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  • £44.00

    Sometime, Somewhere - George Shutack - Klaas van der Woude

    An arrangement of George Shutack piano piece Sometime, Somewhere for Cornet solo and brass band. In this 'Rock Ballad' the soloist is given the opportunity to show off his musical talent leaving the audience to float off on a romantic cloud.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £53.00

    Berceuse - O. Olsen - Tom Brevik

    Ole Olsen (4 July 1850 - 4 November 1927) was a Norwegian organist, composer, conductor and military musician. Originally written for piano, this lovely, tender lullaby has been arranged by Tom Brevik for brassband and four solo instruments: Cornet, Flugel, Tenor Horn and Euphonium. Ole Olsen (4 juli 1850 - 4 november 1927) was een Noors componist, organist, dirigent en militaire muzikant. Oorspronkelijk geschreven voor piano,werd dit mooie, tedere slaapliedje gearrangeerd door Tom Brevik voor brassband en 4 solo instrumenten: Cornet, Flugel, Hoorn en Euphonium.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £22.95

    A LITTLE WISH - Peter Graham

    For soprano cornet, Eb tenor horn or Bb cornet and band, this lyrical solo is also available with piano accompaniment (see Gramercy Lyric Album below).

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £72.90

    Stealing Apples - Fats Waller - Reid Gilje

    "Stealing Apples" is an old swing-tune written by Fats Waller. Performances by Benny Goodman and his big band made the song very popular.In this arrangement for brass band, the mallet percussion is very essential. Mallet Percussion presents the melody from letter A and is also featured as soli-instruments from letter L to P. These parts can alternatively be played as vibraphone solo.Please be aware of the balance at letter A. Horn and Trombones must play piano but well articulated. Letter D must sound sparkling and fresh with articulated and powerful trombones and cornets (using straight-mute).Make shue that the 8th-notes are not played too dotted two bars before letter G. Almost even 8th-notes accentuated on the start of the slur is a good tip.Watch the balance at letter H. This part have to sound homogeniously.The soloistic Soprano Cornet at letter Q must be played in the style of Benny Goodan. The accompaniment must not be too powerful from letter R to S.Best of luck with the performance!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £73.00

    Stealing Apples - Fats Waller - Reid Gilje

    "Stealing Apples" is an old swing-tune written by Fats Waller. Performances by Benny Goodman and his big band made the song very popular.In this arrangement for brass band, the mallet percussion is very essential. Mallet Percussion presents the melody from letter A and is also featured as soli-instruments from letter L to P. These parts can alternatively be played as vibraphone solo.Please be aware of the balance at letter A. Horn and Trombones must play piano but well articulated. Letter D must sound sparkling and fresh with articulated and powerful trombones and cornets (using straight-mute).Make shue that the 8th-notes are not played too dotted two bars before letter G. Almost even 8th-notes accentuated on the start of the slur is a good tip.Watch the balance at letter H. This part have to sound homogeniously.The soloistic Soprano Cornet at letter Q must be played in the style of Benny Goodan. The accompaniment must not be too powerful from letter R to S. Best of luck with the performance!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days