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  • £21.50

    Blue Skies - Irving Berlin - Neville Buxton

    This wonderful big band style arrangement of this popular classic is sure to bring high entertainment value to any concert. Introducing the music with a broad opening before the swing section starts, fairly straight forward until E when certain members of the band get to show off in this skillfully arranged section. A fast 3/4 time follows giving the Soprano chance to shine before returning to the big band sound to finish.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £19.50

    Christmas Lullaby - French Traditional - Lynda Nicholson

    Based upon the French Christmas Carol, ‘Whence Is That Goodly Fragrance?’, this moving arrangement by Lynda Nicholson really allows a band to show off their soft and lyrical playing. In a time where Christmas concerts are awash with the traditional and festive tunes we all know and love, this item gives the chance for something beautiful and different. Giving moments for all sections of the band to enjoy, the big climax near the finale is a great way to treat your audience to something new this year.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £87.00

    Theme Park Fun! - Wilco Moerman

    In Theme Park Fun! your orchestra pays a visit to an amusement park. During your visit, you will experience some spectacular rides and attractions this theme park offers. The uniqueness of Theme Park Fun! is the interplay between music and (moving) images. Animations and illustrations support the visual composition (downloadable after ordering a set, on www.gobelinmusic.com).Part 1: The Entrance & Parade [with animation]The opening of the park is a fact. A day full of fun and pleasure awaits! You and the other visitors will be confronted with all the rides, attractions and adventures the theme park has to offer. Which ride shall we do first?! There is so much to do and experience on this day in the park! A parade of colorful floats and park figures is passing by.Let the fun begin!Part 2: The Haunted House [with animation]The only ride in the park that is not related to fun, is the Haunted House. Here visitors will be challenged to visit a house full of ghosts, creepy figures and other ominous things. The clock strikes twelve, there is no turning back. Ghosts are whispering, yelling, screaming... Fortunately it is almost one oclock, so we can leave this creepy place quickly.Part 3: The Swinging Galleon [with illustrations]What a huge pirate ship! Each time you swing back and forth, you will feel that weird feeling in your stomach. When you are thrown completely into the top you will have a fantastic view over the park, but you can not enjoy it for long. Before you know the ship swings back the other way.Part 4: The Fairy Tale Ride [with illustrations]After all those exciting and spectacular rides and attractions, it is time for a peaceful tour in The Fairy Tale Ride. Surrounded by a fairytale setting, you will discover fable figures, talking animals and colorful designs. Such a beauty and tranquility. Having had this experience, we are ready again for the big rides in the park!Part 5: The Bumper Cars [with illustrations]Now its time to crawl behind the wheel of the Bumper Cars! Shall we all chase the conductor?! Before you know you are hit by another visitor or you will bump against someone else. In this tough ride you can prove yourself as a real driver, or perhaps as a really bad one.Part 6: The Roller Coaster [with illustrations]The largest, fastest and scariest ride in the park ... we should definitely do the Roller Coaster! All together in the train, the over-the-shoulder restraints are lowering... be ready to ride. The train leaves the station and is heading for the big lift hill. It will be very scary when the train reaches the top and the train will be plunged down the first drop! Loops, corkscrews and other spectacular coaster elements will follow... Before you know it, the ride of your life is over. Shall we ride it again?!Part 7: Leaving the Park [with animation]Unfortunately everything comes to an end. This day in the theme park is over, but we have a lot new experiences to talk about! The memories of all the funny and spectacular rides will come up when we walk through the park to the exit. Just one look over the shoulder, the amusement park figures are waving at us. Hopefully we will come back again soon!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £135.00

    Music of the Spheres (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilisations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.Duration: 18:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    IN LEAGUE WITH EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN (Concerto for Euphonium) - Peter Graham

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concertos three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations. The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle). The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detectives final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down lndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey Around the World in Eighty Days (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloists technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloists increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009. Available MultiMedia Files

