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  • £27.50

    English Folk Song - Mike Frederick

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £61.99

    English Dances, Set 1, Op. 27: No. 1 - Sir Malcolm Arnold

    English Dances, Set I, opus 27, is a light classic composition that was written for orchestra by the British composer Malcolm Arnold in 1950. The set contains four dances that continue without pause: the individual movements are indicated by the tempo markings. The work came about at the request of Bernard de Nevers, at the time the head of publisher Alfred Lengnick & Co., who asked Arnold to write a suite of dances as an English counterpart to Dvo ak's Slavonic Dances and Bartok's Romanian Folk Dances. The premiere took place in the spring of 1951, played by the London Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Sir Adrian Boult. Following the success of the first set, DeNevers asked the composer to write a second one, which Arnold completed the next year (Op. 33). The Andantino from the first set has been skilfully arranged and orchestrated for brass band by Ray Farr.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £59.95

    Second Suite in F (Score and Parts) - Holst, GustavArranger:

    During Holst's earlier years as a composer, he took interest, as did many other English composers at the time, in writing pieces based on folk music. His contemporary Ralph Vaughan Williams had written his English Folk Song Suite, all based on English folk tunes. Holst followed suit and composed the Second Suite as a result. Six tunes are compressed into the four movements of the suite, each with their own character.The Second Suite consists of movements based on specific English folk songs

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £24.95

    Second Suite in F (Score Only) - Holst, Gustav

    During Holst's earlier years as a composer, he took interest, as did many other English composers at the time, in writing pieces based on folk music. His contemporary Ralph Vaughan Williams had written his English Folk Song Suite, all based on English folk tunes. Holst followed suit and composed the Second Suite as a result. Six tunes are compressed into the four movements of the suite, each with their own character.The Second Suite consists of movements based on specific English folk songs

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Le Canal En Octobre - Frederic Paris - Len Jenkins

    The tune that forms the basis of this arrangement for brass band was recommended to us by a good friend who plays concertina and melodeon in the traditional English Folk genre. Its delightfully simple melody is based on a French Schottische composed by Frederic Paris and is frequently played at folk music sessions where it is instantly recognised and internationally known. As a folk tune used for dancing, the piece would consist of Tune A and Tune B which would each be repeated several times in succession. In this arrangement for brass, that basic order of the melodies has been varied, and includes a brief foray into a minor key to maintain audience interest. It is not a difficult piece and should be within the capabilities of a fourth section band. However, it is recognised that not every brass band possesses a Marimba, and that part can be played on a Glockenspiel, with appropriate adjustment to fit the available range of the instrument.

  • £32.86

    This is my Father's World (Brass Band) arr. William Himes

    VIEW SCORE PDF The vibrant hymn of Maltbie D. Babcock (1858-1901) has been linked for more than a century to the English folk melody, Terra Beata. This colourful and climactic setting by William Himes emulates the concept of 'text painting', wherein the music strives to reflect the literal meaning of the lyrics. This is my Father's world, and to my listening ears All nature sings and round me rings the music of the spheres. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 4th Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb 1st Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Percussion 1-2

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £44.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £50.00

    Triumph Series Band Journal July 2016 Numbers 1275 - 1278

    No. 1275 March - Able to save (Gavin Whitehouse)This march was originally written for the Greater New York Railton Brass, which is the feeder band to the Greater New York Youth Band, in the USA Eastern Territory. It features the chorus 'Able to save' by Lieut-Colonel Norman Bearcroft, alongside the more contemporary song, 'Everyone needs compassion (Mighty to save)'.No. 1276 Carol Arrangement - O little town of Bethlehem (Marian Parker)The words of this well-known carol were written by Philip Brooks, a priest from Philadelphia. The tune most commonly used with these words in the UK is 'Forest Green', which was adapted by Ralph Vaughan Williams from an English folk ballad.No. 1277 Carol Arrangement - Still, still, still (arr. Ruben Schmidt)A setting of the traditional Austrian carol, 'Still, still, still', which appeared for the first time in 1865 in a folksong collection of MAria Vinzenz S?? (1802-1868), founder of the Salzberg Museum. The words, which run to six verses in German, describes the peace of the infant Jesus and his mother as the baby is sung to sleep.No. 1278 Worthy is the Lamb (arr. Warren Brooks)Ben Fielding and Reuben Morgan's song has been arranged for band by fellow Australian, Warren Brooks.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £19.50

    Auld Lang Syne - Traditional - Max Stannard

    The ionic words of Robert Burns were set to the tune of a traditional folk song and ever since, its popularity in English speaking countries has grown continuously. Traditionally sung to welcome in the New Year, this arrangement by Max Stannard suits all festive occasions and can be used as a moving encore to your Christmas concert programme this year.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £74.95

    An Age of Kings (Mezzo-Soprano Solo with Brass Band and optional choir - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The origins of this work date back to 1988, when I was commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company to write the music for The Plantagenets trilogy, directed by Adrian Noble in Stratford-upon-Avon. These plays take us from the death of Henry V to the death of Richard III. Later, in 1991, I wrote the music for Henry IV parts 1 and 2, again in Stratford. All of these plays are concerned with the struggle for the throne, and they portray one of the most turbulent periods in the history of the British monarchy.Much of the music used in these productions was adapted into two large symphonic suites for wind band – The Sword and the Crown (1991) and The Kings Go Forth (1996). An Age of Kings is a new version for brass band incorporating music from both the symphonic suites for wind band. It was specially composed for a recording made by the Black Dyke Band, conducted by Nicholas Childs, in 2004.An Age of Kings is music on a large-scale canvas, scored for augmented brass band, with the addition of harp, piano, mezzo-soprano solo, male chorus, as well as two off-stage trumpets. The music is also organized on a large-scale structure, in three movements, which play without a break – “Church and State”, “At the Welsh Court”, and “Battle Music and Hymn of Thanksgiving”.The first movement, “Church and State”, opens with a brief fanfare for two antiphonal trumpets (off-stage), but this only acts as a preface to a Requiem aeternam (the death of Henry V) before changing mood to the English army on the march to France; this subsides into a French victory march, but with the English army music returning in counterpoint. A brief reminder of the Requiem music leads to the triumphal music for Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York, father of Edward IV and Richard III (the opening fanfare transformed). However, the mood changes dramatically once again, with the horrors of war being portrayed in the darkly-drawn Dies Irae and Dance of Death, leading to the final section of the first movement, a funeral march for Henry VI.The second movement, “At the Welsh Court”, takes music from the Welsh Court in Henry IV part 1 with a simple Welsh folk tune sung by mezzo-soprano to the inevitable accompaniment of a harp. This love song is interrupted by distant fanfares, forewarning of battles to come. However, the folk song returns with variation in the musical fabric. The movement ends as it began with off-stage horn and gentle percussion.The final movement, “Battle Music and Hymn of Thanksgiving“, starts with two sets of antiphonally placed timpani, drums and tam-tam, portraying the ‘war machine’ and savagery of battle. Trumpet fanfares and horn calls herald an heroic battle theme which, by the end of the movement, transforms itself into a triumphant hymn for Henry IV’s defeat of the rebellious forces.- Edward GregsonDuration - 22'00"Optional TTBB available separately.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days