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  • £34.95

    The Smoke That Thunders - Andrew Wainwright

    David Livingstone was a Scottish missionary and explorer. From 1841 until his death in 1873, Livingstone explored the interior of central and southern Africa. His initial aim was to spread Christianity and bring commerce and ‘civilisation' to these regions, but his later missions were more concerned with exploration. This piece of music tells the story of the part of his journey that led to him discovering Victoria Falls.The work starts out in optimistic fashion, with the Scottish folk-song A Man's a Man for a', by Robert Burns, which Livingstone reportedly used to hum on his travels. The troubles and difficulties of his journey were great and the next section describes his battles with the local African tribes, who were suspicious of his motives.After surviving these assaults, numerous bouts of African fever and several skirmishes with wild animals, a more reflective section ensues, which describes the doubts Livingstone had about continuing his mission. This is epitomised by the hymn Lord, Send Me Anywhere, which Livingstone himself wrote.After much deliberation and prayer, Livingstone decided to carry on and the final section describes his journey along the Zambezi River, the triumphant sounds eliciting his elation at discovering the magnificent Victoria Falls, or as it is known by the locals, "Mosi-oa-Tunya", The Smoke That Thunders.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £89.95

    INFINITY (Brass Band Set) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    INFINITY (Brass Band Study Score) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £82.00

    The Saga of Haakon the Good - Score & Parts - Philip Sparke

    The Saga of Haakon the Good was commissioned by Frei Hornmusikk, from Norway, to celebrate the joining of the two neighbouring Kommuner of Frei and Kristiansund, which took place on 1st January 2008. The band used it as their test piece in the Norwegian National Brass Band Championships the following February.The piece traces key events in the life of Haakon the Good (c. 920-961), later to become King Haakon 1 - THE FUTURE KING - who had been fostered by King Athelstan of England as part of a peace agreement made by his father. The English king brought him up in the Christian religion, and, on the news of his father's death, provided him with ships and men for an expedition against his half-brother Eirik Bloodaxe, who had been proclaimed king of Norway. On his arrival he travelled north - THE JOURNEY TO TRONDHEIM - where he began to gain the support of the landowners by promising to give up the rights of taxation his father had previously claimed.Eirik's sons allied themselves with the Danes, but were invariably defeated by Haakon, who was successful in everything he undertook except in his attempt to introduce Christianity to the country - THE MISSIONARY KING - which aroused an opposition he did not feel strong enough to face.One of his most famous victories was THE BATTLE OF RASTARKALV (near to Frei) in 955. By placing ten standards far apart along a low ridge (to give the impression his army was bigger than it actually was) he managed to fool Eirik's sons that they were out-numbered. The Danes fled and were slaughtered by Haakon's army. These ten standards are represented by ten loud chords starting in bar 420

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.75

    The Saga of Haakon the Good - Score Only - Philip Sparke

    The Saga of Haakon the Good was commissioned by Frei Hornmusikk, from Norway, to celebrate the joining of the two neighbouring Kommuner of Frei and Kristiansund, which took place on 1st January 2008. The band used it as their test piece in the Norwegian National Brass Band Championships the following February.The piece traces key events in the life of Haakon the Good (c. 920-961), later to become King Haakon 1 - THE FUTURE KING - who had been fostered by King Athelstan of England as part of a peace agreement made by his father. The English king brought him up in the Christian religion, and, on the news of his father's death, provided him with ships and men for an expedition against his half-brother Eirik Bloodaxe, who had been proclaimed king of Norway. On his arrival he travelled north - THE JOURNEY TO TRONDHEIM - where he began to gain the support of the landowners by promising to give up the rights of taxation his father had previously claimed.Eirik's sons allied themselves with the Danes, but were invariably defeated by Haakon, who was successful in everything he undertook except in his attempt to introduce Christianity to the country - THE MISSIONARY KING - which aroused an opposition he did not feel strong enough to face.One of his most famous victories was THE BATTLE OF RASTARKALV (near to Frei) in 955. By placing ten standards far apart along a low ridge (to give the impression his army was bigger than it actually was) he managed to fool Eirik's sons that they were out-numbered. The Danes fled and were slaughtered by Haakon's army. These ten standards are represented by ten loud chords starting in bar 420

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days