue heralds what turns out to be the theme on which all the variations are based, appearing in full at last, whose first five notes are derived from the 'enigma' theme. The piece ends with an emphatic final statement by the timpani.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Variations on an Enigma - Score Only - Philip Sparke

    Variations on an Enigma was commissioned by Howard Snell for the Desford Colliery Band and first performed by them in Gillingham, Dorset, England in September 1986.The 'Enigma' is a short snatch of a phrase taken from a well-known brass band test piece - a phrase which caught the imagination of the composer who took it as the basis of a sort of concerto for band with each section featured in turn. First the cornets have their turn, with a 'moto perpetuo', and they are followed by the horns and flugel whose variation is delicate and decorative. Trombones follow, each having there own tune in turn and then combining them together. Euphoniums and baritones have an expressive funeral march which is interrupted by percussion and basses who share a rhythmic, syncopated variation. A climax is reached and this is followed by a fugue (based on the theme) against which snatches of the preceding variations appear. The fugue heralds what turns out to be the theme on which all the variations are based, appearing in full at last, whose first five notes are derived from the 'enigma' theme. The piece ends with an emphatic final statement by the timpani.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    On Parade - Eiliv Herilkstad

    A big-band march featuring in a swinging style two songs by Major Joy Webb:AI want to sing itAandAFollow.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Unity Series Band Journal Numbers 354 - 357

    Contains the following pieces: In His Time,Follow On,Maddiston Jubilee,In The Cross

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    Christmas Music No. 11 - Wadsworth, G

    Hail, Bright ChristmasFollow OnWith Cheerful HeartsThe Way is ClearIncludes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £21.50

    The Girl From Zamora - Goff Richards - Gavin Somerset

    When the name Goff Richards is attached to a piece of music, you can be certain that strong melodies & memorable themes will follow. This piece, never before released, is a wonderful cornet/flugel duet that congers up the images of a relaxed Spanish lifestyle, in this easy going, laid back gem of a concert item. Originally recorded by Alan Morrison on his CD 'Memorable Melodies", this duet is the perfect item for both bandstands and concert halls. Not to be missed!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine - Phil Lawrence

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda! Phil Lawrence.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    SLOW RIDE IN A STATIC MACHINE, A (Brass Band) - Lawrence, Phil

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda!Phil Lawrence.Duration:4:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days