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  • £21.50

    The Lord Of The Dance - Ronan Hardiman - Gavin Somerset

    During an interval at the Eurovision Song Contest in 1994, Michael Flatley & the 'Riverdance' cast took the world by storm and continued to achieve worldwide success. Michael Flatley left 'Riverdance' with the dream of creating a show that was suitable for performances in arenas and not just traditional theatres – 'The Lord Of The Dance' was born. Using the traditional US shaker hymn 'The Lord of the Dance' as the shows main theme, Ronan Hardiman adapted the music to be bursting with life. This arrangement by Gavin Somerset is full of excitement and energy, arranged to ensure this effect is playable by most levels of bands. A real crowd pleaser & finale act that will have the audiences on their feet!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £40.00 £40.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    The Raft of Medusa

    “The Raft of the Medusa” is a painting by Theodore Gericault and hangs in the Louvre, Paris. It depicts the true story of a shipwreck and of a hastily constructed raft upon which at least 157 people were cast adrift for 13 days and endured starvation, dehydration, cannibalism and madness. The work is a diabolical duel between cornet and trombone, a violent tone poem showing off the techniques of the soloists. There is no light in this piece, no triumph, only sadness.Duration: 6:00 minutesPercussion: 2 Players playing tom-tom, woodblocks and bass drumGrade 6: Very Difficult Championship Section Bands

  • £38.00

    Vortex (Score only) - Robert Simpson

    Vortex - a mass of swirling fluid; the centre of the vortex is static whereas the swirling mass becomes faster as it is sucked inexorably towards the centre. This is reflected in the structure of Robert Simpson's final work for brass band. It is cast in a single fast tempo movement made up of three sections. Each section begins softly but actively and grows in volume and intensity to a great discharge of energy on a unison note. Each section is longer than then the last and each unison discharge is a semitone lower than the last. The effect is cumulative and the closing pages witness an explosion of energy from the full band gradually rbeing drawn into the unison final note. Vortex was commissioned by the IMI Yorkshire Imperial Band and first performed at the Leeds Music Festival on 6 July 1990.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £48.00

    Vortex (Parts only) - Robert SImpson

    Vortex - a mass of swirling fluid; the centre of the vortex is static whereas the swirling mass becomes faster as it is sucked inexorably towards the centre. This is reflected in the structure of Robert Simpson's final work for brass band. It is cast in a single fast tempo movement made up of three sections. Each section begins softly but actively and grows in volume and intensity to a great discharge of energy on a unison note. Each section is longer than then the last and each unison discharge is a semitone lower than the last. The effect is cumulative and the closing pages witness an explosion of energy from the full band gradually rbeing drawn into the unison final note. Vortex was commissioned by the IMI Yorkshire Imperial Band and first performed at the Leeds Music Festival on 6 July 1990.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £27.50

    Well, Did you Evah! - Porter, C - Somerset, G

    Released in 1956, the Hollywood musicalHigh Society was a musical remake of ThePhiladelphia Story. It had a star studdedcast, including Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby,Grace Kelly and Louis Armstrong (whoplayed himself). Gavin Somerset'sarrangement of Well, Did you Evah!faithfully reproduces the famous Crosby/Sinatra duet for two euphoniums.Entertainment at its best!!4th section +

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £54.95

    Divertimento (Barry) - Darrol Barry

    Especially published for the National Championships of Great Britain in 1989, this work is cast in three movements: Festival, Romance and March. A popular and engaging work at this level, it is no stranger to the contest platform, having been used as the Section 3 'Regional' test-piece in 1990, and the third tier of the Dutch and Australian Championships in 1995 and 1996 respectively.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Hellfire - Ben Hollings

    Hellfire was written for the Carlton Main Frickley Colliery Band’s programme of music at the 40th Brass in Concert Championships at the Sage, Gateshead; a programme which told the story of the Great Fire of London 350 years ago.Hellfire depicts part of the story where the fire broke out on Pudding Lane and spread throughout London, causing havoc and leading people to flee from the city for their safety. The piece opens with night falling upon the city on the evening of September 2nd, 1666. Swirling sounds and distant rumblings are heard throughout the band as easterly winds blow strongly through the city. Suddenly a single spark is blown out of the baker’s oven and ignites the great fire. The fire quickly spreads, alarm bells are raised, and panic ensues as people scream and run for their lives from the menacing fire. The strong wind carries the dancing fire across rooftops from house to house and the sound of collapsing structures thunders with the roaring flames. People look in awe and horror at the mighty fire surrounding them, whilst they stand in the ‘eye of the storm’. Gunpowder-fuelled explosions boom and the escape from the city continues. People piling their precious belongings onto boats and sailing down the River Thames to escape. A feeling of hope is cast upon London as the fire finally begins to subside, and 4 days later… darkness finally falls upon the city once more.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £117.00

    REM-scapes (Brass Band) - Thomas Doss

    Sweet echoes of Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata in the introduction bring a gentle slumber. Breathing is calm and sleep holds the promise of rest and relaxation.With the onset of the REM sleep phase, however, in which most dreams take place and where the day's events are worked through, we hear other sounds played.With distorted sounds, reminiscent of an old gramophone, the music pulls the listener inevitably ever deeper into the dreamscape, in a very realistic dangerous situation that comes to a dramatic head. It triggers a desperate struggle between the impulse to awaken and the exhausting urge to flee. For a short moment, it seems as if the wakeful urge has won out, before dream's powerful spell is again cast, and there's no escape...

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days