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  • £46.20

    I WILL FOLLOW HIM (3 Trombones & Flugel feature/Brass Band) - Richards, Goff

    3 Trombones & Flugel feature. Grade: medium

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £47.50

    I Will Follow Him (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sebregts, Ron

    This old hit has been revamped for the film Sister Act, in which Whoopi Goldberg performs the number with Deloris and the Sisters. This adaptation for brass band has been arranged by Ron Sebregts.Duration: 2:45

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £47.50

    I Will Follow Him - Del Roma

    This old hit has been revamped for the film Sister Act, in which Whoopi Goldberg performs the number with Deloris & the Sisters. This adaptation for brass band has been arranged by Ron Sebregts.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £46.20

    I Will Follow Him - J.W. Stole, Del Roma, Jacques Plante - Goff Richards

    Publisher currently closed for holidays. Delivery estimated 12th Aug

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  • £53.99

    I Will Follow Him - Franck Pourcel - Jan van Kraeydonck

    Theme from the motion picture "Sister Act"

    Publisher currently closed for holidays. Delivery estimated 8th Aug

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  • £34.95

    SLOW RIDE IN A STATIC MACHINE, A (Brass Band) - Lawrence, Phil

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda!Phil Lawrence.Duration:4:00

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear".Hear a computer realisation of the score and follow the music in the video below:

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine - Phil Lawrence

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda! Phil Lawrence.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £44.95

    Life Divine (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Jenkins, Cyril

    Programme Notes:Certain phases of Life are common to most if not all men and the music of the Tone Poem carries the listener through four of such phases.a) In the Andante Molto Maestoso a man's outlook on Life as a thing of seriousness and dignity is shown.b) The Allegro Vivace which follow shows him facing its problems with a spirit of vigorous optimism, while two tributary themes suggest that Life, with all its seriousness, is not devoid of humour and happiness.c) The short section which follows, Maestoso, is a reminder that times of stress and trouble are inevitable but these are quickly dispelled by thed) Andante Nobilemente, portraying the helping and ennobling power of true love.The music again proceeds to review these four phases of Life, the concluding section showing Love triumphant over all.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £20.00

    Sonata Piana??e Forte

    DescriptionSonata Pian'e Forte means an instrumental piece using soft and loud dynamics. A "Sonata" (at this time) meant a piece for instruments (as opposed to voices). It was probably written to be played as part of a service at St Mark's, Venice. This is the earliest known piece to specify both the instruments to be played AND the dynamics in the written music.Gabrieli was born in Venice sometime between 1554 and 1557 and studied with the renowned Dutch composer Orlando di Lassus. He also studied with his uncle, Andrea Gabrieli, and eventually succeeded him as the organist and composer at St Mark's Basilica in Venice. Already renowned as a musical centre, Venice became a magnet for composers wishing to study with Gabrieli after 'Symphoniae Sacrae' was published.Like many of his works, Sonata Pian'e Forte was written to take advantage of the unique layout of St Mark's, which had galleries on three sides where the musicians could be placed to create novel spatial effects – utterly new and exciting for sixteenth century listeners. Sonata Pian'e Forte has two different antiphonal 'choirs' and in this arrangement the band is split into two groups to reflect Gabrieli's innovative idea. Ideally the two groups should be clearly separated so the the antiphonal effect comes across clearly, although this will of course depend on the performance space. On no account should the band remain in its normal seated formation!As Gabrieli didn't have any percussionists (and percussion was widely thought inappropriate for music performed in church anyway) there are no percussion parts in this music.This arrangement is available for full brass band or 8-piece brass ensemble andwas first performed by the Blackley Band conducted by Andrew Baker in 2004.Listen to a computer realisation and follow the score in the video below:Duration approximately 4'20".

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days