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  • £21.50

    Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 (allegro) - J.S Bach - John Abbott

    The "Brandenburg Concertos" were composed and dedicated to Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721, however it seems now they were never actually played for him. This 1st movement has been kilfully arranged as a trio for Soprano Cornet and 2 Bb Cornets (solo cornet, and repiano). This is sure to test the strongest of players, utilising the soprano's high register and making work of the low register on the Bb cornets. As well as keeping the band entertained with running semi-quavers (and some wonderful intervals for the basses!!!) This certainly is a hard piece to perform for the three soloists, but its well worth the challenge.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £21.50

    Brandenburg Concerto No. 2 (allegro assai) - J.S Bach - John Abbott

    The "Brandenburg Concertos" were composed and dedicated to Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721, however it seems now they were never actually played for him. This 3rd movement has been kilfully arranged as a trio for Soprano Cornet and 2 Bb Cornets (solo cornet, and repiano). This is sure to test the strongest of players, starting with the famous trumpet opening. The Baritones, Euphoniums and Basses also play a very important role in this arrangement. This certainly is a hard piece to perform for the three soloists, but its well worth the challenge.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £23.50

    Rondo - Allegretto (from Clarinet Concerto) - Von Weber - Andi Cook

    Born in Oldenburg, Germany, Weber composed his first two operas aged just 16. Being one of the finest pianists around, his music is filled with vigour and spirit. Weber wrote three concertos for clarinet in 1811 at the age of 25, for the Munich clarinettist, Heinrich B?rmann. The most famous movement from the first concerto has been skilfully arranged for solo cornet and brass band. A perfect showcase of a piece.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £40.00

    Slavonic Rock March - David Well

    According to his teachers, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893), was not particularly gifted. His special talents were acknowledged only in 1865 when he had been working for the Ministry of Finances for some years. In 1866 he was appointed teacher at the Conservatory and applied himself to composing. His oeuvre is fairly extensive and many of his compositions receive a high ranking on the international list of classical music, including his six symphonies, solo concertos (violin concerto and piano concertos), ballets (The Nut Cracker, Swan Lake), and his overtures (1812 and Romeo and Juliette). In 1893 Tchaikovsky died of Cholera after drinking a glass of infected water. His Slavonic March is a popular concert piece for symphonic orchestra that is still frequently performed in concert halls. David Well arranged the theme and created a contemporary march in rock style. Tchaikovsky once said to an unsatisfied teacher: 'I will be a great composer within 10 years time.'

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    IN LEAGUE WITH EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN (Concerto for Euphonium) - Peter Graham

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concertos three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations. The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle). The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detectives final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down lndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey Around the World in Eighty Days (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloists technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloists increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009. Available MultiMedia Files

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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