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £69.95

    In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band) - Graham, Peter

    Concerto for EuphoniumIn League with Extraordinary Gentlemen combines two of composer Peter Graham's life interests - composition and 19th century popular fiction. Each of the concerto’s three movements takes its musical inspiration from extraordinary characters who have transcended the original genre and have subsequently found mass audiences through film, television and comic book adaptations.The first movement follows a traditional sonata form outline with one slight modification. The order of themes in the recapitulation is reversed, mirroring a plot climax in the H.G. Wells novella The Time Machine (where the protagonist, known only as The Time Traveller, puts his machine into reverse bringing the story back full circle).The Adventure of the Final Problem is the title of a short story published in The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle. This is an account of the great detective’s final struggle with his long-time adversary Professor Moriarty at the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland. The music takes the form of a slowed down l?ndler (a Swiss/Austrian folk dance) and various acoustic and electronic echo effects call to mind the alpine landscape. The final bars pose a question paralleling that of Conan Doyle in the story – have we really seen the last of Sherlock Holmes?The final movement, The Great Race, (available separately) follows Phileas Fogg on the last stage of his epic journey “Around the World in Eighty Days” (from the novel by Jules Verne). The moto perpetuo nature of the music gives full rein to the soloist’s technical virtuosity. As the work draws to a conclusion, the frantic scramble by Fogg to meet his deadline at the Reform Club in Pall Mall, London, is echoed by the soloist’s increasingly demanding ascending figuration, set against the background of Big Ben clock chimes.In League with Extraordinary Gentlemen was first performed in the brass band version by David Thornton and the Black Dyke Band, conductor Nicholas Childs, at the RNCM Concert Hall Manchester on January 30, 2009.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £29.95

    Song for the Skies - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Song for the Skies was commissioned by Tuba virtuoso Les Neish and was given its world premier on the December 9th 2010 with the James Madison University Brass Band in Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA.Les asked me to compose a slow melody that highlights the wonderful sonorous sound of the Tuba. I am a big fan of Les and of the instrument and knowing the capabilities of Les as a soloist I wanted to experiment with the range and colour of the instrument in this solo.After a warm introduction from the ensemble the soloist enters almost timeless over the muted cornets. The melody when it is first heard has a somewhat haunting Celtic feel to it. It is intentionally marked as con rubato so that the soloist can really put their own musical stamp on the music. As the haunting melody repeats again this time in a change of key the accompaniment takes more of a role within the piece of music performing counter melodies within this second section.The middle of the piece introduces a new secondary melodic device that serves as an introduction to the original melody played in all its glory by the ensemble. This dies away to leave the second half of the melody in the euphoniums and baritones as the soloist plays a soaring counter melody in the highest register of the instrument.The piece starts to return home with a recapitulation of the introduction followed by the second part of the original melody by the soloist. After a momentary reflective solo from the soloist the introduction is used for a final time before the tuba guides us home to conclude.For the soloist, there are a number of occasions where the opportunity to play in the upper register of the instrument arises. However, I have also given the opportunity for the soloist to play various passages down the octave so it suits the performers playing style and range.Song for the Skies is very simple yet beautiful and I feel it suits the playing of the Eb Tuba perfectly. I hope you enjoy performing it.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £104.00

    A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich

    A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich - 11'20'' - BVT117 After Karoonyavanich has seen her favourite seaview painting by Romain Steppe (1859-1927) for the first time, she was directly inspired and started to write “A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle”. This work consists of 4 sections: The Storm, The Graveyard, The Kingdom of Mermaids and The Escape. The concept of the opening is influenced by Chopin's Etude Op.25 No.11 “Winter Wind” which begins with a calm melodic theme. Then it turns immediately into the agitated and energetic movement representing the calm ocean that turns wild. The storm has taken away many pilots and sailors' life’s, they say people who survive from the storm were able to see the ruined of the victims at the grave yard. This movement of "Graveyard" sounds mysterious and dreadful. The following section "The Kingdom of Mermaids" repeats the storm theme and builds up gradually with solo’s to finally have a big climax reflecting the beauty of the Kingdom of Mermaids. According to one of the legends of the Bermuda Triangle, mermaids exist there and trick the sailors with their beautiful voice and appearance then take away all their souls. Some sailors realized that they were tricked and try to escape. Unfortunately, none of them could ever return back home. This section ‘The escape’ begins with low brass solos and gets more intense until the climax at the end honouring all the Bermuda Triangle's victims.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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